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I have a class A, which is parent to classes B and C. And a class X, which is a parent to Y and Z.

class A {};
class B : public A {};
class C : public A {};


class X
{
    void foo(A) { std:: cout << "A"; }
};

class Y : public X
{
    void foo(B) {std::cout << "B"; }
};

class Z : public X
{
    void foo(c) {std<<cout <<"C"; }
};

int main()
{
    B b;
    C c;

    Y y;
    Z z;

    y.foo(b);//prints B // b is a B, and Y::foo takes a B, hence print B
    y.foo(c);//prints A // mismatch between types, fall back and print A
    z.foo(b);//prints A // mismatch between types, fall back and print A
    z.foo(c);//prints C // c is a C, and Y::foo takes a C, hence print C

    std::vector<A> v;
    v.push_back(b);
    v.push_back(c);

    //In this loop, it always prints A, but *this is what I want to change* 
    for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
    {
        z.foo(v.at(i));
        y.foo(v.at(i));
    }
}

Is it possible to get the items to print the same result as the hard coded calls? Meaning that I will treat them as their original type, and not its parent type? or once I put them int a vector of A they will forever be of type A?

share|improve this question
    
y.foo(c); // print A. Surely this is not the desired behaviour? I think you want it to print "B"? I think you need to clarify your desired behaviour. Given p.foo(q), do you want the printed text to depend on the type of q, or on the type of p, or on both? Consider all 9 options {x,y,z}.foo({a,b,c}); and tell us what your desired behaviour is. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 9 '12 at 15:02
    
the desired behaviour are the first prints Meaning y.foo(b) should print B, and y.foo(c) should call the base class x.foo() and print A –  Bg1987 Jan 9 '12 at 16:19
    
OK. So in p.foo(q): If the (dynamic) type of q is the same as the the type of the parameter to p::foo, then that type should be printed. In all other cases, it should print "A". –  Aaron McDaid Jan 9 '12 at 16:32
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What you are seeing is Object Slicing.
You are storing object of Derived class in an vector which is supposed to store objects of Base class, this leads to Object slicing and the derived class specific members of the object being stored get sliced off, thus the object stored in the vector just acts as object of Base class.

Solution:

You should store pointer to object of Base class in the vector:

vector<X*> 

By storing a pointer to Base class there would be no slicing and you can achieve the desired polymorphic behavior as well by making the functions virtual.
The right approach is to use a suitable Smart pointer instead of storing a raw pointer in the vector. That will ensure you do not have to manually manage the memory, RAII will do that for you automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean, change the vector to vector<A*>? –  Bg1987 Jan 9 '12 at 14:52
    
I believe you also need to make the functions virtual as @vasile states, but this is definitely slicing as well. –  greg Jan 9 '12 at 14:55
    
@greg: The OP already stated that the functions are virtual only problem is Op stores objects and not pointers. –  Alok Save Jan 9 '12 at 14:56
    
I don't see any virtual in the question. And I don't see any method calls to to A or B or C. The only methods calls are foo, inside X,Y,Z. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 9 '12 at 14:59
    
@AaronMcDaid: Check OPs response to vasile's answer. –  Alok Save Jan 9 '12 at 15:00
show 5 more comments

This is called slicing. When you push_back your elements into a std::vector<A> it basically copies the elements into newly constructed instances of A. Therefore the part ofs of the object, which come from the derived class will be lost ("sliced off").

In order to avoid slicing you need to use a container which stores pointers instead of elements, so you should use a std::vector<A*> or if your elements are heap allocated preferably a vector of some sort of smartpointer (std::shared_ptr or std::unique_ptr in C++11, boost::shared_ptr or std::tr1::shared_ptr otherwise).

However your code won't work as written, even if you change that: X, Y and Z all take their parameter by value, while all elements in your vector will have the type A*, so dereferencing them would yield A, so it will still call the wrong method. This could be solved by changing the signatures to always take A& or A* and using dynamic_cast to try casting that into the type:

class X
{
    void foo(A*) { std:: cout << "A"; }
};

class Y : public X
{
    void foo(A* p) { 
      if(dynamic_cast<B*>(p) std::cout << "B"; // requires virtual methods in A
      else                   X::foo(p);
    }
};

class Z : public X
{
    void foo(A*){ 
      if(dynamic_cast<C*>(p) std::cout << "C"; // requires virtual methods in A
      else                   X::foo(p);
    }
};

Of course dynamic_cast is a bit costly, but if that's a problem you might want to rethink your design. Furthermore you need to ensure that A, B, C contain some virtual methods (a virtual destructor would be a good idea here anyways), since otherwise dynamic_cast won't work)

share|improve this answer
    
I think you've nailed it, it should print "B" or "C" if and only if there is a match between the dynamic type of the parameter and the type desired by X,Y,Z. I've edited the question a little, based on comments from the OP. –  Aaron McDaid Jan 9 '12 at 16:44
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use the virtual keyword:

class X
{
    virtual void foo(A) { std:: cout << "A"; }
};

Now, it will find at runtime the function specific for each object - B or C.

EDIT

you can still make it pure virtual:

class X
{
    virtual void foo(A) = 0;
};

if that suits you. Of course, you'll not be able to have objects of type A

share|improve this answer
    
i'm sorry it is actually virtual, i forgot to add it to example here. –  Bg1987 Jan 9 '12 at 14:54
    
No it wont, OP is not storing pointers but just objects of the Base class. –  Alok Save Jan 9 '12 at 14:54
    
@Als, you're right. –  sammy Jan 9 '12 at 15:01
    
Making the method virtual won't make any difference (even if the objects weren't sliced to A before calling it), since foo is not invoked through a pointer to baseclass. So the compiler would take the methods from the derived object, if they had a matching signature anyways. –  Grizzly Jan 9 '12 at 15:14
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