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I want to write a function template that can take variable number of template arguments, and just print out the typeid().name() of the type parameters. I can do something like that using static functions inside class templates as follows :

template<typename...>
struct foo;

template<typename H, typename... T>
struct foo<H, T...> {
  static void print() {
    std::cout << typeid(H).name() << ", ";
    foo<T...>::print();
  }
};

template<typename H>
struct foo<H> {
  static void print() {
    std::cout << typeid(H).name() << "\n";
  }
};

int main(void)
{
  foo<int, float>::print();
  return 0;
}

However, I am not able to do the following :

template<typename H, typename... T>
void print() {
  std::cout << typeid(H).name() << ", ";
  print<T...>();
}
int main(void)
{
  print<int, float>();
  return 0;
}

I tried adding the following "base" cases :

template<typename H>
void print();

and

void print();

Neither worked. How do I write such a function template?

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1  
What error message were you getting? –  templatetypedef Jan 9 '12 at 19:14
    
Your class template specializations are ambiguous. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 9 '12 at 19:48
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3 Answers

FWIW, I could get the following code to compile with Clang 3.1 and GCC 4.5.1:

#include <typeinfo>
#include <iostream>

template<class T>
void print(){
  std::cout << typeid(T).name();
}

template<typename H, typename T, typename... R>
void print(){
  std::cout << typeid(H).name() << ", ";
  print<T, R...>();
}

int main(){
  print<int, float>();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this works. It didn't occur to me that handling 2 or more template arguments in the main case, and handling 1 argument in the base case is the right solution. I was trying to do 1 or more in the general case and 0 in the base case. The main take away, for me at least, is typename... A matches 0 or more arguments. –  keveman Jan 9 '12 at 20:51
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template<typename H>
void print();

This won't work because it is ambiguous with the variadic overload: both can be called with a single template argument.

void print();

This doesn't work because in your variadic print you're calling print<T...> which can only ever match a print template, not a regular function (even when T... expands to an empty argument list, the call will be print<>(), not print().)

One solution is to change your variadic case to only accept at least two arguments:

template<typename H, typename T1, typename... TRest>
void print() {
  std::cout << typeid(H).name() << ", ";
  print<T1, T...>();
}

Now your one-argument print template should be correctly selected at the bottom of the recursion.

I think the following should work in C++11 as a zero-argument base case, but I couldn't get gcc 4.6 to accept it:

template<> void print();
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You could alternatively do this:

void print() {/*...*/} 

template<typename X>   void print() {/*...*/} 

template<typename X, typename Y>   void print() {/*...*/} 

int main()
{
  print();
  print<int>();
  print<int,double>();

  return 0;
}
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This doesn't handle more than 2 template arguments. –  keveman Jan 9 '12 at 20:52
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