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I have two arrays:

@array1 = (A,B,C,D,E,F);
@array2 = (A,C,H,D,E,G);

The arrays could be of different size. I want to find how many mismatches are there between the arrays. The indexes should be the same. In this case there are three mismatch :b->c,c->h and F->G.(i.e , The 'C' in $array[2] should not be considered a match to 'C' in $array[1]) I would like to get the number of mismatches as well as the mismatch.

foreach my $a1 ( 0 .. $#array1) {
 foreach my $a2( 0 .. $#array2)
  if($array1[$a1] ne $array2[$a2]) {

   }
 }
}

my %array_one = map {$_, 1} @array1;
my @difference = grep {!$array_one {$_}} @array1;

print "@difference\n";

Ans: gives me H, G but not C.

with my little Perl knowledge I tried this, with no result. Could you suggest me how I should deal this? Your suggestions and pointers would be very helpful.

share|improve this question
    
Don't you want to use the same index for each one? –  Paul Tomblin Jan 9 '12 at 21:09
    
Sorry , I am not understanding your question. –  Sipra Moon Jan 9 '12 at 21:16
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's an example using each_arrayref from List::MoreUtils.

sub diff_array{
  use List::MoreUtils qw'each_arrayref';
  return unless @_ && defined wantarray;
  my @out;

  my $iter = each_arrayref(@_);

  my $index = 0;
  while( my @current = $iter->() ){
    next if all_same(@current);

    unshift @current, $index;
    push @out, \@current;
  }continue{ ++$index }

  return @out;
}

This version should be faster if you are going to use this for determining the number of differences often. The output is exactly the same. It just doesn't have to work as hard when returning a number.
Read about wantarray for more information.

sub diff_array{
  use List::MoreUtils qw'each_arrayref';
  return unless @_ && defined wantarray;

  my $iter = each_arrayref(@_);

  if( wantarray ){
    # return structure
    my @out;

    my $index = 0;
    while( my @current = $iter->() ){
      next if all_same(@current);

      unshift @current, $index;
      push @out, \@current;
    }continue{ ++$index }

    return @out;

  }else{
    # only return a count of differences
    my $out = 0;
    while( my @current = $iter->() ){
      ++$out unless all_same @current;
    }
    return $out;
  }
}

diff_array uses the subroutine all_same to determine if all of the current list of elements are the same.

sub all_same{
  my $head = shift;
  return undef unless @_; # not enough arguments
  for( @_ ){
    return 0 if $_ ne $head; # at least one mismatch
  }
  return 1; # all are the same
}

To get just the number of differences:

print scalar diff_array \@array1, \@array2;
my $count  = diff_array \@array1, \@array2;

To get a list of differences:

my @list = diff_array \@array1, \@array2;

To get both:

my $count = my @list = diff_array \@array1, \@array2;

The output for the input you provided:

(
  [ 1, 'B', 'C' ],
  [ 2, 'C', 'H' ],
  [ 5, 'F', 'G' ]
)

Example usage

my @a1 = qw'A B C D E F';
my @a2 = qw'A C H D E G';

my $count = my @list = diff_array \@a1, \@a2;

print "There were $count differences\n\n";

for my $group (@list){
  my $index = shift @$group;
  print "  At index $index\n";
  print "    $_\n" for @$group;
  print "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Thanks every one. I used Array::Each module to get the same index compared. And it worked fine too. Thanks every one for their time. I have learnt many other new ways too. –  Sipra Moon Jan 10 '12 at 13:42
    
@SipraMoon Array::Each is going to be noticeably slower than each_arrayref (assuming that that the XS has been compiled). –  Brad Gilbert Jan 10 '12 at 14:04
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You shouldn't have nested loops. You only need to go through the indexes once.

use List::Util qw( max );

my @mismatches;
for my $i (0..max($#array1, $#array2)) {
   push @mismatches, $i
      if $i >= @array1
      || $i >= @array2
      || $array1[$i] ne $array2[$i];
   }
}

say "There are " . (0+@mismatches) . " mismatches";
for my $i (@mismatches) {
   ...
}

Since you mentioned grep, this is how you'd replace the for with grep:

use List::Util qw( max );

my @mismatches =
    grep {  $_ >= @array1
         || $_ >= @array2
         || array1[$_] ne $array2[$_] }
    0 .. max($#array1, $#array2);

say "There are " . (0+@mismatches) . " mismatches";
for my $i (@mismatches) {
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Sipra Moon, I missed that you want the actual mismatch. Fixed. –  ikegami Jan 10 '12 at 0:16
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You're iterating over both arrays when you don't want to be doing so.

