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My code reviewers has pointed it out that the use of operator[] of the map is very bad and lead to errors:

map[i] = new someClass;    // potential dangling pointer when executed twice

Or

if (map[i]==NULL) ...      // implicitly create the entry i in the map 

Although I understand the risk after reading the API that the insert() is better of since it checks for duplicate, thus can avoid the dangling pointer from happening, I don't understand that if handled properly, why [] can not be used at all?

I pick map as my internal container exactly because I want to use its quick and self-explaining indexing capability.

I hope someone can either argue more with me or stand on my side:)

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2  
In general, "never do this" rules are bad. There are cases where you actually need something and you should break the rule. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 10 '12 at 9:12
1  
(On a related note, see Boost Pointer Containers for containers that will keep pointers and destroy them when needed) –  Magnus Hoff Jan 10 '12 at 9:14
    
You should avoid using [] and prefer insert/find instead. This is common sense, like avoid uninitialized variables, compiler warnings etc. –  rmflow Jan 10 '12 at 9:15
    
Thanks Magnus, however BoostC++ is not an option in my environment.. –  Figo Jan 10 '12 at 9:18
1  
I can't see any dangling pointers in this case. There might be a memory leak, but that's not the same! A dangling pointer is a pointer to something that no longer exists, but there is not a single delete in sight (or any other cause) that can result in this situation. –  Sjoerd Jan 10 '12 at 9:51
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9 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The only time (that I can think of) where operator[] can be useful is when you want to set the value of a key (overwrite it if it already has a value), and you know that it is safe to overwrite (which it should be since you should be using smart pointers, not raw pointers) and is cheap to default construct, and in some contexts the value should have no-throw construction and assignment.

e.g. (similar to your first example)

std::map<int, std::unique_ptr<int>> m;
m[3] = std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(5));
m[3] = std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3)); // No, it should be 3.

Otherwise there are a few ways to do it depending on context, however I would recommend to always use the general solution (that way you can't get it wrong).

Find a value and create it if it doesn't exist:

1. General Solution (recommended as it always works)

std::map<int, std::unique_ptr<int>> m;
auto it = m.lower_bound(3);
if(it == std::end(m) || m.key_comp()(3, it->first))
   it = m.insert(it, std::make_pair(3, std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3)));

2. With cheap default construction of value

std::map<int, std::unique_ptr<int>> m;
auto& obj = m[3]; // value is default constructed if it doesn't exists.
if(!obj)
{
   try
   {
      obj = std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3)); // default constructed value is overwritten.
   }
   catch(...)
   {
      m.erase(3);
      throw;
   }
}

3. With cheap default construction and no-throw insertion of value

std::map<int, my_objecct> m;
auto& obj = m[3]; // value is default constructed if it doesn't exists.
if(!obj)
   obj = my_objecct(3);

Note: You could easily wrap the general solution into a helper method:

template<typename T, typename F>
typename T::iterator find_or_create(T& m, const typename T::key_type& key, const F& factory)
{
    auto it = m.lower_bound(key);
    if(it == std::end(m) || m.key_comp()(key, it->first))
       it = m.insert(it, std::make_pair(key, factory()));
    return it;
}

int main()
{
   std::map<int, std::unique_ptr<int>> m;
   auto it = find_or_create(m, 3, []
   {
        return std::unique_ptr<int>(new int(3));
   });
   return 0;
}

Note that I pass a templated factory method instead of a value for the create case, this way there is no overhead when the value was found and does not need to be created. Since the lambda is passed as a template argument the compiler can choose to inline it.

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I think you missed a word in your first sentence –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 10:30
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Indeed. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 10:54
1  
Hurrah! Found it :P –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 11:14
    
Well, simplicity is in the eye of the beholder. And if the insertion of the new element cannot throw (say a std::map<int, int> then the try/catch is not needed, the default construction would be trivial, and so my solution would be... perfect! –  rodrigo Jan 10 '12 at 12:07
    
Well, new can always throw, and you still create a unnecessary default constructed value. But yea, in some cases (no throw guarantee and cheap default construction) your solution is simpler. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 12:11
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You are right that map::operator[] has to be used with care, but it can be quite useful: if you want to find an element in the map, and if not there create it:

someClass *&obj = map[x];
if (!obj)
    obj = new someClass;
obj->doThings();

And there is just one lookup in the map. If the new fails, you may want to remove the NULL pointer from the map, of course:

someClass *&obj = map[x];
if (!obj)
    try
    {
        obj = new someClass;
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        obj.erase(x);
        throw;
    }
obj->doThings();

Naturally, if you want to find something, but not to insert it:

std::map<int, someClass*>::iterator it = map.find(x); //or ::const_iterator
if (it != map.end())
{
    someClass *obj = it->second;
    obj->doThings();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think the try/catch shows that it is a bad idea... you could do it simpler with find/insert. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 9:40
    
