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I am programming a robot in C, and I have run into a problem I can't seem to figure out.

The only way to solve this problem would be to use a lot of goto statements. I am trying to figure out a way to save myself writing over 100 goto points and statements and if statements, etc. and am wondering if there is a way to goto the value of a string. for example-

string Next = "beginning";
goto Next;
beginning:

Is there any way to goto the value of Next, or to substitute in the value of Next into the goto statement?

If there is a way to do this, then I will be able to just change the value of Next for each driving command, and then goto whatever the value of the string Next is.

In other words, just converting the string to a goto identifier, or substituting it in place of one.

Thanks for the help!

-EDIT-

A lot of you guys are suggesting the use of switch statements. I am not sure this would work because of how i have it programmed. The structure of the program is here-- by the way this code only includes a little of what i actually have, my real code is over 500 lines so far. Also, the driving commands are majorly simplified. but the basic concept is here, easier to understand than what i wouldve had.

task main()
{
  //integer list
  int forwardDrivingSelector = 0;
  int backwardDrivingSelector = 0;
  int rightRotatingSelector = 0;
  string nextCommand;
  int waitTime = 0;
  int countup = 0;

  //driving commands

  driveForward:
  while(forwardDrivingSelector == 1)
  {
    motor[leftMotor] = 127;
    motor[rightMotor] = 127;
    countup++;
    wait1Msec(1);
    if(countup == waitTime)
    {
      countup = 0;
      goto nextCommand;
    }
  }
  driveBackward:
  while(backwardDrivingSelector == 1)
  {
    motor[leftMotor] = -127;
    motor[rightMotor] = 127;
    countup++;
    wait1Msec(1);
    if(countup == waitTime)
    {
      countup = 0;
      goto nextCommand;
    }
  }
  rightRotate:
  while(rightRotatingSelector == 1)
  {
    motor[leftMotor] = 127;
    motor[rightMotor] = -127;
    countup++;
    wait1Msec(1);
    if(countup == waitTime)
    {
      countup = 0;
      goto nextCommand;
    }
  }

  //autonomous driving code

  //first command, drive forward for 1000 milliseconds
  forwardDrivingSelector = 1;
  nextCommand = "secondCommand";
  waitTime = 1000;
  goto driveForward;

  secondCommand:
  forwardDrivingSelector = 0;

  //second command, rotate right for 600 milliseconds
  rightRotatingSelector = 1;
  nextCommand = "thirdCommand";
  waitTime = 600;
  goto rightRotate;

  thirdCommand:
  rightRotatingSelector = 0;

  //third command, drive backwards for 750 milliseconds
  backwardDrivingSelector = 1;
  nextCommand = "end";
  waitTime = 750;
  goto driveBackward;

  end:
  backwardDrivingSelector = 0;

}

so. how this works. i have a list of integers, including driving command selectors, the countup and waitTime integers, and the string that i was talking about, nextCommand. next comes the driving commands. in my real code, i have about 30 commands, and they are all hooked up to a remote control and its over 400 lines for just the driving commands. next comes the autonomous code. the reason i set it up like this is so that the autonomous code part would be, short, simple, and to the point. pretty much to add a command to the driving code, you turn on the selector, tell the nextCommand string what the next command is, set the waitTime (which is how long it does the command, in milliseconds), then you make the code goto the driving command which you are putting in. the driving command drives for the amount of time you put in, then does goto nextCommand;

This would all theoretically work if there was a way to make the goto statement 'interpret' the string as an identifier so it can be changed.

There are about 4 simple ways i can think of right now that could get past this easily, but they would make the code really really long and cluttered.

Now that you have a better understanding of my question, any more input? :)

btw - i am using a program called robotC, and i am programming a vex robot. so i HAVE to use plain, basic, C, and i cant use any addons or anything... which is another reason this is complicated because i cant have multiple classes and stuff like that...

share|improve this question
3  
There has got to be a better way to do what you're doing than 100 gotos... –  Mysticial Jan 9 '12 at 3:17
1  
What is the actual problem? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 9 '12 at 3:18
1  
If you could describe the root problem, someone may find a better way than these gotos –  Kevin Jan 9 '12 at 3:20
    
The actual code that i have to program is a 60 second long autonomous driving code that is really complicated and will have over 100 commands, because of the competition. the second 60 seconds of the competition is user controlled, and that code is really easy to program. its the autonomous code that is long –  user1137900 Jan 11 '12 at 2:35

7 Answers 7

As an extension to the C language, GCC provides a feature called computed gotos, which allow you to goto a label computed at runtime. However, I strongly recommend you reconsider your design.

