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in C++, why my pointer to a function cannot be initialized ?

 double (*ptrF)(double&) = NULL;    

 double func(double& x)
 {
     return x*x;
 }
 ptrF= &func; 

 double aFunc(double target, double start, double tolerance, double (*ptrF)(double&) )

 void findSqrt()
{
    double myF = 2.0 ; double myStart = 1.1 ; 
    double t = aFunc(myF, myStart , ptrF); 
    cout << "myF  sqrt root is " << t << endl ; 
 }

I got error:

  error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '=' token

  error: cannot convert 'double (*)(double&)' to 'double' for argument '3' to 'double newton(double, double, double, double (*)(double&))'

thanks

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2  
Corresponding line numbers for the errors would help. Also, your error message talks about newton, which is not in your example code. –  Thomas Eding Jan 9 '12 at 19:12
3  
Why you are passing only 3 parameters to a aFunc? It needs 4 parameters. How about the implementation of aFunc? –  hsalimi Jan 9 '12 at 19:13

4 Answers 4

Code can not be run outside a function.

This is trying to run code:

ptrF= &func;

This is because it is not a declaration.
If you move this to inside a function it ill work

Alternatively you can initialize it at the declaration point.

double (*ptrF)(double&) = &func;

Insufficient parameters:

 aFunc(myF, myStart ,    ptrF);  
 //                  ^^^^   Missing a double here

Notice you are only passing three arguments. This function takes four. So you are passing a function pointer as a parameter that is only expecting a double.

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You have two separate bugs:

error: expected constructor, destructor, or type conversion before '=' token

You cannot write an assignment

ptrF= &func; 

outside of any function. Move the declaration of ptrF below the definition of func and make it an initialization instead, which you can write at file scope, as alk suggested. The & in &func is also unnecessary.

error: cannot convert 'double (*)(double&)' to 'double' for argument '3' to 'double aFunc(double, double, double, double (*)(double&))'

You are passing only three arguments to aFunc, but it wants four. Add a tolerance argument and the "cannot convert" error should go away. (I don't know why GCC doesn't give you another error message telling you that you gave the wrong number of arguments. It does for C.)

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You might try this:

double func(double& x)
{
    return x*x;
}

double (*ptrF)(double&) = func;

...

double t = aFunc(myF, myStart , 0., ptrF); 
share|improve this answer
    
This works, but I nee to call it with aFunc(double target, double start, double tolerance, double (ptrF)(double&) ) ; but when I call it in func1() by : double t = aFunc(myF, myStart , ptrF); I got error: cannot convert âdouble ()(double&)â to âdoubleâ for argument â3â to âdouble newton(double, double, double, double (*)(double&))â –  user1002288 Jan 9 '12 at 19:15
1  
@user1002288: Please see hsalimi's comment above on this issue. In case you are far in the east, you should perhaps quit for today .. ;-) –  alk Jan 9 '12 at 19:16

double aFunc(double target, double start, double tolerance, double (*ptrF)(double&) )

Were you trying to do with the above line - function declaration (or) function definition?! either way its wrong/in-complete.

And you're calling aFunc as follows:

double t = aFunc(myF, myStart , ptrF); 

One obvious thing I could see it, there is a signature mismatch between the way aFunc is declared/defined (as per the first line in this post - 4 arguments) and called (3 arguments)

There are multiple errors/issues, but to proceed further, you need to correct the above mentioned issue first!

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That's just a typo, the OP forgot the semicolon on that line. –  Zack Jan 9 '12 at 19:19
    
@Zack Ha! Its hard to assume that! Thanks for notifying. –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 9 '12 at 19:21
    
@Zack In that case, the OP should look at the argument mismatch. That will help to debug further, I guess! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 9 '12 at 19:21

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