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Looked around quite a bit, and can't seem to find a JQuery solution (maybe its just a limitation of JavaScript) for this:

<a href="somelink.php" 
   onclick="return confirm('Go to somelink.php?');">Click Here</a>

In the above example, when a user clicks on the link, it will only go to its href if the user clicks OK in the confirm box.

What I am trying to do is get a more modern look using a popup div. Perhaps something like this:

<a href="somelink.php" 
   onclick="return jq_confirm('Go to somelink.php?');">Click Here</a>

(Where jq_confirm is a custom JQuery confirm function that pops up a nice div with a YES/NO or OK/CANCEL button pair).

However, I cannot seem to find any such thing.

I have looked at some JQuery widget libraries etc which offer similar functionality, but none will wait for the response from the user (at least, not in the scenario described above), but instead they just proceed and take the user to the link (or run any JavaScript embedded in the href='' piece of the link). I suspect this is because while you can attach a callback function to many of these widgets to return a true/false value, the onclick event does not wait for a response (callbacks are asynchronous), thereby defeating the purpose of the confirm box.

What I need is the same kind of halt-all-javascript (modal) functionality that the default confirm() command provides. Is this possible in JQuery (or even in JavaScript)?

As I am not an expert in JavaScript nor in JQuery, I defer to you gurus out there. Any JQuery (or even pure JavaScript) solution is welcome (if possible).

Thanks -

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I have the similer question..! will wait for someone to reply your question..! –  bugBurger May 18 '09 at 17:01

13 Answers 13

I just had to solve the same problem. I wound up using the dialog widget from JQuery UI. I was able to implement this without using callbacks with the caveat that the dialog must be partially initialized in the click event handler for the link you want to use the confirmation functionality with (if you want to use this for more than one link). This is because the target URL for the link must be injected into the event handler for the confirmation button click.

Here's my solution, abstracted away to be suitable for an example. I use a CSS class to indicate which links should have the confirmation behavior.

<div id="dialog" title="Confirmation Required">
  Are you sure about this?
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
  $(document).ready(function() {
    $("#dialog").dialog({
      autoOpen: false,
      modal: true
    });

  $(".confirmLink").click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var targetUrl = $(this).attr("href");

    $("#dialog").dialog({
      buttons : {
        "Confirm" : function() {
          window.location.href = targetUrl;
        },
        "Cancel" : function() {
          $(this).dialog("close");
        }
      }
    });

    $("#dialog").dialog("open");
  });




  }); // end of $(document).ready


</script>

<a class="confirmLink" href="http://someLinkWhichRequiresConfirmation.com">Click here</a>
<a class="confirmLink" href="http://anotherSensitiveLink">Or, you could click here</a>
share|improve this answer
10  
I wonder why this solution got accepted (and 12 upvotes). The answer to OP question is: there is no such thing which stops all javascript processing like confirm. The surprisingly accepted solution would (i'm guessing) probably randomly execute some onclick events if there are any. Probably depending on the browser as well. The whole confirmation dialog replacement seems to have no clean solution. –  Toskan Nov 29 '11 at 18:01
1  
Absolutely agree with Toskan. Also, those users with js disabled will not get directed to anywhere if you simply rely on js based click events. However, I guess this is exactly why you are going for this, no? –  Chris May 24 '12 at 6:30
    
For the record, I DID NOT accept this as the answer. –  OneNerd Aug 3 '12 at 20:09

Check out http://www.84bytes.com/2008/06/02/jquery-modal-dialog-boxes/

They have a good variety of modal-boxes for JQuery.

I think you should see http://www.ericmmartin.com/simplemodal/

A modal dialog override of the JavaScript confirm function. Demonstrates the use of onShow as well as how to display a modal dialog confirmation instead of the default JavaScript confirm dialog.

share|improve this answer
4  
I evaluated that very same code, but it did not work for the scenario I describe. Problem is, I have hundreds of these confirm() codes thru a site coded as I describe, and would rather just do a simple replace -> confirm() with jq_confirm than have to carefully recode all href and onclick code throughout hundreds of pages (if it's possible, that is). –  OneNerd May 18 '09 at 17:53
    
84bytes.com/2008/06/02/jquery-modal-dialog-boxes no longer avaliable –  arjuncc Apr 2 '13 at 12:40

Did you see the jQuery Modal Dialog on jQuery UI site?

