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A span is an inline element and div is a block element. Is there a 'native' (X)HTML / HTML5 inline-block element that can act like a container? (Without applying CSS)

Definitions:

block
This value causes an element to generate a block box.
inline-block
This value causes an element to generate an inline-level block container. The inside of an inline-block is formatted as a block box, and the element itself is formatted as an atomic inline-level box.
inline
This value causes an element to generate one or more inline boxes.

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@Oded: w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#display-prop –  Crozin Jan 9 '12 at 14:26
    
An image is inline-block, it will not break in a line. –  Kees C. Bakker Jan 9 '12 at 14:26
    
Image is an inline element –  Erik Dekker Jan 9 '12 at 14:26
    
@ErikDekker Link? –  Kees C. Bakker Jan 9 '12 at 14:30
    
Hm, guess you are right: stackoverflow.com/questions/2402761/…. Quote: In CSS, you can set an element to display: inline-block to make it replicate the behaviour of images --> So you there's your answer as well. You need to specify it. –  Erik Dekker Jan 9 '12 at 14:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, there is not. You have to specify inline-block explictly.

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Strictly speaking <button> fulfils the criteria set. HTML5 says

When the button binding applies to a button element [which it ordinarily does], the element is expected to render as an 'inline-block' box rendered as a button whose contents are the contents of the element.

However while it is a container element that has a default inline-block rendering, it is not a General Purpose container so can't be used for anything but as a button.

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iframe is also inline-block too

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Link to any documentation about this? –  Kees C. Bakker Aug 21 '12 at 7:29
1  
Nope, it's an inline replaced element. Tends to work about the same as inline-block, but technically, it isn't. –  Brilliand Apr 19 '13 at 19:53

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