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The title is the question. Below is my attempt to answer it through research. But I don't trust my uninformed research so I still pose the question (What is the fastest way to iterate through individual characters in a string in C#?).

Occasionally I want to cycle through the characters of a string one-by-one, such as when parsing for nested tokens -- something which cannot be done with regular expressions. I am wondering what the fastest way is to iterate through the individual characters in a string, particularly very large strings.

I did a bunch of testing myself and my results are below. However there are many readers with much more in depth knowledge of the .NET CLR and C# compiler so I don't know if I'm missing something obvious, or if I made a mistake in my test code. So I solicit your collective response. If anyone has insight into how the string indexer actually works that would be very helpful. (Is it a C# language feature compiled into something else behind the scenes? Or something built in to the CLR?).

The first method using a stream was taken directly from the accepted answer from the thread: how to generate a stream from a string?

Tests

longString is a 99.1 million character string consisting of 89 copies of the plain-text version of the C# language specification. Results shown are for 20 iterations. Where there is a 'startup' time (such as for the first iteration of the implicitly created array in method #3), I tested that separately, such as by breaking from the loop after the first iteration.

Results

From my tests, caching the string in a char array using the ToCharArray() method is the fastest for iterating over the entire string. The ToCharArray() method is an upfront expense, and subsequent access to individual characters is slightly faster than the built in index accessor.

                                           milliseconds
                                ---------------------------------
 Method                         Startup  Iteration  Total  StdDev
------------------------------  -------  ---------  -----  ------
 1 index accessor                     0        602    602       3
 2 explicit convert ToCharArray     165        410    582       3
 3 foreach (c in string.ToCharArray)168        455    623       3
 4 StringReader                       0       1150   1150      25
 5 StreamWriter => Stream           405       1940   2345      20
 6 GetBytes() => StreamReader       385       2065   2450      35
 7 GetBytes() => BinaryReader       385       5465   5850      80
 8 foreach (c in string)              0        960    960       4

Update: Per @Eric's comment, here are results for 100 iterations over a more normal 1.1 M char string (one copy of the C# spec). Indexer and char arrays are still fastest, followed by foreach(char in string), followed by stream methods.

                                           milliseconds
                                ---------------------------------
 Method                         Startup  Iteration  Total  StdDev
------------------------------  -------  ---------  -----  ------
 1 index accessor                     0        6.6    6.6    0.11
 2 explicit convert ToCharArray     2.4        5.0    7.4    0.30
 3 for(c in string.ToCharArray)     2.4        4.7    7.1    0.33
 4 StringReader                       0       14.0   14.0    1.21
 5 StreamWriter => Stream           5.3       21.8   27.1    0.46
 6 GetBytes() => StreamReader       4.4       23.6   28.0    0.65
 7 GetBytes() => BinaryReader       5.0       61.8   66.8    0.79
 8 foreach (c in string)              0       10.3   10.3    0.11     

Code Used (tested separately; shown together for brevity)

//1 index accessor
int strLength = longString.Length;
for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++) { c = longString[i]; }

//2 explicit convert ToCharArray
int strLength = longString.Length;
char[] charArray = longString.ToCharArray();
for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++) { c = charArray[i]; }

//3 for(c in string.ToCharArray)
foreach (char c in longString.ToCharArray()) { } 

//4 use StringReader
int strLength = longString.Length;
StringReader sr = new StringReader(longString);
for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++) { c = Convert.ToChar(sr.Read()); }

//5 StreamWriter => StreamReader 
int strLength = longString.Length;
MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream);
writer.Write(longString);
writer.Flush();
stream.Position = 0;
StreamReader str = new StreamReader(stream);
while (stream.Position < strLength) { c = Convert.ToChar(str.Read()); } 

//6 GetBytes() => StreamReader
int strLength = longString.Length;
MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(longString));
StreamReader str = new StreamReader(stream);
while (stream.Position < strLength) { c = Convert.ToChar(str.Read()); }

//7 GetBytes() => BinaryReader 
int strLength = longString.Length;
MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(longString));
BinaryReader br = new BinaryReader(stream, Encoding.Unicode);
while (stream.Position < strLength) { c = br.ReadChar(); }

//8 foreach (c in string)
foreach (char c in longString) { } 

Accepted answer:

I interpreted @CodeInChaos and Ben's notes as follows:

fixed (char* pString = longString) {
    char* pChar = pString;
    for (int i = 0; i < strLength; i++) {
        c = *pChar ;
        pChar++;
    }
}

Execution for 100 iterations over the short string was 4.4 ms, with < 0.1 ms st dev.