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, lotsof dodgy plugins came up on my Googling - this is what I needed! –  Pete Montgomery Sep 11 '11 at 20:27
2  
this does not solve the confirmation problem –  Toskan Nov 25 '11 at 12:12
1  
@Toskan - I read the question as the OP wanting to be able to style and effectively customize the dialog that comes up with confirm(). Since the styling is browser-specific, the OP will need to resort to a client-side script implementation of a dialog box, which is what I am recommending. How does this not solve the confirmation problem? –  Russ Cam Nov 25 '11 at 13:07
3  
Dear RussCam: well it shows a box where you can press some buttons - but that's not what OP was asking for. He was asking for a javascript which stops event execution until confirmed / canceled. The accepted solution (with 12 up-votes) is imho evil. The show stopper is imho that you basically break and drop dead all click events and bam redirect somewhere else. Secondly imagine OP decides to use confirm on submit buttons. Take a big sword and cut down all events in all places for a confirm box? What about a clean solution? –  Toskan Nov 29 '11 at 17:52

I blogged about the solution to this issue here: http://markmintoff.com/2011/03/asp-net-jquery-confirm-dialog/

Even though the article is geared towards ASP.Net it can be easily adapted to php. It relies on preventing the click with a return false and when the user clicks "OK" or "YES" or what-have-you; the link or button is simply clicked again.

var confirmed = false;
function confirmDialog(obj)
{
    if(!confirmed)
    {
        $( "#dialog-confirm" ).dialog({
            resizable: false,
            height:140,
            modal: true,
            buttons: {
                "Yes": function()
                {
                    $( this ).dialog( "close" );
                    confirmed = true; obj.click();
                },
                "No": function()
                {
                    $( this ).dialog( "close" );
                }
            }
        });
    }

    return confirmed;
}

Give it a try and let me know what you think. I hope this solves your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, this is the the only answer I've seen that returns a boolean (as originally asked), paste the code in Mark? –  deadcrab Jun 28 '12 at 9:13
    
brilliant. it saves me some ugly hacks. –  Alexandre Gellibert Jul 20 '12 at 17:08
    
this one is interesting - going to give it a try ... –  OneNerd Aug 3 '12 at 20:13
    
OneNerd : Did this solve your problem? –  Mark Mintoff Aug 22 '12 at 13:37

You should be able to override the standard window.confirm function be writing the following code.

window.confirm = modalConfirm

then you will need to make a function like this

function modalConfirm(message){
  // put your code here and bind "return true/false" to the click event
  // of the "Yes/No" buttons.
}

This should work, although I haven't tested it yet. I am going to do exactly this right now and will let you all know how it worked.

Edit: I have tested my example above now and it was not possible, you will have to pass in a callback function to your overwritten confirm function like this:

function modalConfirm(message, callback){
  ... 
  $("button.yes").click(function(){
     callback(result);
  });
  ...
}

..making your call to the function look like this:

confirm("Are you sure?", function(result){
  alert(result);
});

In other words, it is not possible to completely override the default window.confirm function without causing a nasty loop that causes the browser to hang. I think that you will have to modify your confirm calls like above.

share|improve this answer
    
if it works, let me know - –  OneNerd May 27 '09 at 14:51

My way around this problem was to add some arbitrary data to the object, and check for that data on click. If it existed, proceed with the function as normal, otherwise confirm with a yes/no (in my case using a jqtools overlay). If the user clicks yes - insert the data in the object, simulate another click and wipe the data. If they click no, just close the overlay.

Here is my example:

$('button').click(function(){
    if ($(this).data('confirmed')) {
        // Do stuff
    } else {
        confirm($(this));
    }
});

And this is what I did to override the confirm function (using a jquery tools overlay):

window.confirm = function(obj){
    $('#dialog').html('\
        <div>\
            <h2>Confirm</h2>\
            <p>Are you sure?</p>\
            <p>\
                <button name="confirm" value="yes" class="facebox-btn close">Yes</button>\
                <button name="confirm" value="no" class="facebox-btn close">No</button>\
            </p>\
        </div>').overlay().load();
    $('button[name=confirm]').click(function(){
        if ($(this).val() == 'yes') {
            $('#dialog').overlay().close();
            obj.data('confirmed', true).click().removeData('confirmed');
        } else {
            $('#dialog').overlay().close();
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer

I have a solution that can be used to replace the default window.confirm function. It doesn't require you overriding window.confirm as that is not fully possible.

My solution allows you to have a general class like me, let's say 'confirm-action' that you place on any element that requires a confirmation before being processed. The script is very simple and utilizes jQuery, jQuery UI Dialog and no other plugins.

You can find the complete demo of the implementation on jsFiddle, http://jsfiddle.net/74NDD/39/.

Usage:

  • Add this javascript code in your html head or before any other click binding you have in your javascript.

