Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any way to detect both Readline and ReadKey, so that in most cases it behaves as a readline, except for some special key inputs that should be detected?

I need some "parallel" implementation to introduce simultaneity. The code below is synchronous and does not meet my need

while ((line = Console.ReadLine()) != "x")
{    
    if (line == "BLABLA")
    {
        //Stuff
    }

    else
    {
        //Stuff
    }

    ConsoleKeyInfo ki = Console.ReadKey(true);
    if ((ki.Key == ConsoleKey.V) && (ki.Modifiers == ConsoleModifiers.Control))
    {
        //Stuff
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate stackoverflow.com/questions/5891538/… –  Alex Jan 9 '12 at 14:45

2 Answers 2

No, not as such. Both methods block until the user enters something on the console. So even if you would find a way to have both run in parallel, it will not be deterministic which one gets the first shot.

There is a (not obvious) similar problem: how to make Console.ReadLine() abort/break after a certain amount of time without user input.

There have been multiple attempts for this problem here:

Most are modelled around either creating your own version of a ReadLine function that adds a timeout (or in your case special handling for certain character (codes)) or the use some sort of threading.

Both ways are either non-trivial or have their own issues (make sure you review the comments, even for the accepted answers).

In short, I think you will need to roll your own version of ReadLine, based on Console.ReadKey with your special handling included and that much of the genuine Console.ReadLine behavior that you require. Note that this even include such basic things as RETURN, ARROW KEYS, BACKSPACE handling, etc.

Update: There is the getline.cs Code from the Mono project, which implements a line editing capability like it was provided by some venerable UNIX shells (EMACS mode, if you care). For that, I believe it will need to implement some sort of ReadLine replacement, although I haven't checked. Maybe you can use this as a starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
Definitely not worth it to implement a whole comprehensive readline logic. Too much a hassle for such a "small" feature. Can't believe it's not possible more simply, as it's a feature one would really expect from a shell. Besides, I really did not get the point : What does aborting readline after a certain amount of time has to do with my post ? –  Mehdi LAMRANI Jan 9 '12 at 14:39
    
@MikaJacobi It also requires you to tailor ReadLine in a way it wasn't initially ment for. In particular, at least some implementations also require a rewrite, which you could extend with your functionality. –  Christian.K Jan 9 '12 at 14:40

Here's a function I just made to do this.

Right now it only handles backspace, enter, and Esc, but it could easily be modified to handle other keys if you deem them necessary.

    // returns null if user pressed Escape, or the contents of the line if they pressed Enter.
    private static string ReadLineOrEsc()
    {
        string retString = "";

        int curIndex = 0;
        do
        {
            ConsoleKeyInfo readKeyResult = Console.ReadKey(true);

            // handle Esc
            if (readKeyResult.Key == ConsoleKey.Escape)
            {
                Console.WriteLine();
                return null;
            }

            // handle Enter
            if (readKeyResult.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
            {
                Console.WriteLine();
                return retString;
            }

            // handle backspace
            if (readKeyResult.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace)
            {
                if (curIndex > 0)
                {
                    retString = retString.Remove(retString.Length - 1);
                    Console.Write(readKeyResult.KeyChar);
                    Console.Write(' ');
                    Console.Write(readKeyResult.KeyChar);
                    curIndex--;
                }
            }
            else
            // handle all other keypresses
            {
                retString += readKeyResult.KeyChar;
                Console.Write(readKeyResult.KeyChar);
                curIndex++;
            }
        }
        while (true);
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.