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I'm programming in JSF2 and netbeans creates many pages with #{} that contains an expression.

However sometimes on the web I found ${} for the same thing!

Are there any differences? What are they?

Google ignores the characters # and $ so it makes it difficult to search for.

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possible duplicate of Difference between JSP EL, JSF EL and Unified EL. The above is also mentioned in the our EL wiki page (put your mouse above the [el] tag below the question and click the info link in the black popbox which shows). –  BalusC Jan 9 '12 at 16:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 33 down vote accepted

#{} are for deferred expressions (deferred expressions are resolved depending on the lifecycle of the page) and can be used to read or write from or to a bean or to make a method call. ${} are expressions for immediate resolution, as soon as they are encountered they are resolved. They are read-only. You can read more here: http://docs.oracle.com/javaee/6/tutorial/doc/bnahr.html

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@ fortunato : thank you for your answer! –  Filippo1980 Jan 9 '12 at 16:26

A google search for "Java Server Faces dollar pound" gave the following result, from the JBoss Expression Language FAQ:

Why do some expressions start with pound and others start with dollar sign?

For the EL specification itself, there is no difference. It is up to the technology using the EL to decide what it means. For both JSP and JSF, expressions that start with a pound sign mean deferred evaluation and a dollar sign means immediate evaluation. This all has to do with when the expression will actually be evaluated during request processing. The pound sign is used in JSF components because we want the expression to be evaluated by the JSF lifecycle and not by the JSP or Facelets engine.

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@ jean hominal : thanmk you for your answer... as I wrote I tried to search using $ and # and it didn't work... howecver I didn't know that you call # "pound"! So thank you for this information too! –  Filippo1980 Jan 9 '12 at 16:31

That's a good question! I faced it once and like you, had a lot of trouble finding the answer... until I stumbled upon this piece of documentation:

One key feature of the unified EL is its support for both immediate and deferred evaluation of expressions. Immediate evaluation means that the JSP engine evaluates the expression and returns the result immediately when the page is first rendered. Deferred evaluation means that the technology using the expression language can employ its own machinery to evaluate the expression sometime later during the page's life cycle, whenever it is appropriate to do so. Those expressions that are evaluated immediately use the ${} syntax, which was introduced with the JSP 2.0 expression language. Expressions whose evaluation is deferred use the #{} syntax, which was introduced with by JavaServer Faces technology.

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@ oscar lopez : thank you! –  Filippo1980 Jan 9 '12 at 16:33

JSF EL uses a hash (#) where the JSP EL uses dollar sign ($) in jsf1.2 both syntaxes were unified

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can you provide some documentation that supports this unification –  dakait Jan 3 '13 at 12:30
    
    
+1 for replying and providing the links –  dakait Jan 6 '13 at 18:49

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