@array1 = ("A","B","C","D","E","F");
@array2 = ("A","C","H","D","E","G");
foreach my $index (0 .. $#array1) {
   if ($array1[$index] ne $array2[$index]) {
       print "Arrays differ at index $index: $array1[$index] and $array2[$index]\n";
   }
}

Output:

Arrays differ at index 1: B and C
Arrays differ at index 2: C and H
Arrays differ at index 5: F and G
share|improve this answer
    
OP specified arrays can be different sizes. You're just ignoring the case where array2 is longer than array1. –  derobert Jan 9 '12 at 21:31
    
That's true, and I was going to add that as a caveat. –  Kirsten Jones Jan 9 '12 at 21:37
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Well, first, you're going to want to go over each element of one of the arrays, and compare it to the same element of the other array. List::MoreUtils provides an easy way to do this:

use v5.14;
use List::MoreUtils qw(each_array);

my @a = qw(a b c d);
my @b = qw(1 2 3);

my $ea = each_array @a, @b;
while ( my ($a, $b) = $ea->() ) {
    say "a = $a, b = $b, idx = ", $ea->('index');
}

You can extend that to find where there is a non-match by checking inside that while loop (note: this assumes your arrays don't have undefs at the end, or that if they do, undef is the same as having a shorter array):

my @mismatch;
my $ea = each_array @a, @b;
while ( my ($a, $b) = $ea->() ) {
    if (defined $a != defined $b || $a ne $b) {
        push @mismatch, $ea->('index');
    }
}

and then:

say "Mismatched count = ", scalar(@mismatch), " items are: ", join(q{, }, @mismatch);
share|improve this answer
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The following code builds a list of mismatched pairs, then prints them out.

@a1 = (A,B,C,D,E,F);
@a2 = (A,C,H,D,E,G);
@diff = map { [$a1[$_] => $a2[$_]] }
            grep { $a1[$_] ne $a2[$_] }
                 (0..($#a1 < $#a2 ? $#a1 : $#a2));
print "$_->[0]->$_->[1]\n" for @diff
share|improve this answer
    
That won't work so well if the arrays are a different length, and some of the elements are equal to undef (e.g., empty string). Or if a2 is longer than a2 (undef-equivalent or not). OP specified different lengths. –  derobert Jan 9 '12 at 21:27
    
@derobert: I've amended my answer for the length issue. I don't understand your point about undef, though; the OP didn't indicate such a possibility and the original code worked fine if I set one of the list elements to the empty string. Of course, you can't do this in the list assignment, but I didn't consider that part of the problem proper. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 9 '12 at 22:10
    
First, I've fixed a typo in your ternary operator. Second, the undef issue is consider the arrays @a1 = ('a', undef, 'c'); @a2 = ('a', '', 'c', ''). Your code says there are no mismatches; but I think someone would expect there to be two mismatches. Perl considers '' eq undef to be true. The undef in the middle might be understandable (that is how eq is defined, after all), but the extra empty-string element going unnoticed is quite surprising to a user of your code, I think. –  derobert Jan 9 '12 at 22:17
    
@derobert: Thanks for correcting the silly typo. As for the point about undefs, I get it, but that's just a quirk of ne. It's hardly up to me to say whether undef and ''should be considered a match, especially since Perl itself says they are. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 10 '12 at 8:13
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You have the right idea, but you only need a single loop, since you are looking at each index and comparing entries between the arrays:

foreach my $a1 ( 0 .. $#array1) {
  if($array1[$a1] ne $array2[$a1]) {
     print "$a1: $array1[$a1] <-> $array2[$a1]\n";
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
OP specified arrays can be different sizes. You're just ignoring the case where array2 is longer than array1. –  derobert Jan 9 '12 at 21:30
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