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ORIGINAL QUESTION:

i am studying js and i would like to know if there is any (useful) difference between these two ways of protecting the global scope other than the fact that the second one can be reused (called again).

option1:

var question = {};
(function(){ 
    question.option1 = function() {
        // some code
    };
})();

option2:

var question = {};
question.option2 = function () {
    //some code
};
question.option();

thanks!

EDIT 1:

thank you @luisperezphd. is there any difference between what you wrote and this (besides verbosity)?

var question = {};
question.option3 = {};
question.option3.privateVar = 0;
question.option3.testing = function () {
    question.option3.privateVar++;
    // some code
};
question.option3.testing();

EDIT 2:

thank you lanston and luisperezphd! i did not realize that question.option3.privateVar was available in the global.

is there any difference between this:

var question = {};
(function(){
    var privateVar = "some value";
    question.option4 = function(){
        alert(privateVar);
    }
})();
question.option4();

and this:

var question = {};
question.option5 = function() {
    var privateVar = "some value";
    var someFunction = function() { 
        alert(privateVar);
    }
    return someFunction;
}
question.option5()();

?

share|improve this question
    
Their behaviour is same, I believe the second one is referred to as a closure. But in both cases privateVar is not accessible outside the function. –  luisperezphd Jan 10 '12 at 5:43

2 Answers 2

There is no difference in the example you gave, but there is a difference you haven't exploited. In the first example you can utilize variables and not pollute the global name space or the object namespace. The equivalent of a private field in most object orientated languages. You would do that like so:

var question = {};
(function(){ 
    var PrivateVariable = 0;
    question.option1 = function() {
        PrivateVariable++;
        // some code
    };
})();

alert(question.PrivateVariable); // returns 'undefined'

The reason the code above returns undefined is because PrivateVariable is not a field in question. But functions in question can access PrivateVariable. This is truly a private variable.

On the other had if you wrote it like this:

var question = {};
question.PrivateVariable = 0;
question.option1 = function() {
    question.PrivateVariable++;
    // some code
};

alert(question.PrivateVariable); // returns 0

In this second case PrivateVariable is in fact not private and publicly accessible.

Incidentally you normally wouldn't reference question from inside a function that belongs you question. Instead you would use the this keyword, like so:

var question = {};
question.PrivateVariable = 0;
question.option1 = function() {
    this.PrivateVariable++;
    // some code
};

But this would only work on public variables. It makes it more clear what is going on. Also in some cases it makes maintaining the code easier in that if you change the name of the variable from question you wouldn't have to change references to it inside the function. There are other benefits but I don't know if I should get into it here.

If this answers you question, please accept it as an answer.

Thank you.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! please, see clarifying question above. –  svdsvd Jan 9 '12 at 7:28
    
I updated my answer to more directly answer your question based on your clarification. –  luisperezphd Jan 9 '12 at 21:38
    
thank you. we are getting there. i was not asking the right questions to figure out what i need to know -- sorry! see second edit. –  svdsvd Jan 10 '12 at 3:38

@svdsvd,It's quite different between liusperezphd's and yours, the PrivateVariable,you can't get it in the global,but you can get your question.option3.privateVar in the global

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! i did not realize this at first. i am after exploring the different ways of creating private variables within a namespace. i rephrased my question again... –  svdsvd Jan 10 '12 at 3:41

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