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I am doing some sql caching of certain queries. I'm using CakePHP so the query conditions are in an array thus:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'Tutorial.id IN ( SELECT tutorial_id FROM classifications WHERE classifications.product_id = 1 ) ',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    'Tutorial.status_id ' => 
    array (
      0 => 4,
      1 => 7,
    ),
  ),
  'OR' => 
  array (
    'Tutorial.user_id' => '40',
  ),
);

I'm mostly looking for the product_id, but there are some other possible conditions, so I wanted to reduce the array to a checksum and append it to the name of the cache file. This way I'd have tutorials_by_classification-413a86af or something, and I wouldn't have to pick thru the array.

I've seen the function to implode mutli-d arrays on php.net in the comments, but I'm wondering if there's a simpler way to achieve my goal.

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2 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

How about serialize and md5? serialize creates a string representation of your array; md5 creates a hash of it.

Example:

$query = array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'Tutorial.id IN ( SELECT tutorial_id FROM classifications WHERE classifications.product_id = 1 ) ',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    'Tutorial.status_id ' => 
    array (
      0 => 4,
      1 => 7,
    ),
  ),
  'OR' => 
  array (
    'Tutorial.user_id' => '40',
  ),
);

$query_string = serialize($query);
$hash = md5($query_string);

echo $query_string, "\n\n\n", $hash, "\n";

/*
a:3:{i:0;a:1:{i:0;s:96:"Tutorial.id IN ( SELECT tutorial_id FROM classifications WHERE classifications.product_id = 1 ) ";}i:1;a:1:{s:19:"Tutorial.status_id ";a:2:{i:0;i:4;i:1;i:7;}}s:2:"OR";a:1:{s:16:"Tutorial.user_id";s:2:"40";}}


a5cb59f0ee259961e426c7ce9b7b8f32
*/
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Thanks, just what I needed! I ended up using crc32 for hashes because it keeps the file names shorter codepad.org/LhTotSth . –  sequoia mcdowell Jan 10 '12 at 14:54
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I would just do this:

$checksum = md5(json_encode($array));

json_encode is slightly faster than serialize, but you lose some of the benefits of serialize. However, for what you're doing, that doesn't matter.

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"json_encode is slightly faster than serialize". According to my benchmarks, it's not – it's about 30% slower. (But they're both pretty quick, so that probably isn't a concern.) –  lonesomeday Jan 9 '12 at 22:40
    
According to this: bugs.php.net/bug.php?id=51267 I guess it depends on whether or not your array is nested. –  Tim Gautier Jan 9 '12 at 23:25
    
Either my array was too simple to show this, or the bug has been fixed... –  lonesomeday Jan 10 '12 at 0:06
    
Thank you! It looks like this works as well, and frankly I don't have a clear picture of which one is faster (seems like micro-optimization given the size of the array in question), so I'll flip a coin. :) –  sequoia mcdowell Jan 10 '12 at 14:56
    
I have done some benchmark and got interesting results: 1 000 000 repeats serialize: 1.68s - 1.73s json: 1.70s - 1.77s (so it is slower) md5+serialize: 2.69s - 2.92s md5+json: 2.52s - 2.53s (so it is faster) –  Posuk13 Oct 15 '12 at 22:58
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