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For example, I have this string "This is a trial string", and I know that I want the word which is at position 2 (in this case, the word "This"). The letter at index 2 of the whole string is part of the word "This", so I want to get that word. In case I supply the index of a separator, then I wouldn´t get any specific word, just the separator.

How can do this? I found this link, but it shows how to get everything AFTER a certain index, I need the word AT a certain index.

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What would 4 return? –  Ray Jan 9 '12 at 13:23
    
"This" is not at position 2. What do you mean? –  Tigran Jan 9 '12 at 13:24
    
Maybe you can search for whitespace before and after? (an IndexOf variant) –  jv42 Jan 9 '12 at 13:24
3  
I think he means that the letter at index 2 of the whole string is part of the word "This". I could be wrong, though - it is a little bit vague - what happens if you supply the index of a separator (space)? Which word do you use? –  ZombieSheep Jan 9 '12 at 13:24
    
Or you can iterate yourself until you pick whitespace. –  jv42 Jan 9 '12 at 13:25

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could make an extension method that checks for spaces:

Call like this: string theWord = myString.GetWordAtPosition(18);

    static class WordFinder
    {
        public static string GetWordAtPosition(this string text, int position)
        {
            if (text.Length - 1 < position || text[position] == ' ') return null;

            int start = position;
            int end = position;
            while (text[start] != ' ' && start > 0) start--;
            while (text[end] != ' ' && end < text.Length - 1) end++;

            return text.Substring(start == 0 ? 0 : start + 1, end - start - 1);

        }
    }
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1  
Worked! Also a small detail, return text.Substring(start == 0 ? 0 : start + 1, end - start-1); so as not to return the last whitespace! –  Soph Jan 9 '12 at 13:50
1  
And add the test if (end > start) before returnung the result. The position might be pointing at a space! –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 9 '12 at 13:55
    
Updated answer, my bad :) –  Bas Jan 9 '12 at 14:00

You could store the starting indexes of words in array (or hashtable) such as:

0 : The
6 : is
9: a
11: trial
17: string

And then compare it with the index you need.

Upd. Example added of finding indexes:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var str = "This is a trial string";
    var words = str.Split(new [] { " " }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries);
    var list = new List<Tuple<int, string>>();
    foreach (var word in words)
    {
        list.Add(new Tuple<int, string>(str.IndexOf(word), word));
    }
}

Variable list will contain all indexes.

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1  
Well of course, but how do you get the starting indexes? –  Ray Jan 9 '12 at 13:33
    
@Ray. You may use different approaches: split into words and find their indexes with IndexOf or use recursively IndexOf(). –  sashaeve Jan 9 '12 at 13:39
    
have a look at my solution without using an additional list to keep the indexes –  Massimiliano Peluso Jan 9 '12 at 13:56

Use RegEx and Linq to get the words, and find the word (i.e. Match) where the start index and length bound the position of your character:

static string GetWord(String input, int charIndex) {
    if (charIndex > (input.Length - 1)) { throw new IndexOutOfRangeException(); }
    if (!Regex.IsMatch(input[charIndex].ToString(), @"\w")) {
        throw new ArgumentException(
            String.Format("The character at position {0} is not in a word", charIndex));
    }
    return (
        from Match mx in Regex.Matches(input, @"\w+")
        where (mx.Index <= charIndex) && ((mx.Index + mx.Length - 1) >= charIndex)
        select mx).Single().Value;
}
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Worked as well! –  Soph Jan 9 '12 at 13:59
string sString = "This is a trial string";
int iPos = 3;
int iBegin = -1, iEnd = 0;

if (sString[iPos] == ' ') // Character is space, no word?
    return;

for (int i = iPos; i >= 0; i--)
    if (sString[i] == ' ')
    {
       iBegin = i+1;
       break;
    }

if (iBegin == -1) // in case of first word
    iBegin = 0;

for (int i = iPos; i < sString.Length; i++)
    if (sString[i] == ' ') 
    {
        iEnd = i-1;
        break;
    }

string sWord = sString.Substring(iBegin, iEnd-iBegin+1);
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how about (untested and unoptimised)...

string GetWordAtIndex(string original, int position)
{
    int startPoint = original.Substring(0,position).LastIndexOf(" ");
    if(startPoint < 0) startPoint = 0;
    int endPoint = original.Substring(position).IndexOf(" ") + position;
    return original.Substring(startPoint, endPoint-startPoint);
}

doesn't check for the word being the last in the original string, either, which may throw an out of bounds error. Just need to check if endPoint == -1 and adjust accordingly

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Worked! Only detail: at the end return original.Substring(startPoint-1, endPoint-startPoint);, in order to return the string without the whitespace. Thanks! –  Soph Jan 9 '12 at 13:46

To find the word at the character position you could do this:

        string input = "This is a trial string";
        int position = 2;

        var words = input.Split(' ');

        int characterCount = 0;
        for (int wordIndex = 0; wordIndex < words.Length; wordIndex++)
        {
            var word = words[wordIndex];
            if (characterCount + word.Length + wordIndex > position)
                return word;
            characterCount += word.Length;
        }

        return null;

This returns the word after the space if the index corresponds to a space.

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Also worked! Thanks –  Soph Jan 9 '12 at 13:57

Here's a simple version:

var firstPos = str.LastIndexOf(' ', index) + 1;
var lastPos = str.IndexOf(' ', index);
var word = lastPos == -1 ? str.Substring(firstPos)
                         : str.Substring(firstPos, lastPos - firstPos);
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Something like this should work for you.

    string GetWordFromIndex(string value, int index)
    {

        int scannedIndex = 0;
        return  value.Split().First<string>(str =>
        {

            scannedIndex += str.Length;
            if (index < scannedIndex)
            {
                return true;
            }

            return false;

        });

    }

use like

var result = GetWordFromIndex( "This is a trial string", 2);
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string WordAtIndex( string myString, int chosenIndex)
{
     char[] cArray = myString.ToCharArray();

     int currentWordCount = 0;

     //return an empty string if the index is whitespace.
     if (cArray[chosenIndex] == ' ')
         return string.Empty;

     for (int i = 0; i < chosenIndex; i++)
     {
         if (cArray[i] == ' ')
             currentWordCount++;
     }

     return myString.Split(' ')[currentWordCount];
}

To use:

string word = WordAtIndex("This is a trial string", 2);
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I think this is one of the fastest solution

public static string GetWord(string str,int index) {
            var vettWord = str.Split(' ');
            int position=0;
            foreach(var item in vettWord){
                if ( index<= position+item.Length)
                {
                    return item;
                }
               position += item.Length+1; // +1 to consider the white space
            }
            return string.Empty;
        }

I have tried it

  static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            string s = "This is a trial string";
            Console.WriteLine(GetWord(s, 17)); //string
            Console.WriteLine(GetWord(s, 2)); // This
            Console.WriteLine(GetWord(s, 9)); // a
        }
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