Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a web scraping program. From the main form, you can select a website and a client and click Go, and it will start a BackgroundWorker thread that utilizes WebRequest and HTMLAgilityPack to process a series of requests for SiteX and ClientX, with each request being multiple pages. Each BackgroundWorker thread has validations that run, and if it encounters a problem it will throw up a dialog box for the user to abort the thread, abort the request, ignore the error, or (if run from the IDE) step into the code. I want this dialog box to contain a WebBrowser control to display the offending HTML page nicely rendered. However, because it is being called from a BackgroundWorker thread, I get the exception "the current thread is not in a single-threaded apartment".

Here is the function that creates the dialog:

protected bool ValidatePage( bool pagePasses, string msg ) {
  if ( pagePasses == false ) {
    AbortIgnoreSuspend ais = new AbortIgnoreSuspend( responsehtml, msg );
    ais.ShowDialog();
    switch ( ais.DialogResult ) {
      case DialogResult.Abort: // Aborts entire thread
        Abort = true;
        worker.CancelAsync();
        return false;
      case DialogResult.Cancel: // Aborts this case
        Abort = true;
        return false;
      case DialogResult.Ignore: // Ignore and continue
        return true;
      case DialogResult.Retry:  // Debug
        Debug.Assert( false, "Suspending Thread" );
        return true; // Will return you to calling thread and allow you to continue
      default:
        return true;
    }
  }
  return true;
}

I have found examples where starting a Thread() with ApartmentState set to ApartmentState.STA would be able to create my WebBrowser, so I made the following code adjustment:

protected bool ValidatePage( bool pagePasses, string msg ) {
  if ( pagePasses == false ) {
    bool setAbort = false;
    bool assertError = false;
    bool cancelWorker = false;
    bool returnContinue = true;

    Thread th = new Thread( () => {
      AbortIgnoreSuspend ais = new AbortIgnoreSuspend( responsehtml, msg );
      ais.ShowDialog();
      switch ( ais.DialogResult ) {
        case DialogResult.Abort: // Aborts entire thread
          setAbort = true;
          cancelWorker = true;
          returnContinue = false;
          break;
        case DialogResult.Cancel: // Aborts this case
          setAbort = true;
          returnContinue = false;
          break;
        case DialogResult.Ignore: // Ignore and continue
          returnContinue = true;
          break;
        case DialogResult.Retry:  // Debug
          assertError = true;
          returnContinue = true; // Will return you to calling thread and allow you to continue
          break;
        default:
          returnContinue = true;
          break;
      }

    } );
    th.SetApartmentState( ApartmentState.STA );
    th.Start();
    th.Join();

    Abort = setAbort;
    Debug.Assert( !assertError, "Suspending thread for debugging" );
    if ( cancelWorker ) { worker.CancelAsync(); }
    return returnContinue;
  }
  return true;
}

This APPEARS to work (I have tested with a single BackgroundWorker), however I am pretty sure that due to my lack of experience working with Threads I have made some mistakes in the thread-safeness. What I have I done wrong, what have I missed?

share|improve this question
1  
It's okay threading-wise. An STA must also pump a message loop, you get one for free from ShowDialog(). Biggest problem you'll have is that the dialog will sometimes disappear behind another window, unseen by the user. Or the user closing the dialog by accident since she didn't expect one to pop up. –  Hans Passant Jan 9 '12 at 23:23
add comment

1 Answer

Depending on how you create threads in .NET, .NET will set that thread's apartment to a beast called MTA or STA. Both MTA and STA are COM technologies; other than that they have little use in .NET (as mentioned in MS's .NET documentation). MS likes to default certain .NET threads to MTA if you don't explicitly set it, I suspect your thread is not the primary UI STA thread.

I see you are using the rather nifty BackgroundWorker in .NET. If you set WorkerReportsProgress to true, set a handler for ProgressChanged and move your dialog code to be called inside this new handler should fix your problem.

ProgressChanged does not really have to actually report progress, you can use it for anything, particularly when you need to thread-context-switch. The argument you pass to ReportProgress can be any object you like too.

Why does this work? ProgressChanged automatically performs thread marshalling from the context of the worker thread to that of the primary user interface (UI) thread. Only in the UI thread can you perform UI calls safely.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.