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Are PHP variables passed by value or by reference?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 102 down vote accepted

It's by value according to the PHP Documentation.

By default, function arguments are passed by value (so that if the value of the argument within the function is changed, it does not get changed outside of the function). To allow a function to modify its arguments, they must be passed by reference.

To have an argument to a function always passed by reference, prepend an ampersand (&) to the argument name in the function definition.

<?php
function add_some_extra(&$string)
{
$string .= 'and something extra.';
}
$str = 'This is a string, ';
add_some_extra($str);
echo $str; // outputs 'This is a string, and something extra.'
?>
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2  
I also had this doubt ( newbie ) - so just to be clear , this would be the same as $str = add_some_extra($str); if I was not using the reference , right ? then what is the real added value of that ? –  Obmerk Kronen Nov 24 '13 at 6:06

It seems a lot of people get confused by the way objects are passed to functions and what pass by reference means. Object variables are still passed by value, its just the value that is passed in PHP5 is a reference handle. As proof:

<?php
class Holder {
    private $value;

    public function __construct($value) {
        $this->value = $value;
    }

    public function getValue() {
        return $this->value;
    }
}

function swap($x, $y) {
    $tmp = $x;
    $x = $y;
    $y = $tmp;
}

$a = new Holder('a');
$b = new Holder('b');
swap($a, $b);

echo $a->getValue() . ", " . $b->getValue() . "\n";

Outputs:

a, b

To pass by reference means we can modify the variables that are seen by the caller. Which clearly the code above does not do. We need to change the swap function to:

<?php
function swap(&$x, &$y) {
    $tmp = $x;
    $x = $y;
    $y = $tmp;
}

$a = new Holder('a');
$b = new Holder('b');
swap($a, $b);

echo $a->getValue() . ", " . $b->getValue() . "\n";

Outputs:

b, a

in order to pass by reference.

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5  
I think this proof is a misinterpretation. It looks like you were trying to swap references. You have a problem with how objects are assigned. You are reassigning the reference which is immutable. It's the value it points to that can be changed from inside. The redefinition of swap is now passing **x, which allows you to change *x. The problem is in thinking that $x = $y would change what $x originally points to. –  grantwparks Jun 17 '12 at 20:26

@Karl

In PHP5 variables are by default passed by value and objects are by default passed by reference.

Either can be optionally passed by reference using the & operator.

However, most older PHP functions will not alter a primitive even if you pass a reference...

$str = "hello world";

echo $str; // hello world
echo strrev($str); // dlrow olleh

strrev( &$str ); // ! Warning is issued
echo $str; // hello world

$str = strrev($str);
echo $str; // dlrow olleh

If you do try to pass a value as a reference it will throw a warning. It is up to the function to decide to work on the value or reference.

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6  
Objects are not passed by reference per default. Objects aren't passed at all, object references are passed. By value. No, that's not the same thing. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 21 '10 at 10:40
3  
In C++, objects are passed by value per default (if you don't explicitly use pointers). My point is that the statement "objects are by default passed by reference" is wrong about PHP because in PHP, you don't pass objects. –  Michael Borgwardt Mar 22 '10 at 13:48
3  
@Michael Yes, it's the same thing (on a reasonable altitude). In C++ objects can be "passed by reference", and even there, under the hood the actual pointer (the reference) is passed by value. And still "objects are passed". The mechanics in PHP are almost identical, and such a pedantic differentiation doesn't make sense. When you pass an object in PHP (of course you do!), you basically pass this object by reference just as C++ does. It doesn't matter how you call that "reference", or "handle" or "identifier". It semantically behaves like a reference, I think for the avg person this suffcies. –  Tom Apr 15 '13 at 12:08
3  
@Tom: we're not "avg persons", we're programmers. Being pedantic is part of being a good programmer, because small differences matter in our work. "Pass by reference" has a specific meaning (I suggest you do some research to find out what it is), and what PHP does is not pass by reference, and it does not pass objects, and it's not semantically the same thing either. –  Michael Borgwardt Apr 15 '13 at 12:25
2  
Still, as I said, from a reasonable altittude they are (conceptually) the same. I don't even see a big difference in the "effective" semantics. Of course on a super low level, they are different, I agree. They behave the same though for a user. Being able to abstract from implementation details and seeing a wider picture is part of being a professional software engineer. I suggest you do some research to find out what it is. –  Tom May 9 '13 at 10:25

http://www.php.net/manual/en/migration5.oop.php

In PHP 5 there is a new Object Model. PHP's handling of objects has been completely rewritten, allowing for better performance and more features. In previous versions of PHP, objects were handled like primitive types (for instance integers and strings). The drawback of this method was that semantically the whole object was copied when a variable was assigned, or passed as a parameter to a method. In the new approach, objects are referenced by handle, and not by value (one can think of a handle as an object's identifier).

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In PHP, By default objects are passed as reference copy to a new Object.

See this example.............

class X {
  var $abc = 10; 
}

class Y {

  var $abc = 20; 
  function changeValue($obj)
  {
   $obj->abc = 30;
  }
}

$x = new X();
$y = new Y();

echo $x->abc; //outputs 10
$y->changeValue($x);
echo $x->abc; //outputs 30

Now see this..............

class X {
  var $abc = 10; 
}

class Y {

  var $abc = 20; 
  function changeValue($obj)
  {
    $obj = new Y();
  }
}

$x = new X();
$y = new Y();

echo $x->abc; //outputs 10
$y->changeValue($x);
echo $x->abc; //outputs 10 not 20 same as java does.

