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I have a generic dictionary of objects where the key is of type Type:

public class DynamicObject : IDictionary<Type, object>

The idea is that this object is shared in a plugin-based architecture and so a type (which could reside in a plugin .dll) is used as a key in order to prevent clashes between plugins. This type is also used to store metadata about the field (such as a description of that field or the actual type of that field).

Currently plugins need to set the value of fields on this object using code similar to this:

DynamicObject someObject;
string someValue;
someObject[typeof(UsernameField)] = someValue;

The only problem with this is that this isn't type safe - even though the type UsernameField is aware of the exact type of the value it is expecting (e.g. int or in this case string), the value supplied here is just typed as an object. I'd like to use generics to make setting / getting of properties type safe but I'm not sure how. So far the best I've come up with is this:

// Field is a base class for all types used as keys on DynamicObject
[Description("Username of the user")]
public class UsernameField : Field
{
    public static void Set(DynamicObject obj, string value)
    {
        obj[typeof(UsernameField)] = someValue;
    }
}

// To set fields
UsernameField.Set(obj, someValue);

This is type safe, however it means that each of my field types (e.g. UsernameField) has a nearly identical static Set method.

How can I have type-safe access to values in this way without having lots of nearly identical methods on each of my field types?

As an aside, is using Type as a key like this a good idea or are there hidden pitfalls that I'm not yet aware of?

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what is the relation between the Type and the object here? is the object always of type Type? –  Marc Gravell Jan 9 '12 at 13:56
    
Can you give more meaningful names to MyObject and MyField so we can understand their meaning? –  Ilya Kogan Jan 9 '12 at 13:58
    
@MarcGravell At the moment the values aren't actually of the same type as the key, so in the above someValue is actually a string not a MyField. Having said that I could change it so that this is the case (having seen your now-deleted answer) –  Justin Jan 9 '12 at 14:01
    
@Justin yeah, I wrote an answer, but then realised I wasn't 100% sure of the context scenario - hence the question. –  Marc Gravell Jan 9 '12 at 14:03
    
@IlyaKogan I've made an attempt at making the names more meaningful while also not getting too bogged down in the domain specific question - is this better? –  Justin Jan 9 '12 at 14:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Define an interface that all your plugins must implement:

public interface IPlugin {
    string Name { get; }
    string Author { get; }
    string Description { get; }
    void Init();
}

And then use a Dictionary<Type, IPlugIn>.

Typically the interface is declared in a separate dll (like "MyCompany.MyProject.PlugIns.Contracts.dll").


EDIT: Ok, I think that I know what you mean now.

The trick is to have a generic class between Field and UsernameField with a generic Set method. The fact that Field is not generic, makes all the field types assignable to it. This would not be the case, if it was declared as Field<T>.

public abstract class Field
{
}

public abstract class GenericField<T> : Field
{
    public void Set(DynamicObject obj, T value)
    {
        obj[this.GetType()] = value;
    }
}

public class UsernameField : GenericField<string>
{
    #region Singleton Pattern

    public static readonly UsernameField Instance = new UsernameField();

    private UsernameField() { }

    #endregion

}

Because we need to call GetType in the Set method, we cannot declare it as static. Therefore, I used the singleton pattern.

Now, we can set the field in a type safe way:

UsernameField.Instance.Set(obj, "Joe");

ADDITION 1:

Since now the fields are singletons, you could use the fields as key of the dictionary instead of their type.

public class DynamicObject : IDictionary<Field, object> { }

And Set would become:

public void Set(DynamicObject obj, T value)
{
    obj[this] = value;
}

ADDITION 2:

You could also define DynamicObject like this:

public class DynamicObject : Dictionary<Field, object>
{
    public void Set<T>(GenericField<T> field, T value)
    {
        this[field] = value;
    }
}

Now you can set values like this:

obj.Set(UsernameField.Instance, "Sue");

This is type safe and seems more natural. The Set method in GenericField is obsolete now.

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This is a possibility (although fields could be shared between plugins and so I'd use interface IField and Dictionary<Type, IField> instead), however doesn't seem that "neat"... –  Justin Jan 9 '12 at 14:07
    
As an alternative to using GetType in this situation you could use MethodInfo.GetCurrentMethod().ReflectedType if the preference is to make Set static. –  M.Babcock Jan 9 '12 at 15:13
    
This would return DynamicFields.GenericField`1[T], but not the derived class. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 9 '12 at 15:21

Fields shouldn't have to know about a DynamicObject to get and set the value. You could make DyanmicObject handle the getting and setting of values, but I think a better approach is to treat the DynamicObject as a collection of Field instances, and each field has its own value. Something like this:

interface IField
{
    object Value { get; set; }
}

interface IField<T> : IField
{
    new T Value { get; set; }
}

abstract class BaseField<T> : IField<T>
{
    T _value;
    public T Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set
        {
            // could add stuff like OnValueChanging, IsValueValid, etc...
            this._value = value;
        }
    }

    object IField.Value
    {
        get { return Value; }
        set { Value = (T)value; }
    }
}

class DynamicObject : List<IField>
{
    public TField GetField<TField>() where TField : IField
    {
        return this.OfType<TField>().Single();
    }
}

And the usage would then be:

class UsernameField : BaseField<string> { }

[TestMethod]
public void test()
{
    var parent = new DynamicObject();
    var field = new UsernameField() { Value = "the username" };
    parent.Add(field);
    Assert.AreEqual("the username", parent.GetField<UsernameField>().Value);
}
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I may just be missing the point of the question but if the goal is to reduce the amount of code duplication required to achieve type safety, then why not define accessor helpers based on the type of field rather than the field itself:

public abstract class StringField<T> : Field
{
    public static void Set(DynamicObject obj, string value)
    {
        obj[typeof(T)] = someValue;
    }
}

public class UsernameField : StringField<UsernameField> { }

// To set fields
UsernameField.Set(obj, someValue);

Edit:

Or you could use a slight variation of Oliver's solution without the Singleton:

public abstract class GenericField<T, U> : Field
{
    public static void Set(DynamicObject obj, T value)
    {
        obj[typeof(U)] = value;
    }
}

public class UsernameField : GenericField<string, UsernameField> { }
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