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Is it safe and correct to use an std::tr1::shared_ptr as in the sample code below, for the purpose of reference counting? (this is just a particular sample, the class can contain anything else (void*) instead of the FILE*)

class File
{
public:
    File(const char* path, const char* mode) :
        _refcount(new int(0))
    {
        this->_file = fopen(path, mode);
    }

    ~File()
    {
        if (this->_refcount.unique())
        {
            if (this->_file != NULL)
            {
                fclose(this->_file);
            }
        }
    }

    int write(void* buff, size_t size)
    {
        fwrite(buff, size, 1, this->_file);
    }

private:
    FILE* _file;
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<int> _refcount;
};
share|improve this question
1  
Safe in what sense? Memory safe? Thread safe? –  KennyTM Jan 10 '12 at 7:09
    
@KennyTM Yes, memory safe and thread safe, and from any other points of view. (I suppose that it is not thread safe, maybe you can explain how it can be fixed) –  bosonix Jan 10 '12 at 7:17
    
I didn't say it isn't thread-safe ;) But I'd write this like James's solution rather than an explicit ref-counter. –  KennyTM Jan 10 '12 at 7:21
1  
At first glance, I don't see any obvious data races in your example. If unique() returns true, then the only instance owning the FILE* is the one being destroyed, so there are no other instances to be copied, so there is no way for unique() to cease to be true again. Of course, performing I/O through a single FILE* from multiple threads can only end in tears. /cc @KennyTM –  James McNellis Jan 10 '12 at 7:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Consider instead using a shared_ptr<FILE> with a custom deleter:

struct fclose_deleter
{
    void operator()(FILE* f)
    {
        if (f)
        {
            std::fclose(f);
        }
    }
};

Then, your File class is much simpler (and correcter):

class File
{
public:
    File(const char* path, const char* mode)
        : _file(std::fopen(path, mode), fclose_deleter())
    {
    }

    int write(void const* buff, size_t size)
    {
        // You'll want to verify that _file.get() is valid, or you'll want to
        // throw in the constructor if the call to 'std::fopen()' fails.
        std::fwrite(buff, size, 1, _file.get());
    }

private:
    std::tr1::shared_ptr<FILE> _file;
};
share|improve this answer
    
the class can contain any data (void*), the file is just an example –  bosonix Jan 10 '12 at 7:16
3  
This technique applies to any sort of reference-counted object that requires cleanup. –  James McNellis Jan 10 '12 at 7:18
1  
This and other interesting shared_ptr techniques can be found here: boost.org/doc/libs/1_48_0/libs/smart_ptr/sp_techniques.html :) –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 10 '12 at 7:34
    
@JamesMcNellis There are two downsides to this approach: 1. everywhere in the class I will have to use _file.get(); 2. I have to create other shared_ptr, if the class has more pointer members. Can you point any advantages over my original version? –  bosonix Jan 10 '12 at 20:42
1  
Why do you have to create another shared_ptr? Create a private Context type that has all of your "shared" members. As for having to use _file.get(), if that really bothers you, add a FILE* file() const { return _file.get(); }. As for advantages, yes: it is simpler, easier to understand with respect to ownership and resource management, and much harder to screw up. –  James McNellis Jan 10 '12 at 20:54

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