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I need to loop some values,

for i in $(seq $first $last)
do
    does something here
done

For $first and $last, i need it to be of fixed length 5. So if the input is 1, i need to add zeros in front such that it becomes 00001. It loops till 99999 for example, but the length has to be 5.

E.g.: 00002, 00042, 00212, 012312 and so forth.

Any idea on how i can do that?

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2  
A good answer could be: seq - w 1 99999. Option -w keeps output lenght constant, padding shortest numbers with 0. –  Bruno von Paris Jan 27 at 13:04

5 Answers 5

up vote 93 down vote accepted

In your specific case though it's probably easiest to use the -f flag to seq to get it to format the numbers as it outputs the list. For example:

for i in $(seq -f "%05g" 10 15)
do
  echo $i
done

will produce the following output:

00010
00011
00012
00013
00014
00015

More generally, bash has printf as a built-in so you can pad output with zeroes as follows:

$ i=99
$ printf "%05d\n" $i
00099

You can use the -v flag to store the output in another variable:

$ i=99
$ printf -v j "%05d" $i
$ echo $j
00099

Notice that printf supports a slightly different format to seq so you need to use %05d instead of %05g.

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thank you it solved my problem! –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 14:56
    
%05g instead of %05d fixed it for me. "00026" was giving me "00022". Thanks! –  Ed Manet Feb 21 '13 at 21:16
3  
Great, comprehensive answer. One small correction: strictly speaking, seq supports a subset of the format chars. that printf supports (and that subsets includes g, but not d). The behavior of characters d and g differs subtly in that d interprets 0-prefixed numbers strings as octal numbers and converts them to decimal, whereas g treats them as decimals. (@EdManet: that's why '00026' turned into '00022' with d). Another thing worth mentioning: seq -w does automatic zero-padding of the output numbers based on the widest number generated. –  mklement0 Jul 31 '13 at 17:30
    
This helped me generate hex characters list. for (( i = 0; i <= 0xffffffff; i++ )) do printf "%08x\n" $i ; done >> hex.txt produced a 8 character hexadecimal list. Thanks. –  cde Jan 25 at 22:32
    
You are a genius and a beautiful human being! –  Fuser97381 Jul 15 at 19:02

Easier still you can just do

for i in {00001..99999}; do
  echo $i
done
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3  
This works on Bash version 4.1.2 (CentOS 6) but fails in version 3.2.25 (CentOS 5). I do agree that this is much more aesthetically pleasing way to do it! –  Mike Starov Sep 13 '13 at 16:03

use printf with "%05d" e.g.

printf "%05d" 1
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Very simple using printf

[jaypal:~/Temp] printf "%05d\n" 1
00001
[jaypal:~/Temp] printf "%05d\n" 2
00002
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thanks very helpful! –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 14:56

Use awk like this:

awk -v start=1 -v end=10 'BEGIN{for (i=start; i<=end; i++) printf("%05d\n", i)}'

OUTPUT:

00001
00002
00003
00004
00005
00006
00007
00008
00009
00010

Update:

As pure bash alternative you can do this to get same output:

for i in {1..10}
do
   printf "%05d\n" $i
done

This way you can avoid using an external program seq which is NOT available on all the flavors of *nix.

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1  
We can use awk's BEGIN statement so that we don't have to use the heredoc assignment. –  jaypal Jan 9 '12 at 14:36
    
@JaypalSingh: Thanks mate, that's a good point. Updated my answer. –  anubhava Jan 9 '12 at 14:41

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