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How can I have lowercase, plus underscore if possible, routes in ASP.NET MVC? So that I would have /dinners/details/2 call DinnersController.Details(2) and, if possible, /dinners/more_details/2 call DinnersController.MoreDetails(2)?

All this while still using patterns like {controller}/{action}/{id}.

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I ended up writing all my routes manually anyway for various reasons and I think it's hard to avoid doing that with anything that's not just CRUD. So I just wrote them in lowercase. – Pablo Aug 18 '09 at 12:04
    
Using Web Forms? Go here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…. (I am gradually converting my project from web forms to MVC and have both in the project) – Jess Mar 11 at 14:16

With System.Web.Routing 4.5 you may implement this straightforward by setting LowercaseUrls property of RouteCollection:

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

        routes.LowercaseUrls = true;

        routes.MapRoute(
            name: "Default",
            url: "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
            defaults: new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
        );
    }

Also assuming you are doing this for SEO reasons you want to redirect incoming urls to lowercase (as said in many of the links off this article).

protected void Application_BeginRequest(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
  //You don't want to redirect on posts, or images/css/js
  bool isGet = HttpContext.Current.Request.RequestType.ToLowerInvariant().Contains("get");
  if (isGet && HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.AbsolutePath.Contains(".") == false)    
  {
     string lowercaseURL = (Request.Url.Scheme + "://" + HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.Authority + HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.AbsolutePath);
     if (Regex.IsMatch(lowercaseURL, @"[A-Z]"))
     {
      //You don't want to change casing on query strings
      lowercaseURL = lowercaseURL.ToLower() + HttpContext.Current.Request.Url.Query;

      Response.Clear();
      Response.Status = "301 Moved Permanently";
      Response.AddHeader("Location", lowercaseURL); 
      Response.End();
    }
 }
}
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2  
This is by far the simplest thing to do in 4.0. – Tragedian Dec 10 '12 at 10:41
    
any way to override on case by case basic for instance upper case SKU or a CamelCase product name? – Simon_Weaver Jun 24 '13 at 2:32
1  
Wish this were at the top... Almost cargo-culted a lot of code! – akatakritos Jul 20 '14 at 5:44
    
Great answer :-) The latter SEO part fits nicely into an HTTP module. – David Kirkland Sep 8 '14 at 0:07
    
@Aaron Sherman Where is the Application_BeginRequest part supposted to go? It's giving me errors when its inside public class RouteConfig and also when its outside of if. – Richard Mišenčík Jun 2 '15 at 16:10

These two tutorials helped when I wanted to do the same thing and work well:

http://www.coderjournal.com/2008/03/force-mvc-route-url-lowercase/ http://goneale.com/2008/12/19/lowercase-route-urls-in-aspnet-mvc/

EDIT: For projects with areas, you need to modify the GetVirtualPath() method:

public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
{
  var lowerCaseValues = new RouteValueDictionary();

  foreach (var v in values)
  {
    switch (v.Key.ToUpperInvariant())
    {
      case "ACTION":
      case "AREA":
      case "CONTROLLER":
        lowerCaseValues.Add(v.Key, ((string)v.Value).ToLowerInvariant());
        break;
      default:
        lowerCaseValues.Add(v.Key.ToLowerInvariant(), v.Value);
        break;
    }
  }
  return base.GetVirtualPath(requestContext, lowerCaseValues);
}
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1  
Cheers for the mention. – GONeale Jul 30 '09 at 1:30
1  
Actually the Wordpress link (@GoNeale's article) is superior. It provides extension methods for a friendlier registration, and includes handling to redirect incoming requests that aren't in lower case, so that you don't fragment your page ranking in search engines between multiple versions of the same page. – Drew Noakes Sep 7 '10 at 22:42
9  
GONeale link has changed; URL is now goneale.com/2008/12/19/lowercase-route-urls-in-aspnet-mvc – Daniel Liuzzi Jan 14 '11 at 3:45
4  
@Derek - Nope, the tutorials break down when using Area's. After 3 days of trying EVERYTHING... I found a better solution, theres a library called Attribute Routing. Solves the problem and makes life a lot easier. philliphaydon.com/2011/08/… – Phill Aug 9 '11 at 22:32
5  
For mvc 4 there is a better solution using property routes.LowercaseUrls = true; More info on dhuvelle.com/2012/11/tips-for-aspnet-mvc-4-lowercase-urls.html – Marc Cals Nov 23 '12 at 9:27

If you are using the UrlHelper to generate the link, you can simply specify the name of the action and controller as lowercase:

itemDelete.NavigateUrl = Url.Action("delete", "photos", new { key = item.Key });

Results in: /media/photos/delete/64 (even though my controller and action are pascal case).

