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I have a list of strings. Each string follows the pattern "{Path}\UpdateTo{Version}-{Order}".

I need to sort the list such that the lowest version numbers are at the top. In the case when there is multiple files with the same version number then an optional order parameter is appended. If an order is present on any of the strings then it should appear above the strings with the same version number that do not have an order number.

For example, give the following list (note the items are randomly ordered):

var files = new List<string>() {
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.4",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.1",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-1",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-1"
};

The result would be:

var files = new List<string>() {
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.1",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-1",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.4",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-1",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-2",
    @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5"
}

I've been trying with all sorts of ideas but so far my attempts have been a complete mess. I'd appreciate it if someone could help. Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Can you give examples of what you've tried? –  Samuel Slade Jan 9 '12 at 17:02
    
Unless your versions go higher than 9, .9 etc you could just use alphabetic sorting, otherwise you'll need to write your own simple comperator. –  dtech Jan 9 '12 at 17:05
    
I'm assuming the paths may be mixed? –  James Michael Hare Jan 9 '12 at 17:05
1  
@dtech: A custom comparison is already needed because the -{Order} part takes priority over a version that does not have one. –  Austin Salonen Jan 9 '12 at 17:06
    
Austin is correct. Without the {Order} parameter then you could just order it alphabetically. –  nfplee Jan 10 '12 at 8:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I used a temporary class to handle the parsing and the comparisons to get the desired output. I've included code that gets everything back to how you requested it but the "temporary" class introduced may have more value to you over just the paths (?).

Usage:

var sorted = files.Select(f => new UpdateTo(f))
    .OrderBy(u => u)
    .Select(u => u.Path)
    .ToArray();

The code:

class UpdateTo : IComparable<UpdateTo>
{
    public decimal Version { get; private set; }
    public int Order { get; private set; }
    public string Path { get; private set; }

    private const string Prefix = "UpdateTo";

    public UpdateTo(string path)
    {
        /* No error-checking here -- BEWARE!! */
        Path = path;

        string toParse = Path.Substring(Path.IndexOf(Prefix, StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase) + Prefix.Length);
        var split = toParse.Split('-');

        Version = decimal.Parse(split[0]);
        Order = split.Length == 2 ? int.Parse(split[1]) : int.MaxValue;
    }

    public int CompareTo(UpdateTo other)
    {
        int versionCompare = Version.CompareTo(other.Version);
        return versionCompare == 0 ? Order.CompareTo(other.Order) : versionCompare;
    }
}

And the test...

[Test]
public void ListSort()
{
    const string first = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.1";
    const string second = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-1";
    const string third = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2-2";
    const string fourth = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.2";
    const string fifth = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.4";
    const string sixth = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-1";
    const string seventh = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5-2";
    const string eighth = @"C:\Migrations\UpdateTo1.5";

    var files = new List<string>{third, seventh, fourth, fifth, first, eighth, second, sixth};

    var sorted = files.Select(f => new UpdateTo(f))
        .OrderBy(u => u)
        .Select(u => u.Path)
        .ToArray();

    Assert.AreEqual(first, sorted[0]);
    Assert.AreEqual(second, sorted[1]);
    Assert.AreEqual(third, sorted[2]);
    Assert.AreEqual(fourth, sorted[3]);
    Assert.AreEqual(fifth, sorted[4]);
    Assert.AreEqual(sixth, sorted[5]);
    Assert.AreEqual(seventh, sorted[6]);
    Assert.AreEqual(eighth, sorted[7]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. It was my favourite one as it was simple to follow along and i had attempted something similar but failed miserably lol. –  nfplee Jan 10 '12 at 8:57
files.Sort(delegate(string str1, string str2)
{
    var pattern = @"(?<version>\d.*?$)";
    var version1 = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Match(str1, pattern).Groups["version"].Value;
    var version2 = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Match(str2, pattern).Groups["version"].Value;

    // TODO: Implement your version comparison logic here 
    return string.Compare(version1, version2);
});

Update

A sample comparison logic implementation would be:

files.Sort(delegate(string str1, string str2)
{
    var pattern = @"(?<version>\d.*?$)";
    var version1 = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Match(str1, pattern).Groups["version"].Value;
    var version2 = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Match(str2, pattern).Groups["version"].Value;

    if (version1 == version2) return 0;

    // version1 != version2

    var major1 = float.Parse(version1.Split('-')[0]);
    var major2 = float.Parse(version2.Split('-')[0]);

    if (major1 > major2) return 1; // version1 > version2
    if (major1 < major2) return -1; // version1 < version2

    // major1 = major2

    if (version1.Split('-').Length > version2.Split('-').Length) return -1;
    if (version1.Split('-').Length < version2.Split('-').Length) return 1;

    var minor1 = float.Parse(version1.Split('-')[1]);
    var minor2 = float.Parse(version2.Split('-')[1]);

    return Comparer<float>.Default.Compare(minor1, minor2);
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. It worked perfectly however i have accepted Austin's answer as i liked the LINQ approach. –  nfplee Jan 10 '12 at 9:09

You could try the following:

// Warning! To keep this code clean I
// left out all error handling. Use at own risk.
//
// requires using System.Linq;
private int VersionSortingValue(string s)
{
    int res = 0;
    string[] items = s.Split('.', '-');
    if(items.Length != 3)
    {
        res = 1;
    }

    return (int.Parse(items[0]) << 1) + res;
}

// actual sorting:
var prefix = "UpdateTo";

Func<string, string> getVersion = 
    x => x.Substring(x.LastIndexOf(prefix) + prefix.Length);

files = files
    .OrderBy(x => VersionSortingValue(getVersion(x))
    .ThenBy(x => getVersion(x))
    .ToList();

if the version number becomes larger, you should consider using a natural sort.

share|improve this answer
    
Note the differences between the second item in the desired list and this output. –  Austin Salonen Jan 9 '12 at 17:25
    
Yeah. The improved version should be capable of handling this. –  Nuffin Jan 9 '12 at 22:18
    
Not quite there, always orders by {Order} first. I have already accepted Austin's answer but thanks anyway. –  nfplee Jan 10 '12 at 9:06

Here is another (somewhat terser, but maybe less readable) version using LINQ:

int prefixLength = "UpdateTo".Length;

var sorted = from file in files
             let fileName = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(file)
             let versionString = fileName.Substring(prefixLength, fileName.Length - prefixLength).Replace('-', '.')
             let version = new Version(versionString)
             orderby version
             select file;

Update: The refined version below takes the special case regarding the order value into account:

var sorted = from file in files
             let fileName = System.IO.Path.GetFileName(file)
             let versionString = fileName.Substring(prefixLength, fileName.Length - prefixLength).Replace('-', '.')
             let modified = versionString.IndexOf('.') == versionString.LastIndexOf('.') ? versionString + "." + Int32.MaxValue.ToString() : versionString
             let version = new Version(modified)
             orderby version
             select file;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer but it doesn't handle the order parameter. However nice idea of changing the hyphen to a decimal. I guess you could add a really high last number when no order parameter is present. –  nfplee Jan 10 '12 at 9:02
    
Sorry about that. I didn't read the requirement wrt the order number carefully enough. –  afrischke Jan 10 '12 at 9:08

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