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I have a couple of static methods which convert a Form to a Control (shown below). The analyzer flags both, stating, "CA2000 : Microsoft.Reliability : In method '...', object 'form' is not disposed along all exception paths. Call System.IDisposable.Dispose on object 'form' before all references to it are out of scope." Similar is flagged for tabPage.

NOTE: for those who don't have Enterprise Edition and the Analyzer menu, this looks a lot like FxCop output.

I'm not clear on what I should be doing. If new fails, an exception will be thrown. Where is my opportunity to call Dispose?

class Foo
{
  static public Form FormAsControl()
  {
    Form form = new Foo();

    form.TopLevel = false;
    form.FormBorderStyle = FormBorderStyle.None;
    form.Dock = DockStyle.Fill;
    form.Visible = true;

    return form;
  }

  static public TabPage FormAsTabPage()
  {
    Form form = Foo.FormAsControl();
    TabPage tabPage = new TabPage();

    tabPage.Text = form.Text;
    tabPage.Controls.Add(form);

    return tabPage;
  }

  ...
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

CA2000 is troublesome, too many false warnings. FxCop isn't smart enough to know how the Control class works. Its Dispose() method only does something useful after the native control window gets created. Only then will there be unmanaged resources that could be disposed. But that won't happen until the TabPage you return gets added to a TabControl and that control in turn is added to a form and the Show() method of that form is called. Code we cannot see (nor FxCop for that matter). Furthermore, they actually do get disposed, even when there's an exception, when the native window gets destroyed.

You could suppress the warning by adding try/catch to the methods so you can call Dispose() in the catch block. But that would be a mistake, it just adds unnecessary code that doesn't do anything useful at runtime. Use the [SuppressMessage] attribute to get rid of the warning.

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"[SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Reliability", "CA2000")]" worked like a charm. Thank you very much. –  jww Jan 10 '12 at 18:34

Based on your code, you should be able to safely ignore that warning.

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Based on your code, not only should you ignore the warning, but you must ignore the warning.

A naive implementation might be

public Control FormAsControl()
{
    using (Form form = new Foo())
    {
        // Set properties
        return form;
    }
}

but then form will have been disposed before the caller can use it!

Note that I'm assuming you meant class Foo to derive from Form, and that you meant FormAsControl to return Control, not Form.

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Agreed. Thanks John. –  jww Jan 10 '12 at 18:40

We can learn something from C++'s RAII techniques here:

class auto_disposer<C> : IDisposable where C : class
{
    public C Child { get; private set; }
    public auto_disposer(C c) { Child = c; }

    public void Dispose() { IDisposable d =  Child as IDisposable; if (d != null) d.Dispose(); }
    public C Release() { C retval = Child; Child = null; return retval; }
}

class Foo
{
     static public Form FormAsControl()
     {
         using (var ad = new auto_disposer<Foo>(new Foo())) {
             Form form = ad.Child;
             form.TopLevel = false;
             form.FormBorderStyle = FormBorderStyle.None;
             form.Dock = DockStyle.Fill;
             form.Visible = true;

             return ad.Release();
         }
     }

     // ...
}

This way, if any property assignments cause an exception, the object is still properly disposed.

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Catch the exception, call Dispose, throw?

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