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In bash I need to run a script that loops from i=1 to i=99999999 but it always run out of memory. Is there any workaround? or is there a max value for i?

first=1
last=99999999
randomString="CXCXQOOPSOIS"

for val in $( seq $first $last )
do
  padVal=$( printf "%010d\n" $val )
  hash=$( echo -n $randomString$padVal | md5sum )
  if [[ "$hash" =~ ^000000) ]]; then
    echo "Number: $val"  >> log_000000
    echo "$val added to log - please check."
  fi
done
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2  
What is inside the loop? I assume it's not empty? –  Joachim Isaksson Jan 9 '12 at 15:02
    
It seems that loop allocates a new memory each cycle and overall allocated memory size reached a system limit, it is not possible giving you a concrete advice without seeing a loop code. –  sll Jan 9 '12 at 15:06
    
for the values of i, i actually append it to a string and then md5 hash it. when a hash comes up with say ^123123, i want to break from the loop. –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 15:14
2  
And you didn't think your problem was the size of the string, as opposed to the loop? –  Scott Hunter Jan 9 '12 at 15:19
1  
I assumed he meant he was adding each number to a fixed string. I.e. "foo123", "foo124", "foo125". Password cracking, perhaps? –  ghoti Jan 9 '12 at 15:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

bash provides C-like syntax for loop:

first=1
last=99999999
randomString="CXCXQOOPSOIS"

for ((val=$first; val<$last; val++))
do
  padVal=$( printf "%010d\n" $val )
  hash=$( echo -n $randomString$padVal | md5sum )
  if [[ "$hash" =~ ^000000) ]]; then
    echo "Number: $val"  >> log_000000
    echo "$val added to log - please check."
  fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
will this be better, memory wise? –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 16:31
1  
Yes, vastly better; it generates one number at a time, not 100 million up front. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 9 '12 at 16:38
    
thanks for the advice. just started shell scripting and having quite a bit of fun! –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 16:43

Your seq command generates 100 million numbers (bar a couple) and requires 800 MiB or so of memory to hold just the list of digits (probably an under-estimate; each number might be held in a separate memory allocation, which might mean 8 bytes for a pointer and 16 bytes for the allocated block, which triples the storage space estimate).

You can improve things dramatically by using:

for millions in $(seq 0 99)
do
    for smallstuff in $(seq -f "%6.0f" 0 999999)
    do
        val="$millions$smallstuff"
        ...
    done
done

This dramatically reduces the amount of memory needed; the only issue to watch is that it tests 0 which your original code did not.

share|improve this answer
    
what does the line for millions in $(seq 0 99) do? –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 16:02
    
It generates strings 0 to 99 (one hundred strings of up to 2 characters each). Actually, you probably want to use: for millions in "" $(seq 1 99) to generate an empty prefix. Also, the inner loop generates leading zeroes on the small stuff; if that matters, you have to be a bit more careful, but the basic idea of breaking up the loop so that you don't generate 100 million strings at the start still stands. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 9 '12 at 16:37
    
thank you for the in-dept explanation! –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 16:45

If you still want to use seq => therefore separate seq and the loop using a pipe: |
This solution is more portable and can be used on other shells.
The memory print is still reduced, but this script requires to process two threads.

first=1
last=99999999
randomString="CXCXQOOPSOIS"

seq $first $last |
while read val
do
  padVal=$( printf "%010d\n" $val )
  hash=$( echo -n $randomString$padVal | md5sum )
  if [[ "$hash" =~ ^000000) ]]; then
    echo "Number: $val"  >> log_000000
    echo "$val added to log - please check."
  fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
i don't necessarily need to use seq, will the c like for loop be a better option? –  John Marston Jan 9 '12 at 16:35
    
The C loop is probably the best option; this is a valid alternative. Both are better than my solution, though my diagnosis of the cause of the trouble stands. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 9 '12 at 16:39

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