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I have this class:

class user
{
private:
    string userid;
    string password;
public:
    user(){};
    user(string a, string b){userid = a; password = b;}
    ~user(){cout<<"Trace";};
    void    print ( ostream& out );
};

Every time I try to append to my queue this way aqueue.append(user(userid, password); it will append to my queue but it will call the destructor afterwards. The queue is a basic generic linked list pointing to the next cell. My question is: how to add to a class to a queue with out calling the destructor each time?

share|improve this question
    
Assuming your queue works like std::queue, you can't. You copy the object into the queue, and the original is destroyed. It seems that's the same approach you've taken with your queue. – Billy ONeal Jan 10 '12 at 5:37
    
@BillyONeal can I get around this with pointers? – Joe Tyman Jan 10 '12 at 5:38
    
@Joe: Yes; but the extra memory allocations are going to cost far more than a few destructor calls. (Honestly, a linked list is a horrible data structure in most every case; you'd be better off using something like the way std::deque, or a circular buffer) – Billy ONeal Jan 10 '12 at 5:39
1  
What's wrong with the destructor being called? – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 10 '12 at 6:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Store pointers (e.g. raw pointers, std::auto_ptr, std::unique_ptr) to the objects you wish to store, rather than the objects themselves.

share|improve this answer

It is looks like you are creating object in stack & passing it to queue for append. And as queue is accepting object (not pointer or reference) it may deep copy object & as scope of original object get finish it will get removed(destructed).

create object using new operator on heap & then pass it using reference or pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
How do I do that? – Joe Tyman Jan 10 '12 at 5:43
    
Queue is your own class or STL? – Divyang Mithaiwala Jan 10 '12 at 6:00

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