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I'm looking to run a mysql_query() that allows me to create a new table within a database and name it according to the current date and time.

Example: Create a table named 2012-01-09-03-00-00, or something along those lines.

I know that this is not an optimal way of doing things, but ultimately I'm going to take the data on this table and dump it into a bigger database.

I've tried the code:

<?php
$date = date('YmdHis', time()-(3600*5));
$exportSQL = "CREATE TABLE $date(
FirstName varchar(15)
)";
mysql_select_db($database);
mysql_query($exportSQL) or die (mysql_error());
echo "Table created!";
?>

But this has been to no good. Please Help and thanks in advance.

EDIT: THIS HAS BEEN SOLVED. THE CODE WORKING SHOULD LOOK LIKE THIS:

<?php
$date = date('YmdHis', time()-(3600*5));
$exportSQL = "CREATE TABLE `$date`(
FirstName varchar(15)
)";
mysql_select_db($database);
mysql_query($exportSQL) or die (mysql_error());
echo "Table created!";
?>
share|improve this question
    
Will the database be normalized after you do that? –  Big Fat Pig Jan 9 '12 at 8:05
    
+1 nice question –  Amit Yadav Jan 9 '12 at 8:57

1 Answer 1

Except that it is very weird design, if you want to name table in such a way - place its name in square brackets, like this:

CREATE TABLE [2012-01-09 12:20:15.010] (your columns)

that means that you should have the name of the table BEFORE composing the query, OR you have to use dynamic sql like this:

DECLARE @sql NVARCHAR(MAX)
SET @sql = N'CREATE TABLE['+
  CAST(DATEPART(year, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+N'-'+
  CAST(DATEPART(month, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+N'-'+
  CAST(DATEPART(day, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+N'-'+
  CAST(DATEPART(hour, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+N'-'+
  CAST(DATEPART(minute, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+N'-'+
  CAST(DATEPART(second, GETDATE()) AS NVARCHAR)+
  N'] (FirstName varchar(15))'

EXEC(@sql)

The presented syntax is for sql server, so due to the sql compliance you can replace square brackets with double quotes and use proper date functions, but the approach left just the same

share|improve this answer
1  
do you mean backtics (`) I don't think MySQL uses square brackets like MSSQL and others do. Ditto for Dynamic SQL –  codeXtre.me Jan 9 '12 at 8:09
    
Sorry for misunderstanding, i read with mistake mysql as mssql. Little bit commented an answer at its end –  Oleg Dok Jan 9 '12 at 8:15
1  
+1 for "very weird design" –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 9 '12 at 8:27
    
@M_M: only SQL Server uses the strange brackets as a replacement for the standard double quotes –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 9 '12 at 8:28
    
@a_horse_with_no_name I've seen them in access too (though access barely qualifies as a DB...) either way I should have qualified that statement better. –  codeXtre.me Jan 9 '12 at 8:33

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