Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got an array of objects labeled with scipy.ndimage.measurements.label called Labels. I've got other array Data containing stuff related to Labels. How can I make a third array Neighbourhoods which could serve to map the nearest label to x,y is L

Given Labels and Data, how can I use python/numpy/scipy to get Neighbourhoods?

Labels = array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]] )

Data = array([[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
              [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5],
              [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4],
              [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 3, 3],
              [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2],
              [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
              [2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1],
              [3, 3, 3, 3, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1],
              [4, 4, 4, 3, 2, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1],
              [5, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]] )

Neighbourhoods = array([[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
                        [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
                        [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 2],
                        [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 2, 2],
                        [1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 2, 2, 2],
                        [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 2, 2, 2, 2],
                        [1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2],
                        [1, 1, 1, 0, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2],
                        [1, 1, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0, 0, 0, 2],
                        [1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2]] )

Note: I'm not sure what should happen with ties, so used zeros in the above Neighbourhoods

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like you want a Voronoi diagram, although I'm not sure offhand if there is a function to compute it in Numpy/Scipy. I did a quick Google search and didn't find anything in Numpy/Scipy proper, but there are some blog posts and such. –  David Z Jan 9 '12 at 20:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As suggested by David Zaslavsky, this is the job for a voroni diagram. Here is a numpy implementation: http://blancosilva.wordpress.com/2010/12/15/image-processing-with-numpy-scipy-and-matplotlibs-in-sage/

The relevant function is scipy.ndimage.distance_transform_edt. It has a return_indices option that can be exploited to do what you need (as well as calculate the raw distances (data in your example)).

As an example:

import numpy as np
from scipy.ndimage import distance_transform_edt

labels = np.array([[0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0],
                  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 2, 2, 0],
                  [0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0]] )
i, j = distance_transform_edt(labels == 0, return_distances=False, 
                              return_indices=True) 
neighborhoods = labels[i,j]
print neighborhoods

This yields:

array([[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2]])
share|improve this answer
1  
I added the relevant portion from the article. Hope that's okay! –  Joe Kington Jan 9 '12 at 22:59
    
+1 Of course :) –  ajwood Jan 10 '12 at 0:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.