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Here's my code for Codecamedy's FizzBuzz lesson

var i;
for ( i = 1; i > 20; i++ ) {
  "hello"
  if ( i % 3 === 0 ) {
    if ( i % 5 === 0 ) {
      "FizzBuzz";
    }
    else {
      "Fizz";
    }
  }
  else if ( i % 5 === 0 ) {
    "Buzz";
  }
 else {
    i;
  }
}

I'm trying to first test whether or not the number (i) is divisible by 3. If it is, I then want to check whether it is also divisible by 5. If both conditions are true, I want it to say "FizzBuzz". If only the first condition is true, it should say "Fizz". Then, after determining that i is not divisible by 3, it should check whether i is divisible by 5 and show "Buzz" if that's the case. Failing all divisibility, it should just show the number.

As I expected... it doesn't work as expected. What terribly embarrassing mistakes have I made?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

After considering all the other very good answers here:

Since you're "stuck on step 1" with the code you've provided, I assume you did the same mistake I did after clicking your link and reading the instructions. Step 1 doesn't actually ask you to solve the Fizzbuzz problem. To pass this step, you only have to do something much simpler. Read the (not very good) instructions again ;)

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Ah ha! The other answers are indeed good, and were very helpful. But you're right. I was getting way ahead of myself here. Those instructions should be restated. I stripped out all the fizzbuzz stuff and passed this step with flying colors. Thanks. Onwards! –  mrdavidjcole Jan 10 '12 at 2:57

First, your loop is not even getting off the ground:

for ( i = 1; i > 20; i++ )

will not iterate even once since the middle condition is initially false. I think you meant:

for ( i = 1; i <= 20; i++ )

"FizzBuzz";

is just a string literal that JavaScript is ignoring. You need to output this string somehow:

console.log("FizzBuzz");

Also, this block

else {
    i;
  }

is also not doing anything. Did you want to display numbers that were divisible by neither 3 nor 5?

else {
    console.log(i);
  }

And, on a similar note, what is the "hello" at the top loop supposed to do?


On a more positive note, I see you're using strict equality:

if ( i % 5 === 0 )

this is a very, very good habit to be in. The non-strict equality operator == will do all sorts of implicit conversions if you're not careful. Always use strict equality unless you purposefully want these implicit conversions to happen.

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Also be sure not to log the "hello" string at the top –  fivedigit Jan 10 '12 at 2:30
    
@fivedigit - indeed. I added a note about that. Maybe that was supposed to be a debug statement just make sure the program was alive? –  Adam Rackis Jan 10 '12 at 2:32
    
Thank you Adam. Awesome advice here. Turns out I was doing way too much for the first step of the lesson - see the comment by Andreas below. –  mrdavidjcole Jan 10 '12 at 2:58
    
@mrdavidjcole - sure thing. Well when you get to the next few steps, hopefully the above will be useful :) –  Adam Rackis Jan 10 '12 at 3:00
    
I just completed the rest of the lessons, and your comments were helpful indeed. Gracias senor. –  mrdavidjcole Jan 10 '12 at 3:15

Your specific problems are that you have the wrong sense for the for loop and that a statement like "somestring" or i doesn't actually do anything. What you want to do is output it do the console (or other output stream of some sort) - how to do this depends on the environment your Javascript is running in, and where you want the information to go.

You can also keep in mind that any number evenly divisible by both three and five is a multiple of 15.

So you can simplify your code with something like:

for all numbers in range:
    if num is a multiple of 15:
        print "FizzBuzz"
        continue for loop

    if num is a multiple of 3:
        print "Fizz"
        continue for loop

    if num is a multiple of 5:
        print "Buzz"
        continue for loop

    print i

There are those that will complain about multiple exit or restart points in a loop but you can safely ignore them since they don't understand the reasons behind that guideline, to avoid spaghetti code.

Any code where you can see all the control flow on a single page (such as the eleven lines above) is incapable of being spaghetti code, especially given the consistent handling.


Here's the equivalent Javascript code, packaged into a web page for testing:

<html><head></head><body><script type="text/javascript">
    var i;
    for (i = 1; i <= 20; i++) {
        if (i % 15 === 0) {
            document.write ("FizzBuzz<br>");
            continue;
        };  

        if (i % 3 === 0) {
            document.write ("Fizz<br>");
            continue;
        };  

        if (i % 5 === 0) {
            document.write ("Buzz<br>");
            continue;
        };  

        document.write (i + "<br>");
    }   
</script></body></html>

which outputs, as desired:

1
2
Fizz
4
Buzz
Fizz
7
8
Fizz
Buzz
11
Fizz
13
14
FizzBuzz
16
17
Fizz
19
Buzz
share|improve this answer
for (var i = 1; i <= 20; i++) {
    if (i % 15 === 0) {
        console.log("FizzBuzz");
    }
    else if (i % 3 === 0) {
        console.log("Fizz");
    }
     else if (i % 5 === 0) {
        console.log("Buzz");
    }
    else{
    console.log(i);
    };
} 
share|improve this answer

for ( i = 1; i > 20; i++ ) means that the program will do nothing. If you expect the variable i to begin with 1 and end with 20, you should do that like for( i = 1; i <= 20; i++). And if you want to test some number you want, you should use the function like:

function TestFizzBuzz(num){
    ...
    ...
}
TestFizzBuzz(1);
TestFizzBuzz(990);
...
share|improve this answer

What if we make things a bit more difficult? 1) No division or modulo operations allowed; 2) The loop must skip all unnecessary iterations. Here is the answer:

int n3 = 3;
int n5 = 5;
int i = 3;
while (i <= 100)
{
    Console.Write(i.ToString() + " - ");

    if (i == n3)
    {
        Console.Write("fizz");

        n3 = n3 + 3;
    }

    if (i == n5)
    {
        Console.Write("buzz");

        n5 = n5 + 5;
    }

    Console.WriteLine();

    i = n3 < n5 ? n3 : n5;
}
share|improve this answer
    
dividable by 5 can be even easier. Just check if it ends on 5 or 0. To check dividable by 3 you can add up each individual number until you end up at 0, 3, 6 or 9. aaamath.com/div66_x3.htm –  jessehouwing 2 days ago
    
Yes, you are correct, these hacks will definitely speed up the code. But my solution is generic, it will work fine with any given pair of numbers. –  mik61 yesterday

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