Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a class that has an unordered_set of its own type as a member. Therefore I need to write a specialization for hash<Foo>. This specialization needs to be defined after Foo is declared. But it seems to me as if I already need the specialization for hash<Foo> before defining the member unordered_set<Foo>. At least it doesn't compile and fails there. I tried a forward declaration of the hash template but couldn't get it working thereby either.

The relevant code snippet is:

class Foo {
public:
    int i;
    std::unordered_set<Foo> dummy;
    Peer(std::unordered_set<Foo>);
};

namespace std {
    template<> struct hash<Foo>
    {
        size_t operator()(const Foo& f) const
        {
            return hash<int>()(f.i);
        }
    };
}

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Foo cannot have a member variable of type std::unordered_set<Foo>.

You cannot instantiate a Standard Library container with an incomplete type. Basically, with several exceptions not relevant here, a class type is not complete until the } that terminates its definition.

You'll either need to store some other type in the container (perhaps std::unique_ptr<Foo>), or use a containers library that provides containers instantiable with an incomplete type (e.g., Boost has such a containers library).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the fast answer, then I'll try it differently –  devmapal Jan 8 '12 at 22:29
add comment

You can move the declaration around a bit to make it compile:

class Foo;

namespace std {
  template<> struct hash<Foo> {
    size_t operator()(const Foo& f) const;
  };
}

class Foo {
public:
  int i;
  std::unordered_set<Foo> dummy;
  Foo(std::unordered_set<Foo>);
};

namespace std {
  size_t hash<Foo>::operator()(const Foo& f) const {
    return hash<int>()(f.i);
  }
}

As James says, though, the declaration of dummy is is undefined behaviour.

You will also need an equality comparison; easiest to add an operator== to Foo.

I would also recommend making the constructor of Foo take the argument by const-reference.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it compiles. But as it actually shouldn't compile because it's not standart compilant I should not use it like this, right? –  devmapal Jan 8 '12 at 22:49
    
@devmapal: Absolutely right, don't use this. I just posted in in case you have other template scenarios in the future where this might apply. Note that the problem is only that the standard says you mustn't to this with standard library templates. You're free to do this with your own templates if you can prove that it does the right thing. –  Kerrek SB Jan 8 '12 at 22:53
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.