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I am investigating a GDI resource leak in a large application. In order to further my understanding of how these problems occur, I have created a very small application which I have deliberately made 'leaky'. Here is a simple user control which should result in the creation of 100 Pen objects:

public partial class TestControl : UserControl
{
    private List pens = new List();

    public TestControl()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            pens.Add(new Pen(new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, i * 2, i * 2, 255 - i * 2))));
        }

        this.Paint += new PaintEventHandler(TestControl_Paint);
    }

    void TestControl_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            e.Graphics.DrawLine(pens[i], 0, i, Width, i);
        }
    }
}

However, when I create an instance of my object and add it to a form, looking at my application with TaskManager I currently see ~37 GDI objects. If I repeatedly add new TestObject user controls to my form, I still only see ~37 GDI objects.

What is going on here! I thought that the constructor for System.Drawing.Pen would use the GDI+ API to create a new Pen, thus using a new GDI object.

I must be going nuts here. If I cannot write a simple test application that creates GDI objects, how can I create one which leaks them!

Any help would be much appreciated.

Best Regards, Colin E.

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Strange problem there, I agree. Have you verified whether the no. of GDI objects decreases from 37 if you loop fewer than 37 times? –  Noldorin May 18 '09 at 15:11
    
Yes - the 37 GDI objects appears to relate to the overhead of the simple test application itself. It is nothing to do with the number of loops in the above code. I think OregonGhost (below) is onto something GDI+ is not using GDI handles, which I assumed it did! I wish there was some documentation out there that verified this. –  ColinE May 18 '09 at 15:32

6 Answers 6

Does the GDI+ use GDI handles? I'm not sure, though I read somewhere that there is a .NET System.Drawing implementation that relies on bare GDI.

However, maybe you can try to find your leaks with a profiler like AQTime instead.

How are you sure your large app is leaking GDI handles? Is the count in Task Manager large? If so, are you always using GDI+, or also GDI? Does your test app GDI handle count increase if you create your control multiple times?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. Yes, that was my suspicion that GDI+ is not always using GDI handles. I am sure the large application leaks GDI handles. It uses a large number (>500) and this increases over time. As to whether we are using GDI+ all the time, we only use System.Drawing which I presume only uses GDI+ - is that correct? Thanks. –  ColinE May 18 '09 at 15:18
1  
... related to this, if System.Drawing.Pen does not use a GDI handle, what resource am I freeing by Disposing of it? Sorry if my one question has become three! –  ColinE May 18 '09 at 15:20
    
I'm actually not sure. I read somewhere, as mentioned, that there is a System.Drawing implementation using GDI, while one would typically expect System.Drawing to use GDI+. Might have been on Windows CE or something. I'm also not sure whether creating window handles (forms and controls) can increase GDI handle count. In many instances when I was leaking some kind of handles, it was because of leaked controls rather than GDI+ things. –  OregonGhost May 18 '09 at 15:20
1  
@Pen.Dispose: You are freeing the System.Drawing resource, and it is not your duty to find out what that exactly is. Can be the underlying GDI+ object, a GDI handle or some other thing. –  OregonGhost May 18 '09 at 15:21
1  
This answer is correct; although he's not sure of it :P System.Drawing.Pen is a wrapper around a GDI+ Pen (although that is an implementation detail that could change at any time). That explains why you are not seeing GDI resources being used, it's not using GDI resources. On the other hand System.Drawing.Pen does implement IDisposable, therefore are you are required to call Dispose when you are done with the object. –  Ian Boyd Jul 5 '11 at 1:53

You are not really leaking resources in your sample. Remove this code from your Load event:

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        pens.Add(new Pen(new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, i * 2, i * 2, 255 - i * 2))));
    }

Your Paint event handler should look like this:

void TestControl_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        e.Graphics.DrawLine(new Pen(new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(255, i * 2, i * 2, 255 - i * 2))), 0, i, Width, i);
    }
}

Now you will be leaking in every paint call. Start minimizing/restoring your Form and see GDI objects sky rocket...

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Hi Denis ... nice try, but have you actually tested this? I gave it a go and my application still only used a handful of GDI objects. This does not make sense! –  ColinE May 19 '09 at 7:16

I think the following blog may have answered this question:

Using GDI Objects the Right Way

The GDI objects that aren't explicitly disposed should be implicitly disposed by their finalizes. (Bob Powell has also mentioned this issue in GDI+ FAQ )

But I doubt if the CLR garbage collector can remove GDI resources so quickly that we can't even see memory usage changes from TaskManager. Maybe current GDI+ implementation doesn't use GDI.

I've tried the following piece of code to generate more GDI objects. But I still couldn't see any changes of the number of GDI handles.

void Form1_Paint(object sender, PaintEventArgs e) 
{
    Random r = new Random();
    while (true)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            e.Graphics.DrawLine(
            new Pen(new SolidBrush(Color.FromArgb(r.Next()))), 0, i, Width, i);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you want to leak a GDI object from .NET, then just create a GDI object and not release it:

[DllImport("gdi32.dll", EntryPoint="CreatePen", CharSet=CharSet.Auto, SetLastError=true, ExactSpelling=true)]
private static extern IntPtr CreatePen(int fnStyle, int nWidth, int crColor);

CreatePen(0, 0, 0); //(PS_SOLID, 0=1px wide, 0=black)

Blingo blango, you're leaking GDI pens.

i don't know why you want to create GDI leaks. But your question asked how to create GDI leaks from a WinForm - so there it is.

share|improve this answer
    
You should also mention the REASON this works in native code (P/Invoke) but not the managed GDI/GDI+ implementation. I believe it has something to do with .NET garbage collecting the GDI/GDI+ resources. –  IDWMaster Jul 6 '11 at 3:27
    
@IDWMaster: .NET garbage collector has no ability to "collect" native resource (e.g. GDI handles). Any .net code that does P/Invoke to allocate a GDI handle is also responsible for doing a P/Invoke to release them. Fortunately every object in the .NET framework takes care to do this. The garbage collector has nothing to do with that. –  Ian Boyd Jul 7 '11 at 13:27
    
The GC can call a destructor on the object though, which could; in turn free the unmanaged resource. –  IDWMaster Jul 7 '11 at 13:52
    
An object's finalizer might call .Dispose for you - but it's purely a "save-your-ass bonus" thing. It isn't required; the object author is not required to help you clean up after yourself by calling Dispose for you. Either way, it is Dispose, not the garbage collector, that is freeing managed resources. The garbage collector doesn't know how to free unmanaged resources; it doesn't even know how to call Dispose. And if the object's finalizer doesn't call Dispose then you don't even get that save-your-ass safety net. –  Ian Boyd Jul 8 '11 at 18:27

I think the compiler only use one handle.

If I in delphi create a lot of fonts I just take memory
but if I use the WinAPI CreateFont() I take GDI objects.

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Create two buttons on a form. Inside each button, add the following code. In one button, comment out the Dispose method.

    Form _test = null;
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    {
        _test = new Form();
        _test.Visible = false;
        _test.Show();
        _test.Hide();
        _test.Dispose();
    }

The button with the Dispose commented out shows you the leak. The other shows that Dispose causes the User and GDI handles to stay the same.

This is probably the best page I've found that explains it.

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