share|improve this question
3  
ToCharArray() creates a new copy of "super long" string, so even if its performance notable, memory consumption overcome benefits it brings. –  Tigran Jan 9 '12 at 19:10
1  
Just wondering, measuring in LINQPad using System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch? –  subkamran Jan 9 '12 at 19:12
2  
What about foreach (char c in str) ? –  L.B Jan 9 '12 at 19:12
3  
Though this data is interesting trivia, I note that the vast majority of SO readers will never have to index into a 99 million char string. (If I had a 99 million char string, odds are good it would be on disk and I would be using a memory mapped file in the first place, not a string.) Would it not be more interesting to measure strings of a more realistic size? –  Eric Lippert Jan 9 '12 at 19:16
2  
If unsafe code is acceptable, you can also fix the string in memory and then use pointers. fixed(char* ps=s){...} –  CodesInChaos Jan 9 '12 at 19:17
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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The fastest answer is to use C++/CLI: How to: Access Characters in a System::String

This approach iterates through the characters in-place in the string using pointer arithmetic. There are no copies, no implicit range checks, and no per-element function calls.

It's likely possible to get (nearly, C++/CLI doesn't require pinning) the same performance from C# by writing an unsafe C# version of PtrToStringChars.

Something like:

unsafe char* PtrToStringContent(string s, out GCHandle pin)
{
    pin = GCHandle.Alloc(s, GCHandleType.Pinned);
    return (char*)pin.AddrOfPinnedObject().Add(System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.OffsetToStringData).ToPointer();
}

Do remember to call GCHandle.Free afterwards.

CodeInChaos's comment points out that C# provides a syntactic sugar for this:

fixed(char* pch = s) { ... }
share|improve this answer
1  
Any way you could post an example of how to call and PtrToStringChars from C#? I read the article you linked to as well as How to: Convert System::String to wchar_t* or char*, and I get the general idea, but I lack the C++ skills to know how to call this from C#. –  Joshua Honig Jan 9 '12 at 19:35
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Any reason not to include foreach?

foreach (char c in text)
{
    ...
}

Is this really going to be your performance bottleneck, by the way? What proportion of your total running time does the iteration itself take?

share|improve this answer
2  
It is included in method 3. As for performance: all these methods are so fast that it probably doesn't matter. But knowing is still interesting, especially when it reveals something about how the runtime or language works. –  Joshua Honig Jan 9 '12 at 19:13
2  
@jmh_gr - No it isn't. Method 3 iterates over the result of a call to ToCharArray. –  Oded Jan 9 '12 at 19:14
6  
@jmh_gr: So if all you need to do is iterate over the characters, I'd use this. It's the simplest code which expresses your intention. If that's fast enough, don't micro-optimize towards more complex code. –  Jon Skeet Jan 9 '12 at 19:24
3  
@jmh_gr: However, if you start applying the same measurements to very similar situations, you can get very different results. Using BinaryReader seems like going out of your way to start with - I always start with the simplest, most readable and testable code that works, measure that, and optimize further if necessary. –  Jon Skeet Jan 9 '12 at 19:33
2  
@one.beat.consumer: No, it's not safe to assume that - given that it wasn't in there until after I'd added my answer. It was edited in by the OP. –  Jon Skeet Jan 10 '12 at 1:22
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These kind of artificial tests are pretty dangerous. Notable is that your //2 and //3 versions of the code never actually indexes the string. The jitter optimizer just throws away the code since the c variable isn't used at all. You are just measuring how long the for() loop takes. You can't really see this unless you look at the generated machine code.

Change it to c += longString[i]; to force the array indexer to be used.

Which is nonsense of course. Profile only real code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - Thanks for pointing that out. –  one.beat.consumer Jan 9 '12 at 23:10
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If speed really matters for is faster than foreach

for (int i = 0; i < text.Length; i++) {
   char ch = text[i];
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Yes, just like his option 1. –  Oded Jan 9 '12 at 19:15
    
just like most his options –  nawfal Jan 9 '12 at 19:31
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If micro optimization is very important for you, then try this. (I assumed input string's length to be multiple of 8 for simplicity)

unsafe void LoopString()
{
    fixed (char* p = longString)
    {
        char c1,c2,c3,c4;
        Int64 len = longString.Length;
        Int64* lptr = (Int64*)p;
        Int64 l;
        for (int i = 0; i < len; i+=8)
        {
            l = *lptr;
            c1 = (char)(l & 0xffff);
            c2 = (char)(l >> 16);
            c3 = (char)(l >> 32);
            c4 = (char)(l >> 48);
            lptr++;
        }
    }
}

Just kidding, never use this code :)

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