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I have a function that takes a pointer as a reference argument, but I cannot pass in &my_variable to the function. The error I am receiving is cannot convert parameter from my_class* to my_class*&, using VS2010.

Why is this not allowed?

class my_class
{
public:
    my_class();
    my_class(my_class* &parent);
};

--

int main()
{
    my_class a;
    my_class b(&a);                   // Not legal

    // ---
    my_class a;
    my_class* a_ptr = &a;
    my_class b(a);                    // Legal

    // ---
    my_class* a = new my_class;
    my_class* b = new my_class(a);    // Legal
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The result of an address-of expression is an rvalue. Therefore, you cannot bind it to reference-to-nonconst.

It also makes no sense. It's like saying int a; &a = 12; Obviously you cannot change the address of the variable a.

Instead, you want this:

int a;
int * p = &a;
mutate_me(p);    // declared as mutate_me(int * &);

If the function does not need to mutate the pointer, pass it either by const-reference or by value.

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Makes sense. Thanks! –  Eric Jan 9 '12 at 20:37

Think about situation when you write something like

void foo(bar*& ptr) {
  ptr = new bar;
}

bar b;
foo(&b);
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Informally, a method expecting a parameter by reference expects that it gets passed something that can be legally placed on the left side of an assignment statement (sometimes called an "lvalue").

int main()
{
    my_class a;
    my_class b(&a);                   // Not legal: &a = 0; would be illegal because you can't change an address of a variable.

    // ---
    my_class a;
    my_class* a_ptr = &a;
    my_class b(a_ptr);                    // Legal: You've declared a_ptr on the stack and its value (what it points to) can be changed. The address of a_ptr would not be changeable though.

    // ---
    my_class* a = new my_class;
    my_class* b = new my_class(a);    // Legal: Again, this is on the stack and `a` could point to something else, but its own address won't be changed.
}

In this case, it's worth pointing out that in most cases, passing a pointer by value is inexpensive and will work. If you really need the pointer to be modifiable (passed by reference), then you need to pass an lvalue.

Another option is to have the reference be const. Then I believe you can pass rvalues just fine.

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