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Here is my code snippet

main() {

    char *filename;

    if(1 > 2) {
      filename = "file.txt"
     }

     if(filename != NULL (also tried 0) {
       do something
     }
     return 0;
    }

My question is how to check if filename var have assigned value. I can use strcmp but rvalue can be different of "file.txt"

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1  
Always initialize your variables! (pointers to NULL) –  Dan Fego Jan 9 '12 at 17:59
    
I have read somewhere that extern variables are automatically initialized to 0. –  summerc Jan 9 '12 at 18:03
    
@user1074077: not in C or C++, but yes in Java and many other languages. –  maerics Jan 9 '12 at 18:05
    
@user1074077: in C, static variables are, I believe, but it's good practice to always do it. Then you never have to wonder what value a variable has. –  Dan Fego Jan 9 '12 at 18:07
    
we can not definitely rely on 'variable will be automatically assigned to so and so' –  Prashant Rane Jan 9 '12 at 18:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change:

char *filename;

To:

char *filename = NULL;

Then your NULL tests will work.

When you don't initialize this pointer, its value is undefined. That's why your tests were failing. The compiler assumed that you didn't care what value it had.

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1  
It's worth noting that the reason this assignment is necessary is that C does not store any value in a variable's memory when it is allocated unless you provide one. –  maerics Jan 9 '12 at 18:01
    
@maerics: I was just thinking the same thing. Edited. –  Drew Dormann Jan 9 '12 at 18:04
1  
If you are using GCC, compiling with the -Wuninitialized option enabled will help catch these issues. Cf. delorie.com/gnu/docs/gcc/gcc_8.html –  Alex Reynolds Jan 9 '12 at 18:27

You must initialize the pointer yourself, it doesn't have a guaranteed starting value otherwise.

char *filename = NULL;
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Whenever you declare (or define) a variable, initialize them to 0 or NULL (if pointers) and then check it against them!

For example,

int i = 0;

.. 
if (!i) {

}

For pointers,

int *p = NULL;

..
if (!p) {

}
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