    $("#dialog:ui-dialog").dialog("destroy");
    
    $('.confirm-action').live('click', function(e) {
        $self = $(this);
    
        if (e && e.stopImmediatePropagation && $self.data('confirmed') !== true) {
            e.stopImmediatePropagation();
    
            $('#confirm-action-dialog').dialog({
                height: 110,
                modal: true,
                resizable: false,
                draggable: false,
                buttons: {
                    'Yes': function() {
                        $(this).dialog('close');
                        $self.data('confirmed', true);
                        $self.click();
                    },
                    'No': function() {
                        $self.data('confirmed', false);
                        $(this).dialog('close');
                    }
                }
            });
        } else if ($self.data('confirmed') === true) {
            e = window.event;
            e.cancelBubble = false;
            $self.data('confirmed', false);
        }
    
        return false;
    });
    
  • Place this html somewhere in the body (it is hidden by default).

    <div style="display:none;" id="confirm-action-dialog" title="Confirm Action?">
        <p>
            <span class="ui-icon ui-icon-alert"></span>
            Are you sure you want to continue?
        </p>
    </div>
    
  • Put the class 'confirm-action' on any element that requires confirmation.

    confirm-action

This solution works perfect as it does not alter jQuery event bubbling, it merely pauses (stops) all other events until the user decides what they want to do.

I hope this is helpful for someone else as I was unable to find any other solution that doesn't require me installing another jQuery plugin or do some other hack.

share|improve this answer

Building on top of Banu's solution (thanks a ton!) to make it a one pop solution on top of each page. Paste this code inside:

$(document).ready

And add "confirmLinkFollow" class to all links you want confirmed:

$(".confirmLinkFollow").click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    var targetUrl = $(this).attr("href");
var $dialog_link_follow_confirm = $('<div></div>').
        html("<p>Are you sure?</p>").
        dialog({autoOpen: false,
        title: 'Please Confirm',
        buttons : {
            "Confirm" : function() { 
                window.location.href = targetUrl; 
        },
        "Cancel" : function() { 
                $(this).dialog("close"); 
            }
        },

        modal: true,
    minWidth: 250,
    minHeight: 120
    }
    );


    $dialog_link_follow_confirm.dialog("open");
});
share|improve this answer

Since this question seems to be missing the canonical answer: there is no way to programatically pause (and resume) javascript execution like alert or confirm do.

That being said, relying on this behaviour today is usually considered bad practice given the single threaded nature of javascript, and the reason why the aforementioned functions do pause execution is probably because they were designed when the web was still at a very early stage, and later left unchanged to ensure compatibility. Since the focus nowadays is in writing as much non-blocking js code as possible, it's unlikely the functionality to programmatically halt js will ever make it to any future specification of ECMAScript, so your best bet is to rework your site to make sure confirm and alert dialogs can co-exist with other javascript code running in the background.

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Put the redirect inside the function like:

<script>
    function confirmRedirect(url, desciption) {
       if (confirmWindow(desciption)) {
           window.location = url;
       }
    }
</script>

And call it like this:

<a href="javascript:confirmRedirect('somlink.php','Are you sure?')">Go!</a> 
share|improve this answer
1  
I would suggest not using the javascript:function() inline code, as it does not degrade well when javascript is disabled. The link will do nothing if that is the case. Instead use <a href="somelocation" onclick="myFunc();return false">click here</a> or <a href="#" onclick="myFunc();return false">click here</a> as done in the original question. –  ryanulit May 18 '09 at 17:18
    
Problem is, I have hundreds of these confirm() codes thru a site coded as I describe, and would rather just do a simple replace -> confirm() with jq_confirm than have to carefully recode all href and onclick code throughout hundreds of pages (if it's possible, that is). –  OneNerd May 18 '09 at 17:54
7  
Users w/out javascript = who cares –  Adam May 18 '09 at 18:41

Almost three years later, I am looking for something similar. Since I have not found an acceptable "quick" solution, I wrote something that comes very close to the criteria of the OP. I figure others may find it useful in the future.

JavaScript is event-driven and that means it does not support any sort of "wait" or "sleep" loop that we can use to pause a pure-javascript confirm function. The options involve burning processor cycles, using a browser plugin, or AJAX. In our increasingly mobile world, and with sometimes spotty internet connections, none of these are great solutions. This means that we have to return from our "confirm" function immediately.

However, since there is no "false" logic in the code snippet above (ie. nothing is done when the user clicks "Cancel"), we can trigger the "click" or "submit" event again when the user clicks "OK." Why not set a flag and react based on that flag within our "confirm" function?

