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What I want is specify cursor:pointer for the whole body tag, so the background of the page is clickable, but I also want the remainder of the page to work as it did, so I try setting cursor:auto for div, which contains the page.

In FF, Chrome and safari it works fine, also in IE 6 and 7. But it seems that IE 8 and 9 and also (screw it) OPERA have their own opinion on what cursor:auto means.

Here is a snippet to see what happens:

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Cursor test</title>
    </head>
    <body>

        <div id="newBody" style="width:400px; height:300px; cursor:pointer; background:#ffddee; border:2px solid #ddaa66;">
            <div id="pageContent" style="width:200px; cursor:auto; background:#fff;">
                <p>This is a paragraph <a href="">click here</a>.</p>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Although this is an HTML snippet everything is done with javascript with the same outcome.

The standard says something really vague: The UA determines the cursor to display based on the current context. , also these pages didn't help on the issue

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/ui.html

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa358795%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_class_cursor.asp

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/CSS/cursor

Can anyone explain this behaviour or know a possible way around it?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think auto is inheriting the parent style (not sure), I tried cursor:default; and It worked fine in IE 8 and FF 3.6.

<div id="newBody" style="width:400px; height:300px; cursor:pointer; background:#ffddee; border:2px solid #ddaa66;">
    <div id="pageContent" style="width:200px; cursor:default; background:#fff;">
        <p>This is a paragraph <a href="">click here</a>.</p>
    </div>
</div>
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1  
Yes, this works a little better in IE than my example true, but still does not work right, the cursor over text is "default", but it should be "text". May end up setting different style for IE and FF. As for inheritance, the question is how auto works. Is it the same as inherit then? –  Olga Jan 10 '12 at 8:33
    
for the lack of other anwsers: accept. After all I had to use this in the end. Still curious though. –  Olga Feb 20 '12 at 14:07
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Use CSS:

#pageContent {cursor:default}
#pageContent * {cursor:auto}​

The cursor still ends up always being 'default' in IE, but at least other browsers display the expected behaviour.

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