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I am new to the usage of iterators. I have used the below code, where I parse through all the elements in the list using iterator, to determine whether the element exists in the list or not.

list<int> pendingRsp;
list<int>::iterator it1;

for(int i = 1; i <= 5; i++)
   pendingRsp.push_back(i *10);

for(it1 = pendingRsp.begin(); it1 != pendingRsp.end(); it1++)
{
   if((*it1) == 50)
   {
      found = true;   
      break;
   }
}

The code works fine, but I am getting the below Lint warning:

Info 1702: operator 'operator!=' is both an ordinary function 'operator!=(const pair<<1>,<2>> &, const pair<<1>,<2>> &)' and a member function 'list::const_iterator::operator!=(const const_iterator &) const'

What does the above warning mean? Is it conflict between operator overloading implementation of != operator in list and iterator?

share|improve this question
    
Nothing to do with the question, but use std::find instead of the for loop. – Jesse Good Jan 9 '12 at 9:34
    
Yeah std::find is a better one. Thanks for the suggestion – inquisitive Jan 9 '12 at 9:43
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It means precisely what it says. The list iterator is a pair and pair has an operator!= function, but the list iterator class also has its own operator!= function. Since both operators do precisely the same thing (because any two pairs that match on the first element match on the second as well), you can safely ignore the warning.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply – inquisitive Jan 9 '12 at 9:42
    
And that's why we use composition, not public inheritance ;-) – Steve Jessop Jan 9 '12 at 9:52

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