For my solution, I opted to use FastConfirm rather than a "modal" dialog. You can easily modify the code to use anything you want but my example was designed to use this:

https://github.com/pjparra/Fast-Confirm

Due to the nature of what this does, I do not see a clean way to package it up. If you feel that this has too many rough edges, feel free to smooth them out or rewrite your code the way that everyone else has recommended:

/* This version of $.fn.hasEvent is slightly modified to provide support for
 * the "onclick" or "onsubmit" tag attributes. I chose this because it was
 * short, even if it is cryptic.
 *
 * Learn more about the code by Sven Eisenschmidt, which is licensed under
 * the MIT and GPL at:
 *     http://github.com/fate/jquery-has-event
 */
(function($) {
    $.fn.hasEvent = function(A, F, E) {
        var L = 0;
        var T = typeof A;
        E = E ? E : this;
        var V = (E.attr('on'+A) != undefined);
        A = (T == 'string') ? $.trim(A) : A;
        if (T == 'function')
            F = A, A = null;
        if (F == E)
            delete(F);
        var S = E.data('events');
        for (e in S)
            if (S.hasOwnProperty(e))
                L++;
        if (L < 1)
            return V; // = false;
        if (A && !F) {
            return V = S.hasOwnProperty(A);
        } else if(A && S.hasOwnProperty(A) && F) {
            $.each(S[A], function(i, r) {
                if(V == false && r.handler == F) V = true;
            });
            return V;
        } else if(!A && F) {
            $.each(S, function(i, s) {
                if (V == false) {
                    $.each(s, function(k, r) {
                        if (V == false && r.handler == F)
                            V = true;
                    });
                }
            });
        }
        return V;
    }
    $.extend($, {hasEvent: $.fn.hasEvent});
}) (jQuery);

/* Nearly a drop-in replacement for JavaScript's confirm() dialog.
 * Syntax:
 *   onclick="return jq_confirm(this, 'Are you sure that you want this?', 'right');"
 *
 * NOTE: Do not implement "false" logic when using this function. Find another way.
 */
var jq_confirm_bypass = false;
function jq_confirm(el, question, pos) {
    var override = false;
    var elem = $(el);

    if ($.fn.fastConfirm == undefined) {
        override = confirm(question);
    } else if (!jq_confirm_bypass) {
        if (pos == undefined) {
            pos = 'right';
        }

        elem.fastConfirm({
            position: pos,
            questionText: question,
            onProceed: function(trigger) {
                var elem = $(trigger);
                elem.fastConfirm('close');

                if (elem.hasEvent('click')) {
                    jq_confirm_bypass = true;
                    elem.click();
                    jq_confirm_bypass = false;
                }
                if (elem.hasEvent('submit')) {
                    jq_confirm_bypass = true;
                    elem.submit();
                    jq_confirm_bypass = false;
                }
                // TODO: ???
            },
            onCancel: function(trigger) {
                $(trigger).fastConfirm('close');
            }
        });
    }

    return override ? override : jq_confirm_bypass;
}

So... onclick="return confirm('Do you want to test this?');" would become onclick="return jq_confirm(this, 'Do you want to test this?');" The pos/"right" parameter is optional and is specifically for Fast-Confirm.

When you click, the jq_confirm() function will spawn the jQuery dialog and return "false." When the user clicks "OK" then jq_confirm() sets a flag, calls the original click (or submit) event, returns "true", then unsets the flag in case you want to remain on the same page.

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The following link has a jQuery plugin for confirm boxes similar to constructing like confirm("something") in JavaScript

http://labs.abeautifulsite.net/archived/jquery-alerts/demo/

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If you need Overriding the window.alert() dialog box you can find it here

after that I have create my own Overriding the window.confirm() dialog box you can find it here

Overriding the window.confirm() dialog box.

It is pretty simple just like:

window.confirm = function(message, title, doYes) {
        $(document.createElement('div'))
                .attr({title: title, class: 'confirm'})
                .html(message)
                .dialog({
            buttons: {
                "Confirm": function() {
                    $(this).dialog("close");
                    if (doYes && (typeof doYes === "function")) {
                        doYes();
                    } 
                },
                "Cancel": function() {
                    $(this).dialog("close");
                }
            }
            ,
            close: function() {
                $(this).remove();
            },
            draggable: true,
            modal: true,
            resizable: false,
            width: 'auto'
        });
    };

// New confirm
//confirm('This is a <strong>new</strong> alert!','Confirm', function(){alert('Yes')},function(){alert('No')});
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