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I have a list containing 305899 Strings (which is the username for a website). After I remove all the duplicates, the number goes down to 172123 Strings.

I want to find how many times a particular String (the username) is repeated in that ArrayList. I wrote a simple bubble sort type logic but it was too slow.

private static Map<String, Integer> findNumberOfPosts(List<String> userNameList) {
    Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
    int duplicate = 0;
    int size = userNameList.size();
    for (int i = 0; i < size - 1; i++) {
        duplicate = 0;
        for (int j = i + 1; j < size; j++) {
            if (userNameList.get(i).equals(userNameList.get(j))) {
                duplicate++;
                userNameList.remove(j);
                j--;
                size--;

            }
        }
        numberOfPosts.put(userNameList.get(i), duplicate);
    }

    return numberOfPosts;
}

Then I changed it to this:

private static Map<String, Integer> findNumberOfPosts(List<String> userNameList) {
    Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

    Set<String> unique = new HashSet<String>(userNameList);

    for (String key : unique) {
        numberOfPosts.put(key, Collections.frequency(userNameList, key));
    }

    return numberOfPosts;
}

This was really slow as well. When I mean slow, it would take like 30+ minutes to through the list.

Is there any other efficient way to handle this problem? Just reduce the time it takes to find and count duplicate elements?

share|improve this question
    
Can a two have the same username, why duplicates?? – Noor Jan 10 '12 at 5:46
    
"I wrote a simple bubble sort type logic but it was too slow." - yeah, that's the problem with Bubble Sort: it's pathelogical O(N^2) will get you every time. – Mitch Wheat Jan 10 '12 at 5:48
1  
I suggest that you keep this in a database table and get the COUNT on username which will be much more faster and easier. – James Jithin Jan 10 '12 at 5:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your findNumberOfPosts method is on the right track, but your implementation is doing loads of unnecessary work.
Try this:

private static Map<String, Integer> findNumberOfPosts(List<String> userNameList) {
    Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

    for (String userName : userNameList) {
        Integer count = numberOfPosts.get(userName);
        numberOfPosts.put(userName, count == null ? 1 : ++count);
    }
    return numberOfPosts;
}

This should execute in a couple of seconds on most machines.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. but Isn't he better off using a Multiset? – Pangea Jan 10 '12 at 6:06
    
awesome! It works much much faster now. But I have naive question. For instance there are 3 "foo"s in my list. Now what I don't understand is, numberOfPosts should have 3 "foo"s with (foo, 1), (foo, 2) and (foo,3) right? since HashMap allows duplicate entries. Your logic works just great, but I dont understand why is there only 1 entry for 3 "foo"s? Thanks a lot for your time! – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:08
1  
@javaCity HashMap does not allow duplicate entries. When you put the new count, it replaces the old one. – Ted Hopp Jan 10 '12 at 6:10
    
@TedHopp Oh yes, you are right. I was thinking its an ArrayList haha. Thank you for your reply. – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:13
1  
@Bohemian I think there is a mistake in your program though. Instead of count++ it should be ++count; in this line numberOfPosts.put(userName, count == null ? 1 : count++); – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 7:42

See if this variation of your second method works faster:

private static Map<String, Integer> findNumberOfPosts(
        List<String> userNameList) {
    Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

    for (String name : userNameList) {
        Integer count = numberOfPosts.get(name);
        numberOfPosts.put(name, count == null ? 1 : (1 + count));
    }

    return numberOfPosts;
}

It has some boxing/unboxing overhead, but should operate a lot faster than what you were doing, which required iterating over the entire list of names for each unique name.

share|improve this answer

You could attempt to build a Trie structure out of the usernames. Then it would be trivial to find the number of distinct elements(username). The code for Trie is little bit complicated, so you better look up resources to see how the implementation can be done.

On other thought, considering the practical scenario, you should not have this duplicate list in the first place. I mean, if the system providing the username was properly designed, then duplicates wouldn't exist in the first place.

share|improve this answer
1  
Well in that case, I did not give much scenario. I have a text file with user posted text and their usernames. So I want to find out exactly how many times a user has posted through that file. Also, I will take a look at the Trie structure. Thanks :) – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 5:55
    
@javaCity: Not sure if you have access to the system that's generating the file, if you do, why not just updating the count as soon as a new post is made. And if you don't have control over generating the file and assuming that it will augment with time, you could maintain different counting strategy to detect out new posts, say by remembering the line you processed last and continuing from there on. – Shamim Hafiz Jan 10 '12 at 6:01
1  
Thanks. I do not have access the system. I think I have found the solution which is much much faster than what I was doing earlier. Thanks for you help! – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:05

This goes even faster than Bohemian's:

private static Map<String, Integer> findNumberOfPosts(List<String> userNameList) {

        Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();

        for (String userName : userNameList) {
            if (!numberOfPosts.containsKey(userName)) {
                numberOfPosts.put(userName, Collections.frequency(userNameList, userName));
            }
        }

        return numberOfPosts;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I am sorry but after comparing and testing your code against Bohemian's, his code runs quite a bit faster than yours. But I appreciate your effort. Thanks! – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:25
    
You're right - I should have said "for certain data sets" :-) – millhouse Jan 10 '12 at 22:18

The best solution is to add all the elements to an Array and then sort that array.

Then you can just iterate over the array and the duplicates will be placed next to each other in the array.

share|improve this answer

You should try improving the first implementation: for each entry you're iterating through the entire list. How about something like:

Map<String, Integer> map;
for (String username : usernames) {
    if (!map.containsKey(username)) {
        map.put(username, new Integer(0));
    } else {
        map.put(username, new Integer(map.get(username).intValue() + 1));
    }
}
return map;
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite... test it and see what happens – Bohemian Jan 10 '12 at 5:56
    
yea, I just saw my mistake – personak Jan 10 '12 at 5:57
    
I think you meant to do map.put. – Bhesh Gurung Jan 10 '12 at 5:57

Use the data structure that was designed to support this natively. Store the user names in a Multiset and let it automatically maintain the frequency/count for you.

Read this tutorial to understand how multiset works/

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, will do. – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:16

The following is the best and convenient method to remove duplicates and count the number of duplicate elements in a List. No need to have extra logic.

List<String> userNameList = new ArrayList<String>();
// add elements to userNameList, including duplicates

userNameList.add("a");
userNameList.add("a");
userNameList.add("a");
userNameList.add("a");

userNameList.add("b");
userNameList.add("b");
userNameList.add("b");
userNameList.add("b");

userNameList.add("c");
userNameList.add("c");
userNameList.add("c");
userNameList.add("c");

int originalSize=userNameList.size();

HashSet hs = new HashSet();   //Set would handle the duplicates automatically.
hs.addAll(userNameList);
userNameList.clear();
userNameList.addAll(hs);

Collections.sort(userNameList);  //Sort the List, if needed.

//Displays elements after removing duplicate entries.
for(Object element:userNameList)
{
    System.out.println(element);
}

int duplicate=originalSize-userNameList.size();

System.out.println("Duplicate entries in the List:->"+duplicate); //Number of duplicate entries.

 /*Map<String, Integer> numberOfPosts = new HashMap<String, Integer>();   //Store duplicate entries in your Map using some key.
 numberOfPosts.put(userNameList.get(i), duplicate);

 return(numberOfPosts);*/
share|improve this answer
    
that is true. But I don't want to remove duplicate entries. I just want to count the number of times a particular Object is repeated. This question has already been solved, but thank you for the effort. – javaCity Jan 10 '12 at 6:38

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