Now see this ..............

class X {
  var $abc = 10; 
}

class Y {

  var $abc = 20; 
  function changeValue(&$obj)
  {
    $obj = new Y();
  }
}

$x = new X();
$y = new Y();

echo $x->abc; //outputs 10
$y->changeValue($x);
echo $x->abc; //outputs 20 not possible in java.

i hope you can understand this.

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This illustrates very well how PHP object handles works. –  Frederik Krautwald Nov 1 at 9:56

PHP variables are assigned by value, passed to functions by value, and when containing/representing objects are passed by reference. You can force variables to pass by reference using an &

Assigned by value/reference example:

$var1 = "test";
$var2 = $var1;
$var2 = "new test";
$var3 = &$var2;
$var3 = "final test";

print ("var1: $var1, var2: $var2, var3: $var3);

would output "var1: test, var2: final test, var3: final test".

Passed by value/reference exampe:

$var1 = "foo";
$var2 = "bar";

changeThem($var1, $var2);

print "var1: $var1, var2: $var2";

function changeThem($var1, &$var2){
    $var1 = "FOO";
    $var2 = "BAR";
}

would output: "var1: foo, var2 BAR".

Object variables passed by reference exampe:

class Foo{
    public $var1;

    function __construct(){
        $this->var1 = "foo";
    }

    public function printFoo(){
        print $this->var1;
    }
}


$foo = new Foo();

changeFoo($foo);

$foo->printFoo();

function changeFoo($foo){
    $foo->var1 = "FOO";
}

Would output: "FOO"

(that last example could be better probably...)

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"Objects" are not values in PHP5 and cannot be "passed". The value of $foo is a pointer to an object. $foo is passed by value to the function changeFoo(), as changeFoo() did not declare its parameter with a &. –  newacct Oct 1 '13 at 0:03

You can do it either way.

put a '&' symbol in front and the variable you are passing becomes one and the same as its origin. ie: you can pass by reference, rather than making a copy of it.

so

    $fred = 5;
    $larry = & $fred;
    $larry = 8;
    echo $fred;//this will output 8, as larry and fred are now the same reference.
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2  
This is deprecated and generates a warning –  fijiaaron Feb 25 '10 at 18:32

Variables containing primitive types are passed by value in PHP5. Variables containing objects are passed by reference. There's quite an interesting article from Linux Journal from 2006 which mentions this and other OO differences between 4 and 5.

http://www.linuxjournal.com/article/9170

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All variables are passed by value in PHP if the parameter of the function has no &. –  newacct Oct 1 '13 at 0:03

Objects are passed by reference in PHP 5 and by value in PHP 4. Variables are passed by value by default!

Read here: http://www.webeks.net/programming/php/ampersand-operator-used-for-assigning-reference.html

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"Objects" are not values in PHP5 and cannot be "passed". All variables are passed by value if the parameter of the function passed to does not have &. –  newacct Oct 1 '13 at 0:04
    
@newacct not quite? Objects are somewhat passed by reference. I think I've observed that php objects can be modified by functions even when not defined with & in front of the parameters in the definition - if they were passed by value the object contained in the scope which called the function with it as a parameter would not be affected. –  Félix Gagnon-Grenier 4 hours ago
1  
@FélixGagnon-Grenier: Again, "objects" are not values and cannot be "passed". You cannot have a "variable" in PHP5 whose value is an "object", you can only have a value that is an object reference (i.e. a pointer to an object). Of course you can pass or assign a pointer to an object by value and modify the object it points to by calling a method that does such modifying. That has nothing to do with pass by reference. What type a value is and whether a parameter is pass-by-value/pass-by-reference are independent and orthogonal things. –  newacct 3 hours ago
class Holder
{
    private $value;

    public function __construct( $value )
    {
        $this->value = $value;
    }

    public function getValue()
    {
        return $this->value;
    }

    public function setValue( $value )
    {
        return $this->value = $value;
    }
}

class Swap
{       
    public function SwapObjects( Holder $x, Holder $y )
    {
        $tmp = $x;

        $x = $y;

        $y = $tmp;
    }

    public function SwapValues( Holder $x, Holder $y )
    {
        $tmp = $x->getValue();

        $x->setValue($y->getValue());

        $y->setValue($tmp);
    }
}


$a1 = new Holder('a');

$b1 = new Holder('b');



$a2 = new Holder('a');

$b2 = new Holder('b');


Swap::SwapValues($a1, $b1);

Swap::SwapObjects($a2, $b2);



echo 'SwapValues: ' . $a2->getValue() . ", " . $b2->getValue() . "<br>";

echo 'SwapObjects: ' . $a1->getValue() . ", " . $b1->getValue() . "<br>";

Attributes are still modifiable when not passed by reference so beware.

Output:

SwapObjects: b, a SwapValues: a, b

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You can pass a variable to a function by reference. This function will be able to modify the original variable.

You can define the passage by reference in the function definition:

<?php
function changeValue(&$var)
{
    $var++;
}

$result=5;
changeValue($result);

echo $result; // $result is 6 here
?>
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Depends on the version, 4 is by value, 5 is by reference.

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5  
I don't think this is true. –  Rosarch Aug 17 '09 at 23:44
    
The excerpt above seems to indicate it is true. –  grantwparks Jun 17 '12 at 20:29

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