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10  
I think doing this work in one central location is the easiest and most standard solution. This is just as bad as inline CSS. (Apparently 15 people use inline CSS). – The Muffin Man Jun 25 '12 at 22:20

I found this at Nick Berardi’s Coder Journal, but it did not have information on how to implement the LowercaseRoute class. Hence reposting here with additional information.

First extend the Route class to LowercaseRoute

public class LowercaseRoute : Route
{
    public LowercaseRoute(string url, IRouteHandler routeHandler)
        : base(url, routeHandler) { }
    public LowercaseRoute(string url, RouteValueDictionary defaults, IRouteHandler routeHandler)
        : base(url, defaults, routeHandler) { }
    public LowercaseRoute(string url, RouteValueDictionary defaults, RouteValueDictionary constraints, IRouteHandler routeHandler)
        : base(url, defaults, constraints, routeHandler) { }
    public LowercaseRoute(string url, RouteValueDictionary defaults, RouteValueDictionary constraints, RouteValueDictionary dataTokens, IRouteHandler routeHandler) : base(url, defaults, constraints, dataTokens, routeHandler) { }
    public override VirtualPathData GetVirtualPath(RequestContext requestContext, RouteValueDictionary values)
    {
        VirtualPathData path = base.GetVirtualPath(requestContext, values);

        if (path != null)
            path.VirtualPath = path.VirtualPath.ToLowerInvariant();

        return path;
    }
}

Then modify the RegisterRoutes method of Global.asax.cs

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.Add(new LowercaseRoute("{controller}/{action}/{id}", 
        new RouteValueDictionary(new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }), 
        new MvcRouteHandler()));

    //routes.MapRoute(
    //    "Default",                                              // Route name
    //    "{controller}/{action}/{id}",                           // URL with parameters
    //    new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }  // Parameter defaults
    //);
}

I would however like to know a way to use routes.MapRoute...

share|improve this answer
    
GONeale's article provides an extension method so you can write routes.MapRouteLowercase(... which is nicer than the above: goneale.wordpress.com/2008/12/19/… – Drew Noakes Sep 8 '10 at 12:58
1  
GONeale's entire blog disappeared. Here is another blog entry with similar content (and the same extension method). It addresses this situation in the context of reducing duplicate content. – patridge Apr 29 '11 at 2:45

You can continue use the MapRoute syntax by adding this class as an extension to RouteCollection:

public static class RouteCollectionExtension
{
    public static Route MapRouteLowerCase(this RouteCollection routes, string name, string url, object defaults)
    {
        return routes.MapRouteLowerCase(name, url, defaults, null);
    }

    public static Route MapRouteLowerCase(this RouteCollection routes, string name, string url, object defaults, object constraints)
    {
        Route route = new LowercaseRoute(url, new MvcRouteHandler())
        {
            Defaults = new RouteValueDictionary(defaults),
            Constraints = new RouteValueDictionary(constraints)
        };

        routes.Add(name, route);

        return route;
    }
}

Now you can use in your application's startup "MapRouteLowerCase" instead of "MapRoute":

    public void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
    {
        routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

        // Url shortcuts
        routes.MapRouteLowerCase("Home", "", new { controller = "Home", action = "Index" });
        routes.MapRouteLowerCase("Login", "login", new { controller = "Account", action = "Login" });
        routes.MapRouteLowerCase("Logout", "logout", new { controller = "Account", action = "Logout" });

        routes.MapRouteLowerCase(
            "Default",                                              // Route name
            "{controller}/{action}/{id}",                           // URL with parameters
            new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = "" }  // Parameter defaults
        );
    }
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For anyone reading this, the LowercaseRoute class in the first code snippet above appears to come from this other answer – chue x Jun 30 '14 at 14:55

This actually has two answers:

  1. You can already do this: the route engine does case-insensitive comparison. If you type a lower-case route, it will be routed to the appropriate controller and action.
  2. If you are using controls that generate route links (ActionLink, RouteLink, etc.) they will produce mixed-case links unless you override this default behavior.

You're on your own for the underscores, though...

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Could you use the ActionName attribute?

 [ActionName("more_details")]
 public ActionResult MoreDetails(int? page)
 {

 }

I don't think case matters. More_Details, more_DETAILS, mOrE_DeTaILs in the URL all take you to the same Controller Action.

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I haven't tried that - will it let you use either one? ("moredetails" or "more_details") – GalacticCowboy May 18 '09 at 22:07
    
To follow up, I tried it and it requires you to use the specified name, so no, it won't allow you to handle it either way. Also, depending how you constructed your controller action and view, you may need to specify the name of the view explicitly. – GalacticCowboy May 19 '09 at 14:08

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