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I want to be able to take a device name (eg: /dev/disk2) and determine where (if anywhere) it's mounted (eg: /mnt/cdrom or /Volumes/RANDLABEL) in Python.

One way I can do this is to run df or mount and then parse the output, but this seems pretty cheesy and unreliable. For example, mount uses " on " as the delimiter between the device and the mountpoint. While very unlikely, either of these could potentially include that very string, making the output ambiguous.

On Linux I could read /proc/mounts, but this won't work on Mac OS X, for example.

So I'm looking for a way to find the mountpoint for a device in a way that's reliable (ie: can deal with arbitrary (legal) device/mountpoint names) and is "as portable as possible". (I'm guessing that portability to Windows might not be possible -- I'm not sure if it even has an analogous concept of device mountpoints.) I particularly want something that will work on both Linux and OS X.

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1  
Remember that the same device can have more than one name, and - on some platforms - more than one mountpoint. –  Zanchey Jan 9 '12 at 8:03
    
@Zanchey That's fine. I just need to find any mountpoint given the device name. –  Laurence Gonsalves Jan 10 '12 at 18:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(From my comment above: mtab is the standard Linux way. It doesn't exist on FreeBSD, Mac OS X or Solaris. The former two have the getfsstat(2) and getmntinfo(2) system calls; on Solaris you can use getmntent(3C). Unfortunately the list of currently-mounted filesystems is not defined by POSIX AFAIK, so it is wildly different on different platforms.)

There's the experimental mount module in the PSI package from PyPI, which appears to attempt to bundle all the platform-specific methods into a simple abstraction, and which is advertised as working on Mac OS X (Darwin), AIX, Linux and Solaris. The Darwin module probably works on *BSD.

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There really isn't a portable way to do this so you'll need to deal with platform-specific code.

On OS X, the simplest and most reliable way to get disk volume information at the command level is to use the -plist option for diskutil list. The output can then be processed directly in Python with the plistlib module. For example:

diskutil list -plist | \
   python -c 'import sys,plistlib,pprint; pprint.pprint(plistlib.readPlist(sys.stdin))'
{'AllDisks': ['disk0', 'disk0s1', 'disk0s2', 'disk0s3', 'disk1'],
 'AllDisksAndPartitions': [{'Content': 'GUID_partition_scheme',
                            'DeviceIdentifier': 'disk0',
                            'Partitions': [{'Content': 'EFI',
                                            'DeviceIdentifier': 'disk0s1',
                                            'Size': 209715200},
                                           {'Content': 'Apple_CoreStorage',
                                            'DeviceIdentifier': 'disk0s2',
                                            'Size': 499248103424},
                                           {'Content': 'Apple_Boot',
                                            'DeviceIdentifier': 'disk0s3',
                                            'Size': 650002432,
                                            'VolumeName': 'Recovery HD'}],
                            'Size': 500107862016},
                           {'Content': 'Apple_HFSX',
                            'DeviceIdentifier': 'disk1',
                            'MountPoint': '/',
                            'Size': 499097100288,
                            'VolumeName': 'main'}],
 'VolumesFromDisks': ['main'],
 'WholeDisks': ['disk0', 'disk1']}
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I don't think this works in OS X, but one way in Linux to programmatically get if a device is mounted and on which paths is through the dbus org.freedesktop.UDisks.Device interface:

import sys, dbus

device_name = sys.argv[1]

bus = dbus.SystemBus()
ud_manager_obj = bus.get_object("org.freedesktop.UDisks", "/org/freedesktop/UDisks")
ud_manager = dbus.Interface(ud_manager_obj, 'org.freedesktop.UDisks')

device = bus.get_object('org.freedesktop.UDisks',
                        '/org/freedesktop/UDisks/devices/{0}'.format(device_name))
device_properties = dbus.Interface(device, dbus.PROPERTIES_IFACE)
if device_properties.Get('org.freedesktop.UDisks.Device', 'DeviceIsMounted'):
    for mount_path in device_properties.Get('org.freedesktop.UDisks.Device', 'DeviceMountPaths'):
        print mount_path
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What about reading /etc/mtab and /etc/fstab?

I don't know OSX, but that's the standard Unix way to know what is mounted where. mtab should list all mounted filesystems, fstab should list all predefined mountpoints (which may or may not actually be mounted).

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Well, it's the standard Linux way. mtab doesn't exist on FreeBSD, Mac OS X or Solaris. The former two have the getfsstat(2) and getmntinfo(2) system calls; on Solaris you can use getmntent(3C). Unfortunately the list of currently-mounted filesystems is not defined by POSIX AFAIK, so it is wildly different on different platforms. –  Zanchey Jan 9 '12 at 8:29

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