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I have a MySQL table with two fields as primary key (ID & Account), ID has AUTO_INCREMENT. This results in the following MySQL table:

 ID    |  Account
------------------
 1     |     1
 2     |     1
 3     |     2
 4     |     3

However, I expected the following result (restart AUTO_INCREMENT for each Account):

 ID    |  Account
------------------
 1     |     1
 2     |     1
 1     |     2
 1     |     3

What is wrong in my configuration? How can I fix this?

Thanks!

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2  
What is the create table statement and what engine are you using? –  Mark Jan 9 '12 at 11:17

2 Answers 2

Functionality you're describing is possible only with MyISAM engine. You need to specify the CREATE TABLE statement like this:

CREATE TABLE your_table ( id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, account_id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, PRIMARY KEY(account_id, id) ) ENGINE = MyISAM;

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If you use an innoDB engine, you can use a trigger like this:

CREATE TRIGGER `your_table_before_ins_trig` BEFORE INSERT ON `your_table`
FOR EACH ROW 
begin
declare next_id int unsigned default 1;

  -- get the next ID for your Account Number
  select max(ID) + 1 into next_id from your_table where Account = new.Account;

  -- if there is no Account number yet, set the ID to 1 by default
  IF next_id IS NULL THEN SET next_id = 1; END IF;

  set new.ID= next_id; 
end#

Note ! your delimiter column is # in the sql statement above !

This solution works for a table like yours if you create it without any auto_increment functionality like this:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `your_table` (
  `ID` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `Account` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`ID`,`Account`)
);

Now you can insert your values like this:

INSERT INTO your_table (`Account`) VALUES (1);
INSERT INTO your_table (`Account`, `ID`) VALUES (1, 5);
INSERT INTO your_table (`Account`) VALUES (2);
INSERT INTO your_table (`Account`, `ID`) VALUES (3, 10205);

It will result in this:

 ID    |  Account
------------------
 1     |     1
 2     |     1
 1     |     2
 1     |     3
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