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I have a contenteditable div and when you type in it, after 2 seconds I try to change its background color.

This is my code:

function changeFn(){
      $(this).css('background','red')
      console.log($(this).attr('id'));
   } 
var timer;

    $("div.content").on("keypress paste", function () { 

        clearTimeout(timer);
          timer = setTimeout(changeFn, 2000)
    });

It seems that I have to pass $(this) to the function because it doesn't recognize which $this is.

When I set the background-color change inside the keypress function it works.

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/uc8Tg/

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use jQuery.proxy, which sets the context of a function:

function changeFn() {
    $(this).css('background', 'red');
}
var timer;

$("div.content").on("keypress paste", function() {

    clearTimeout(timer);
    timer = setTimeout($.proxy(changeFn, this), 2000);
});

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/uc8Tg/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. Once again Ive learned something new from you. –  jQuerybeast Jan 9 '12 at 1:00
    
@jQuerybeast: Glad to help, as always! –  Andrew Whitaker Jan 9 '12 at 1:01
function changeFn(){
    $(this).css('background','red')
    console.log($(this).attr('id'));
} 
var timer;
$("div.content").on("keypress paste", function () { 
    clearTimeout(timer);
    var self = this;
    timer = setTimeout(function(){changeFn.call(self)}, 2000)
});

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Function/call

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Thank you. I will be using Andrew's answer as it uses less coding –  jQuerybeast Jan 9 '12 at 1:02
    
But it is slower –  Ivan Castellanos Jan 9 '12 at 1:44
    
Is it really slower? –  jQuerybeast Jan 9 '12 at 8:18
    
I mean slower in the technical sense of the word, not that you can really notice: "Call" is a native javascript method for every function; check how inside jQuery he is just doing a lot of things and then, at the end it uses "apply" (wich is just like "call" but that accepts an array to create the arguments) jsapi.info/jquery/1.7/jQuery.proxy –  Ivan Castellanos Jan 9 '12 at 8:34

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