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High resolution timer with C++ and Linux?

double hires_time_in_seconds();

I'm looking for this function for Windows, Linux too if you have it. It is mentioned in http://gafferongames.com/game-physics/fix-your-timestep/. I've looked on the web. I know it's not a standard function but if anybody has an implementation that they want to share, that would be great.

Failing that, I need something as fine grained as possible to do synchronization in a client server game.

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marked as duplicate by Greg Hewgill, Georg Fritzsche, Jonathan Grynspan, Brian Roach, Drew Dormann Jan 9 '12 at 21:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Have you looked at Boost.DateTime..? It provides microsecond or nanosecond resolution, depending on how you build. (Also, how is a timer with seconds-level granularity "hires"?) –  ildjarn Jan 9 '12 at 21:20
    
You should refer to stackoverflow.com/questions/275004/…. –  volodymyr Jan 9 '12 at 21:22
    
C++ has std::chrono::high_resolution_clock now. It hasn't been implemented in VS as of VS2010, but GCC on linux should have it. –  bames53 Jan 9 '12 at 21:28
    
@bames53 : Good point, and for older platforms there is now Boost.Chrono. –  ildjarn Jan 9 '12 at 21:29
    
Rather than Boost I'll probably use the Windows and Unix specific versions mentioned in the duplicates. Cheers. –  ScrollerBlaster Jan 9 '12 at 21:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's not a real function, it's just a self-descriptive placeholder name used in that blog post's example code.

For Windows, you'll want to use QueryPerformanceCounter along with QueryPerformanceFrequency. For Unix-based OSes, you'll want to use gettimeofday(3).

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That great thanks –  ScrollerBlaster Jan 9 '12 at 21:32

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