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I cant figure out what is wrong with my styles.
Hope someone could help me with this.
Code example:

<style type="text/css">
.maindiv {
    overflow:hidden; border:#000 1px solid;
    width:450px; min-height:250px;
}
.left_inner {
    float:left; width:200px;
    min-height:100%; background:#00CC33;
}
.right_inner {
    float:left; width:150px; background:#C93;
}
</style>
<div class="maindiv">
    <div class="left_inner">Left Block content</div>
    <div class="right_inner">Right block content<br />sample txt<br />sample txt</div>
</div>

The way it should be is like in Opera Browser (see image): Sample image

share|improve this question
1  
Are you open for other positioning (position:absolute)? –  danijar Jan 9 '12 at 14:57
    
Using inline-block is not the best way to come across doing anything. Instead, use float: left; . –  iamaaron Jan 9 '12 at 15:00
    
Do you have a doctype? –  Mr Lister Jan 9 '12 at 15:01
    
He's not trying to get the elements to position, he's trying to get them to "stretch" "100%". –  iamaaron Jan 9 '12 at 15:01
1  
a absolute positioned div makes all you want with its size. Floated elements sometimes need cear elements (helper). –  danijar Jan 9 '12 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The How

http://jsfiddle.net/L9GEa/

The Why

  1. One might intuitively assume (as I once did) that the html element already has a determined height, but it does not (at least in this context). Luckily (or by design) this one element has the unique property of it's height being determinable when it is assigned a percentage height. That is the essential concept because in order to calculate (determine) the height of any other element which is assigned a percentage height you must also be able to determine the height of it's parent.
  2. Anyone that has worked with CSS and the DOM enough likely will tell you they hate floats. This is because it pulls the element out of the flow, which requires additional work and thinking to juggle the effects. Instead use display:inline-block;vertical-align:top; with the one caveat that you will then have to add html comments around any white space between those elements.

The CSS

.maindiv {
    overflow:hidden; border:#000 1px solid;
    width:450px;min-height:250px;
    /*changes*/
    height:100%;
}
.left_inner {
    float:left; width:200px;
    min-height:100%; background:#00CC33;
    /*changes*/
    float:none;
    display:inline-block;
    vertical-align:top;
}
.right_inner {
    float:left; width:150px; background:#C93;
    /*changes*/
    float:none;
    display:inline-block;
    vertical-align:top;
}
/*changes*/
html,
body{
    height:100%;
}

The HTML

<div class="maindiv">
    <div class="left_inner">Left Block content</div><!--
    --><div class="right_inner">Right block content<br />sample txt<br />sample txt</div>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
This solution worked for me, so I marked it as best answer. Thank you. –  wzazza Sep 18 '13 at 16:10

add

html,
body {
  height:100%
}

at the top of your css, that works for me

EDIT: my test :

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

<head>
<style>
html,
body {
height:100%;
}

.maindiv {
   overflow:hidden; border:#000 1px solid;
    width:450px; height:100%;
position:relative;
}
.left_inner {
    float:left; width:200px;
    min-height:100%; background:#00CC33;
position:relative;
}
.right_inner {
    float:left; width:150px; background:#C93;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
<div class="maindiv">
<div class="left_inner">Left Block content</div>
<div class="right_inner">Right block content<br />sample txt<br />sample txt</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

Try this:

    <style type="text/css">
.maindiv {
    overflow:hidden; border:#000 1px solid;
    width:450px; height: auto; min-height:250px;
}
.left_inner {
    float:left; width:200px;
    min-height:100%; height: 100%; background:#00CC33;
}
.right_inner {
    float:left; width:150px; background:#C93;
}
</style>
<div class="maindiv">
    <div class="left_inner">Left Block content</div>
    <div class="right_inner">Right block content<br />sample txt<br />sample txt</div>
</div>

Most of the time you have to apply a height of auto or 100% to the parent DIV.

share|improve this answer
    
works also with pixel height for the outer div. –  danijar Jan 9 '12 at 15:05
    
This didn't worked. –  wzazza Jan 9 '12 at 15:09
    
@sharethis: You cannot achieve a CSS RULE at 100% if you apply the value at a pixel-base. –  iamaaron Jan 9 '12 at 15:11
    
I think he want to left inner div to be 100% of the outer (pixel-valued) div. –  danijar Jan 9 '12 at 15:13
    
And yes the pixel height for the outer div works, but the content can be much more larger that height. Thats why I need min-height or height:auto but they work only in Opera –  wzazza Jan 9 '12 at 15:14

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