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just playing with pointers, trying to pass the address of a pointer to a function

using:

void changer(int **ptr)
{
    if(**ptr==NULL)
    {   
        *ptr=(int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
        **ptr=2;
    }

}

int main()
{
    int *ptr;
    clrscr();
    changer(&ptr);
    printf("%d",*ptr);
    getch();
    return 0;
}

Tough the program complies, the results are not as expected!!

share|improve this question
2  
the results are not as expected!! What did you expect? Please provide more info – Krishnabhadra Jan 10 '12 at 5:27
1  
What is the intended behavior? What is it actually doing? There are several bugs in your code, but without knowing what you wanted to do I'm not sure how to help. – templatetypedef Jan 10 '12 at 5:28
    
What in the world is the clrscr() function? And what results are you getting? How do those compare to the results that you were expecting? – Cody Gray Jan 10 '12 at 5:28
    
getting the output as -21743, clrscr() is used to clear the console (windows) – Akash Jan 10 '12 at 5:30
    
Never typecast the result of malloc in C. Read the C FAQ. – Lundin Jan 10 '12 at 10:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have an extra dereference of ptr in the NULL check, and you are not initializing the pointer. The program should look like this after the fix:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void changer(int **ptr)
{
    if(*ptr==NULL) // Dereference once, not twice
    {
        *ptr=(int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
        **ptr=2;
    }
}

int main()
{
    int *ptr = 0; // Initialize the pointer
    clrscr();
    changer(&ptr);
    printf("%d",*ptr);
    getch();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
go it, thanks for your help – Akash Jan 10 '12 at 5:32

It crashes because you meant on line 3:

if (*ptr == NULL)

rather than

if (**ptr == NULL)

You will also want to initialize the pointer to NULL on line 13, since you are checking against that with the above:

int *ptr = NULL;

In C, variables are not automatically initialized to zero, unless allocated at static scope, which has other consequences depending on the context.

share|improve this answer

You haven't initialized ptr in main(), but you check whether what it points to is zero in changer().

Use:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void changer(int **ptr)
{
    if (*ptr == NULL)
    {
        *ptr = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
        if (*ptr != NULL)
           **ptr = 2;
    }
}

int main(void)
{
    int *ptr = NULL;
    changer(&ptr);
    printf("%d\n", *ptr);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Like another said, you have an extra *.

I think you can use the fact, that var declaring in c are made from a type, and a expression.

For example, the declare int **ptr (if your function), say that the expression **ptr is from the type int, so in the check **ptr == NULL, you compare int to a pointer. It's legal, but when you find yourself doing something like this, you may want to rethink about what you do. (and a good compiler may give you a warning)

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