Instead of using gotos with over a hundred labels (which will easily lead to unmaintainable spaghetti code), consider instead using function pointers. The code will be much more structured and maintainable.

share|improve this answer

Instead of goto's, I'd call one of 100 functions. While C won't handle the conversion from string to function for you, it's pretty easy to use a sorted array of structs:

struct fn {
    char name[whatever];
    void (*func)(void);
};

Then do (for example) a binary search through the array to find the function that matches a string.

Also note that many real systems provide things like GetProcAddress (Windows) or dlsym (Unix/Linux) to handle some of the work for you.

share|improve this answer

You're thinking about this the wrong way. Each of the actions you need to call should be a function, then you can choose which function should be called next by inspecting a "next" variable.

This could be a string as you've mentioned, but you might be best using a enumerated type to make readable, but more efficient code.

The alternative, though probably overkill, would be to ensure your functions all use the same parameters and return types, and then use a function pointer to track which piece of code should be executed next.

Small tip: If you ever think you need more than 1 goto statement to achieve a certain goal you're probably not looking at the best solution.

share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think your suggested alternative is overkill. If he has 100 functions but no way to unify how they are called then he may as well just have 100 if blocks. –  dreamlax Jan 9 '12 at 3:27

You need to step back and consider other solutions for the problem you are trying to solve. One of them might look like this:

void DoSomething() {
    printf("Something\n");
}

void DoSomethingElse() {
    printf("Something else\n");
}

void (*nextStep)(void) = NULL;

nextStep = DoSomething;
nextStep();
nextStep = DoSomethingElse;
nextStep();

See it in action.

share|improve this answer

How about a switch? Either use an int/enum/whatever or inspect the value of the string (loop over it and strcmp, for instance) to figure out the destination.

const char *dsts[n_dsts] = {"beginning","middle",...};
...
int i;
for(i = 0; i < n_dsts; i++) if(strcmp(dsts[i]) == 0) break;
switch(i) {
    case 0: // whatever
    case 1: // whatever
    ...
        break;
    default: // Error, dest not found
}
share|improve this answer

Firstly, let me preface this by agreeing with everyone else: this is probably not the right way to go about what you're trying to do. In particular, I think you probably want a finite-state machine, and I recommend this article for guidelines on how to do that.

That said . . . you can more or less do this by using a switch statement. For example:

Next = BEGINNING;
HelperLabel:
switch(Next)
{
   case BEGINNING:
     .
     .
     .
     Next = CONTINUING;
     goto HelperLabel;
   case ENDING:
     .
     .
     .
     break;
   case CONTINUING:
     .
     .
     .
     Next = ENDING;
     goto HelperLabel;
}

(Note that a switch statement requires integers or integer-like values rather than strings, but you can use an enum to create those integers in a straightforward way.)

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duff's_device for the original, canonical example of using switch/case as a goto.

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of goto HelperLabel, why not just stick the switch statement in a loop and use break instead? –  dreamlax Jan 9 '12 at 3:29
    
@dreamlax: Good idea; done. I guess I was thinking that the various cases would need to be interleaved with other control structures (which goto allows and break does not) -- otherwise why did the OP want goto in the first place? -- but since that wasn't explicitly specified, yeah, it's probably best to start with the slightly-cleaner approach. –  ruakh Jan 9 '12 at 3:35
    
Exactly, it is interweaved with other control structures, which is why i am using goto –  user1137900 Jan 11 '12 at 2:57
    
@user1137900: O.K. then, I've restored the version of my answer that allowed other control structures to be interleaved. –  ruakh Jan 11 '12 at 3:03
    
ruakh, your coding would be perfect IF my driving code was all in one section. It splits into 2 sections, the first section has all the driving commands (forward, left etc.), and the second section refers to the first section multiple times for different commands (go forward first, then go left second, then etc.) –  user1137900 Jan 11 '12 at 3:32
#define GOTO_HELPER(str, label) \
    if (strcmp(str, #label) == 0) goto label;

#define GOTO(str) do { \
    GOTO_HELPER(str, beginning) \
    GOTO_HELPER(str, end) \
    } while (0)


int main (int argc, char ** argv) {
    GOTO("end");
beginning:
    return 1;
end:
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

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