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I'm trying to get my head around the best way to construct a relationship that maps many Constants to many Items.

My initial relationship, an Item has a Constant, looked like this.

class Constant(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Constant"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    name = Column(String(64), nullable=False)

class Item(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Item"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    constantId = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"))
    constant = relationship("Constant")

However, I really need my item to have more than one constant, something like this...

class Item(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Item"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    constant1Id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"))
    constant1 = relationship("Constant")
    constant2Id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"))
    constant2 = relationship("Constant")

My first attempt was to use an association table...

item_to_constant_assoc = Table("itemToConstantAssoc", Base.metadata, Column("constantId", Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"), Column("itemId", Integer, ForeignKey("Item.id")))

while updating the Item class accordingly:

Class Item(Base):
__tablename__ = "Item"
id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
constant1 = relationship("Constant", secondary=item_to_constant_assoc, uselist=False)
constant2 = relationship("Constant", secondary=item_to_constant_assoc, uselist=False)

This failed (understandably when looking at the MySQL tables that were created) because Item.constant1 and Item.constant2 referred to the same entry in the association table.

My next step is to add another association table for the second constant but I have to wonder whether I'm barking up the wrong tree as I seem to be creating a large number of tables for a relatively simple mapping. I've read the documentation. It is detailed and substantial (thanks Michael Bayer!) and I may have just overlooked a section. Could anyone provide me with a few pointers either to this problem, or what I should be looking for in the docs?

Thanks! Phil

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The description of your problem is excessively abstract. Please explain the problem you are trying to solve more clearly, so we can give an answer that is meaningful. –  IfLoop Jan 9 '12 at 2:39
    
@TokenMacGuy This is probably less abstract from the actual problem that I'm trying to solve than you think. I have a table of Constants in the domain of video editing (e.g. the constant named "FPS23976" defines a frame rate of 23.976 fps). The Item table defines a recording device. This has both a capture rate and a playback rate, both of which I'd like to reference the Constant table. Apologies if I'm mis-stating the problem. This is not my area of expertise. My question boils down to: "Is multiple association tables the best way to construct these relationships?" –  Phil Boltt Jan 9 '12 at 2:56
    
@PhilBoltt: Please post clarification as an update to the question. Not a comment. But a first-class update, so that the question is one, integrated whole. Not a bunch of ideas in question plus comments. –  S.Lott Jan 9 '12 at 10:51
    
Cameras and framerates are quite concrete, much more so than items and constants! –  IfLoop Jan 9 '12 at 13:54
    
@TokenMacGuy Point taken. Thanks for your input. –  Phil Boltt Jan 9 '12 at 19:37
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2 Answers 2

Couldn't see the wood for the trees. This is easily accomplished by using the primaryjoin argument on the relationship.

class Item(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Item"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    constant1Id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"))
    constant1 = relationship("Constant", primaryjoin="Constant.id==Item.constant1Id")
    constant2Id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"))
    constant2 = relationship("Constant", primaryjoin="Constant.id==Item.constant2Id")
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A many-to-many association already allows each Item to have an unlimited number of constants. You don't need anything more than this as your two base tables.

class Constant(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Constant"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    name = Column(String(64), nullable=False)

class Item(Base):
    __tablename__ = "Item"
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True, autoincrement=True)
    name = Column(String(64), nullable=False)    

item_to_constant_assoc = Table("itemToConstantAssoc", Base.metadata, Column("constantId", Integer, ForeignKey("Constant.id"), Column("itemId", Integer, ForeignKey("Item.id")))

At this point, every Item has an unlimited number of Constants. When you want a specific constant, you have to query the constant by the name attribute in the Constant table. Your association table is merely a list of key pairs: (itemID, constantId).

The set of all Constants for an Item is a three-table join for all association rows joined with matching Constant rows for a given Item.

The set of all Items for a Constant is a three-table join for all association rows join with match Item rows for a given Constant.

A specific Constant for an Item needs to be retrieved via a join. You think of it like the the set of all Constants for a given Item where both the Item and the Constant name are given. The SQL involves a join even though only a single row is retrieved.

I think your generic query to associate a constant with all relevant items or an item with all relevant constants will look something like this.

  query(Item). join(item_to_constant_assoc.itemId==Item.itemId). join(item_to_constant_assoc.contantId==Constant.constantId
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Thanks Steven. That does make the role of the association table clearer for me. –  Phil Boltt Jan 9 '12 at 19:41
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