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I've recently started learning html and php. I'd appreciate it if someone could point me in the right direction: I've made a basic webpage that has basic authentication (to enter it). When the user clicks the cancel button, I would like the browser to do something! All it does is, remain on the page it was on (before the user attempted to access my page). I guess I would like it to display the 401 error. Is the only way to do this, to insert text after:

header('www-authenticate: basic');

?

I've tried redirecting 401 errors in the .htaccess file, though it would seem that the 401 error never occurs (although the server access log says that there was a 401 error). When I redirected my 404 error using .htaccess, it worked.

This is the code that I've got for the authentication:

<?php
$user = array('Michael' => 'Mike');
$pass = array('Michael' => 'fish');
$userSuccess = false;
$passSuccess = false;

if(!isset($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_USER']) && !isset($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_PW']))
{
    header('http/1.1 401 Unauthorized');
    header('www-authenticate: basic');
    exit;
}
else
{
    foreach($user as $value)
        if($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_USER'] == $value)
            $userSuccess = true;
    foreach($pass as $value)
        if($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_PW'] == $value)
            $passSuccess = true;

    if(!$userSuccess || !$passSuccess)
    {
        header('http/1.1 401 Unauthorized');
        header('www-authenticate: basic');
        exit;
    }
}
?>

Also, if I've done anything stupid in my code, feel free to point it out.

I thought that since I sent the 401 header to the server, and the server logged having received it, it would've displayed some text say, 'Error 401: Unauthorised Access' or something along those lines.

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you need to serve the browser with the content for 401. This is not done automatically. The 401 header you send is never really seen by the user. Think of it more as a status flag than content. Programs use that header to detect certain issues and act upon them (i.e. a download manager may detect the 404 header which then shows the download line in its window with a red background and error symbol).

In conclusion then, you need to print the error to the browser yourself

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply. It mostly makes sense. I'm curious, if I create a link in my webpage to another page or file that doesn't exist, it returns that the page was not found or the file was not found. I didn't tell it to return this. Why is it, that if it cannot find something, it tells the user; however, if the user's authentication fails, it doesn't tell the user? Thanks again for your reply. –  Jean-Luc Jan 9 '12 at 11:14
    
When you get a 404 error page, apache (or whichever http web server you are using) is the one which sets the 404 header status and outputs the error page content. You can even change the error content by editing the html of the error document or creating a new error document and telling apache (via htaccess for example) to use your new script as the 404 content page –  Lee Jan 9 '12 at 11:30
    
Perhaps I have misunderstood. It's Apache that's creating the 404 error page itself by some default in-built thing it has? One would think that it would do the same thing when it receives a 401 status code. –  Jean-Luc Jan 9 '12 at 12:17
    
Yes, when you request a file that does not exist, apache knows the file does not exist and will throw out the 404 header and page (unless configured otherwise). The same when you use the htaccess control for user authentication, if you fail to use a valid user/pass you get the forbidden error. Because you are taking over control of authentication via the php script, you must therefore do all this yourself. When you set the header, your NOT telling apache, your telling the user. You can set whatever error you like if you are doing it manually and apache will serve it. –  Lee Jan 9 '12 at 16:32
    
If you have firebug, check out the "net" tab and your request. it will have "200 OK" fwhen there is no issue, for your request you should see a "401 unauthorised" instead. –  Lee Jan 9 '12 at 16:34

You're going on the right way. I'll do just some changes on your code:

$user = array('Mike' => array('Michael', 'fish'));

if(!isset($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_USER']) && !isset($_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_PW']))
{
    header('http/1.1 401 Unauthorized');
    header('www-authenticate: basic');
    exit;
}
else
{
    $input_user = $_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_USER'];
    $input_pw = $_SERVER['PHP_AUTH_PW'];

    if($user[$input_user][1] != $input_pw)
    {
        header('http/1.1 401 Unauthorized');
        header('www-authenticate: basic');
        exit;
    }
}

echo "Hi, " . $user[$input_user][0];

First of all I've changed your users array layout on this layout to this:

Array
(
    [Mike] => Array
        (
            [0] => Michael
            [1] => fish
        )

)

Read for further info Multidimensional Arrays.

Secund, is your username, then it will have another array with name and password of the user. So you'll not have to user foreach to match your username and pass. BTW, the way you done before your script will allow any user to access with another users pass. If you have other user foo and try user = foo and pass = fish it will gain the access.

Third thing is that you don't need to use $userSuccess and $passSuccess no more. Just to decrease code lenght.

Then I associate two vars to the _SERVER vars, to make easy their use. So you can match then with this sentence: $user[$input_user][1] != $input_pw.

I hope this can helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I that you got rid of one of the arrays by making the other multidimensional. I think, though, that I'll need at least $userSuccess when I add another user to the array. –  Jean-Luc Jan 9 '12 at 11:03
    
You can use if you want, but isn't necessary indeed, but if you prefers it's okay. –  user898741 Jan 9 '12 at 11:13

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