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I have the following code that cannot be compiled:

#include <iostream>
#include <set>
#include <functional>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;

struct StringCompareNoRegister: public binary_function<string, string, bool> {
  bool operator()(string const& lhs, string const& rhs) const {
    return (_stricmp(lhs.c_str(), rhs.c_str()) < 0);
  }
};

int wmain() {
  set<string, StringCompareNoRegister> s;
  s.insert("hello");
  s.insert("STL");
  s.insert("Hello");
  wcout << s.find("Hello")->c_str() << endl;
  wcout << find(s.begin(), s.end(), "Hello")->c_str() << endl;

  return 0;
}

MVCPP v.11 CTP compiler yelling on the last line where std::find is used:

Error 1 error C2678: binary '==' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc>' (or there is no acceptable conversion) c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\xutility 3171

Why I cannot compile this code? What have I done wrong?

UPDATE: Full compiler output

1>------ Build started: Project: Test01, Configuration: Debug Win32 ------ 1> main.cpp 1>c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\xutility(3171): error C2678: binary '==' : no operator found which takes a left-hand operand of type 'const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc>' (or there is no acceptable conversion) 1> with 1> [ 1> _Elem=char, 1> _Traits=std::char_traits, 1>
_Alloc=std::allocator 1> ] 1> could be 'built-in C++ operator==(const char [6], const char [6])' 1>
c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\exception(488): or 'bool std::operator ==(const std::_Exception_ptr &,const std::_Exception_ptr &)' 1>
c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\exception(493): or 'bool std::operator ==(std::_Null_type,const std::_Exception_ptr &)' 1> c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\exception(499): or 'bool std::operator ==(const std::_Exception_ptr &,std::_Null_type)' 1> c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\system_error(419): or
'bool std::operator ==(const std::error_code &,const std::error_condition &)' 1> c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\system_error(427): or 'bool std::operator ==(const std::error_condition &,const std::error_code &)' 1> c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\tuple(537): or 'bool std::operator ==(const std::tuple<> &,const std::tuple<> &)' 1> while trying to match the argument list '(const std::basic_string<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc>, const char [6])' 1>
with 1> [ 1> _Elem=char, 1>
_Traits=std::char_traits, 1> _Alloc=std::allocator 1> ] 1> c:\program files (x86)\microsoft visual studio 11.0\vc\include\xutility(3204) : see reference to function template instantiation '_InIt std::_Find,const char[6]>(_InIt,_InIt,_Ty (&))' being compiled 1> with 1>
[ 1>
_InIt=std::_Tree_unchecked_const_iterator,std::allocator>>>>, 1>
_Mytree=std::_Tree_val,std::allocator>>>, 1> _Ty=const char [6] 1> ] 1>
d:\docs\programming\test01\test01\main.cpp(39) : see reference to function template instantiation '_InIt std::find,const char[6]>(_InIt,_InIt,_Ty (&))' being compiled 1> with 1>
[ 1>
_InIt=std::_Tree_const_iterator,std::allocator>>>>, 1>
_Mytree=std::_Tree_val,std::allocator>>>, 1> _Ty=const char [6] 1> ] ========== Build: 0 succeeded, 1 failed, 0 up-to-date, 0 skipped ==========

share|improve this question
    
Strange. After adding appropriate headers, etc., this works for me with GCC. –  Kaz Dragon Jan 9 '12 at 17:01
    
Works fine on VC2010. –  hmjd Jan 9 '12 at 17:02
    
It seems that something wrong with MVCPP11 STL realization (or compiler)... –  DaddyM Jan 9 '12 at 17:06
    
Please post the full code. Is string really std::string? –  phresnel Jan 9 '12 at 17:51
1  
Couple of things to try: explicitly convert "Hello" to a std::string in the std::find call. Pass your functor to the std::find call. As it stands currently, your functor will not be used in that call, it'll use operator==. Also, could you post the entire build output (there's some additional diagnostics that appear to be missing). –  Nathan Ernst Jan 9 '12 at 18:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ops. The precise answer is that I've forgotten to add <string> header to includes. String header contains external (non-member) std::string comparison functions like operator==, operator<, etc.

Thank you very much for your answers.

share|improve this answer

std::find does not use custom comparators in the same way. You need to overload the == operator.

The behavior is expected something like the below. Check cplusplus.com for the reference.

template<class InputIterator, class T>
  InputIterator find ( InputIterator first, InputIterator last, const T& value )
  {
    for ( ;first!=last; first++) if ( *first==value ) break;
    return first;
  }

So you would expect something like this if you were using a custom type.

struct Foo {
    Foo(const std::string &s_) : s(s_) {}
    std::string s;
    // used by std::set<Foo, Foo::Less>::find
    struct Less {
        bool operator()(const Foo &lhs, const Foo &rhs) const {
            return lhs.s.compare(rhs.s) < 0;
        }
    };
};

// used by std::find
bool operator==(const Foo &lhs, const Foo &rhs) {
    return lhs.s.compare(rhs.s) == 0;
}

int main(int argc, char ** argv) {
    std::set<Foo, Foo::Less> foos;
    foos.insert(Foo("hello"));
    foos.insert(Foo("STL"));
    foos.insert(Foo("Hello"));

    std::cout << foos.find(Foo("Hello"))->s.c_str() << std::endl;
    std::cout << find(foos.begin(), foos.end(), Foo("Hello"))->s << std::endl;
    return 0;
}   

Linux just found the operator for std::string, so I couldn't test your specific behavior. You may need to add some includes.

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

Otherwise, defining your own is pretty painless.

bool operator==(const std::string &lhs, const std::string &rhs) {
    return lhs.compare(rhs) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Tom. Please, clarify: can I define operator==(string const &lhs, string const &rhs) somehow without the wrapper code? –  DaddyM Jan 9 '12 at 21:33
1  
@DaddyM Yea, should be fine. –  Tom Kerr Jan 9 '12 at 21:48

Hmm, try changing your functor args to bool operator()(const string & lhs, const string & rhs). See if that helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
string const &param and const string &param are the same. But I've followed your advice and unfortunately nothing had changed :( –  DaddyM Jan 9 '12 at 17:05

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