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Why 4.1%2 returns 0.0999999999999996?But 4.2%2==0.2.

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for me 4.2 % 2 == 0.20000000000000018 (ruby 1.9.2) –  32bitkid Jan 9 '12 at 14:03
    
You can find easier analysis here: stackoverflow.com/questions/9136860/… –  Gangnus Mar 5 '12 at 20:45

5 Answers 5

Because you're working in floating-point. Binary floating-point cannot represent 0.1 exactly.

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See here: What Every Programmer Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

Real numbers are infinite. Computers are working with a finite number of bits (32 bits, 64 bits today). As a result floating-point arithmetic done by computers cannot represent all the real numbers. 0.1 is one of these numbers.

Note that is not an issue related to Ruby, but to all programming languages because it comes from the way computers represent real numbers.

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This paper frequently gets cited in answers to questions like this, but it's really not aimed at beginners. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 9 '12 at 12:51
    
I agree but I don't know an other easier document on the subject. Do you ? –  Manuel Selva Jan 9 '12 at 12:52
    
See my answer elsewhere on this question. –  Ned Batchelder Jan 9 '12 at 14:36
    
Factually,it is really hard for me(a beginner) to understand the paper.But at least I already know why it happens.Thank you for your help. –  Alex Jan 10 '12 at 4:00
    
I agree but don't worry I think the first pages are enough to clearly answer your question. –  Manuel Selva Jan 10 '12 at 7:39

Floats can not always be represented exactly, see

What Every Programmer Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic

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This paper frequently gets cited in answers to questions like this, but it's really not aimed at beginners. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 9 '12 at 12:50
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Yes, but I'd rather leave it to OP to decide if the paper is good for him or not instead of deciding that for him. –  Michael Kohl Jan 9 '12 at 12:59

Here's a different page about floating-point: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/floatingpoint.html. It's from the Python docs, but it's true of all languages that use fixed-size binary floats.

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In double-precision, 4.1 = 4.0999999999999996447286321199499070644378662109375 and 4.2 = 4.20000000000000017763568394002504646778106689453125. In other words, the binary approximation to decimal 4.1 is slightly less than you'd expect, and the binary approximation to decimal 4.2 is slightly more.

Now why did 0.20000000000000017... round to 0.2 but 0.099999999999999644... NOT round to 0.1? Ruby is probably rounding all output to 15 significant decimal digits.

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Although @32bitkid's Ruby (from comment above) seems to round to 17 digits. What version of Ruby are you using? –  Rick Regan Jan 9 '12 at 14:28

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