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How do you calculate Spearman correlation by group in R. I found the following link talking about Pearson correlation by group. But when I tried to replace the type with spearman, it does not work.

http://stats.stackexchange.com/questions/4040/r-compute-correlation-by-group

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

How about this for a base R solution:

df <- data.frame(group = rep(c("G1", "G2"), each = 10),
                 var1 = rnorm(20),
                 var2 = rnorm(20))

r <- by(df, df$group, FUN = function(X) cor(X$var1, X$var2, method = "spearman"))
# df$group: G1
# [1] 0.4060606
# ------------------------------------------------------------ 
# df$group: G2
# [1] 0.1272727

And then, if you want the results in the form of a data.frame:

data.frame(group = dimnames(r)[[1]], corr = as.vector(r))
#   group      corr
# 1    G1 0.4060606
# 2    G2 0.1272727

EDIT: If you prefer a plyr-based solution, here is one:

library(plyr)
ddply(df, .(group), summarise, "corr" = cor(var1, var2, method = "spearman"))
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Thank you Josh for the prompt reply. They all worked!!! ;-) –  user1009166 Jan 9 '12 at 18:31
    
(+1) Nice answer. What about r <- by(df, df$group, FUN = function(X) cor(df[,-1], method = "spearman"))? –  MYaseen208 Jan 9 '12 at 19:45
    
@MYaseen208. Thanks. The code you give returns something slightly different. I don't know its name, but its like a variance-covariance matrix, except with a correlation in each cell. The code I used returns, instead, a single scalar correlation for each group. –  Josh O'Brien Jan 9 '12 at 20:35
    
@Myaseen208 I toyed around with something like that too but as Josh mentions it doesn't produce the same output. When you throw a matrix/dataframe into cor it spits back out a matrix. If you comma separate your vectors it just spits out the correlation between those two. –  Dason Jan 10 '12 at 17:00
    
Great post Josh, plyr is a valuable tool. –  KLDavenport Mar 4 '13 at 22:00

Here's another way to do it:

# split the data by group then apply spearman correlation
# to each element of that list
j <- lapply(split(df, df$group), function(x){cor(x[,2], x[,3], method = "spearman")})

# Bring it together
data.frame(group = names(j), corr = unlist(j), row.names = NULL)

Comparing my method, Josh's method, and the plyr solution using rbenchmark:

Dason <- function(){
    # split the data by group then apply spearman correlation
    # to each element of that list
    j <- lapply(split(df, df$group), function(x){cor(x[,2], x[,3], method = "spearman")})

    # Bring it together
    data.frame(group = names(j), corr = unlist(j), row.names = NULL)
}

Josh <- function(){
    r <- by(df, df$group, FUN = function(X) cor(X$var1, X$var2, method = "spearman"))
    data.frame(group = attributes(r)$dimnames[[1]], corr = as.vector(r))
}

plyr <- function(){
    ddply(df, .(group), summarise, "corr" = cor(var1, var2, method = "spearman"))
}


library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(Dason(), Josh(), plyr())

Which gives the output

> benchmark(Dason(), Josh(), plyr())
     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
1 Dason()          100    0.19 1.000000      0.19        0         NA        NA
2  Josh()          100    0.24 1.263158      0.22        0         NA        NA
3  plyr()          100    0.51 2.684211      0.52        0         NA        NA

So it appears my method is slightly faster but not by much. I think Josh's method is a little more intuitive. The plyr solution is the easiest to code up but it's not the fastest (but it sure is a lot more convenient)!

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Thanks for thinking to test those out with benchmark. +1 for putting that together. I have a couple of additional comments. (1) On repeated calls to benchmark, the usual difference between the lapply(split(...) and by(...) approaches is more like 7-10%. (2) If you're interested in pursuing this further, it'd probably be more useful to test the three methods on some large data.frames, with 1000+ groups and 1e6+ rows. Cheers! –  Josh O'Brien Jan 9 '12 at 17:48
    
Thanks Dason too for your time!! –  user1009166 Jan 9 '12 at 18:32

If you want an efficient solution for large numbers of groups then data.table is the way to go.

library(data.table)
DT <- as.data.table(df)
setkey(DT, group)
DT[,list(corr = cor(var1,var2,method = 'spearman')), by = group]
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+1 Note the setkey is optional. Keyed-by is only faster than unkeyed-by for very large datasets (e.g. 1e7 rows+) where there are a lot of large groups as well. Unkeyed-by is already pretty fast. –  Matt Dowle Sep 19 '12 at 8:54

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