Yes, but find / insert will search for the item twice. operator[] will do it in just one access! –  rodrigo Jan 10 '12 at 10:00
1  
True enough, if that is a concern you should use lower_bound/insert. See my updated answer. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 10:03
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  1. operator [] is avoided for insertion, because for the same reason you mentioned in your question. It doesn't check for duplicate key and overwrites on the existing one.
  2. operator [] is mostly avoided for searching in the std::map. Because, if a key doesn't exist in your map, then operator [] would silently create new key and initialize it (typically to 0). Which may not be a preferable in all cases. One should use [] only if there is need to create a key, if it doesn't exist.
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Then my question will be, when should we really use the operator then? Isn't the indexing one of the greatest feature of mapping in general? –  Figo Jan 10 '12 at 9:15
    
Another question: how do I test if an entry by a certain indexing is empty then? And when we step by, if (map[i]==NULL) is not that bad, if the second of the pair is a pointer, it will be initialized to zero right? –  Figo Jan 10 '12 at 9:17
    
@Figo, while finding an element, if a key is not found then it returns end() iterator. If in your application, you need to create a key if it's not found, then use operator []. –  iammilind Jan 10 '12 at 9:19
    
Actually, the greatest feature of the map in general is the key-value mapping usually implemented as some sort of search tree and a guaranteed complexity of O(log(n)) for the find operation ;). Besides that, you can use operator[] (which should be slightly less performant than insert or find on its own, because it does both jobs) when you know what you are doing and you can guarantee that your assumptions dont break under code maintenance (which you generally cannot). –  cli_hlt Jan 10 '12 at 9:20
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Claims like "use of operator[] of the map is very bad" should always be a warning sign of almost religious belief. But as with most such claims, there is a bit of truth lurking somewhere. The truth here however is as with almost any other construct in the C++ standard library: be careful and know what you are doing. You can (accidentally) misuse almost everything.

One common problem is potential memory leaks (assuming your map owns the objects):

std::map<int,T*> m;
m[3] = new T;
...
m[3] = new T;

This will obviously leak memory, as it overwrites the pointer. Using insert here correctly isn't easy either, and many people make a mistake that will leak anyways, like:

std::map<int,T*> m;
minsert(std::make_pair(3,new T));
...
m.insert(std::make_pair(3,new T));

While this will not overwrite the old pointer, it will not insert the new and also leak it. The correct way with insert would be (possibly better enhanced with smart pointers):

std::map<int,T*> m;
m.insert(std::make_pair(3,new T));
....
T* tmp = new T;
if( !m.insert(std::make_pair(3,tmp)) )
{
    delete tmp;
}

But this is somewhat ugly too. I personally prefer for such simple cases:

std::map<int,T*> m;

T*& tp = m[3];
if( !tp )
{
    tp = new T;
}

But this is maybe the same amount of personal preference as your code reviewers have for not allowing op[] usage...

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What if new T throws? Then you have an "empty" entry in the map. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 9:48
    
@ronag: That is why I am talking about smart pointers. This is not meant as a perfect example, but rather to transfer the idea, as it has to be adapted to the situation anyways. –  PlasmaHH Jan 10 '12 at 9:53
    
I would still encourage you to write a "correct" example. How would using a smart pointer change the fact that you will have an empty entry in the map if new throws. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 9:55
    
@ronag: It won't. I was merely pointing out how all of this is not a perfect example. In a perfect example there would be smart pointers in the map, or a similar construct, since when the map goes out of scope memory is leaked too etc. I personally think that we should leave it to the basics, to show the point, and not to convolute things. I personally even work in an environment where you generally don't care about new throwing, so whether or not this would help the OP with his real issue can only be judged by him, and I think he will manage it by reading these comments. –  PlasmaHH Jan 10 '12 at 10:00
    
I would tend to disagree, since you are showing an incorrect example, a fast reader might consider it correct and start using it. –  ronag Jan 10 '12 at 10:08
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If your map is like for example this :

std::map< int, int* >

then you lose, because next code snippet would leak memory :

std::map< int, int* > m;
m[3] = new int( 5 );
m[3] = new int( 2 );

if handled properly, why [] can not be used at all?

If you properly tested your code, then your code should still fail the code review, because you used raw pointers.

Other then that, if used properly, there is nothing wrong with using map::operator[]. However, you would probably be better with using insert/find methods, because of possible silent map modification.

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1  
There is nothing specific to op[] in your example there. It's just as if you overwrote a pointer. This is not a reason that map's op[] is "bad". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 10:30
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 map[i] = new someClass;    // potential dangling pointer when executed twice

here, the problem isn't map's operator[], but *the lack of smart pointers. Your pointer should be stored into some RAII object (such as a smart pointer), which imemdiately takes ownership of the allocated object, and ensures it will get freed.

If your code reviewers ignore this, and instead say that you should avid operator[], buy them a good C++ textbook.

if (map[i]==NULL) ...      // implicitly create the entry i in the map 

That's true. But that's because operator[] is designed to behave differently. Obviously, you shouldn't use it in situations where it does the wrong thing.

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I don't see where smart pointers would solve the general problem (which in this case, may be using pointers to begin with, when value semantics are more appropriate). There are a few cases where smart pointers are appropriate, but I've yet to see a case where a map to smart pointers was the correct solution. –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 10:20
    
@JamesKanze: but they would solve the specific problem that "if I call new and store the result into the same destination object, I'll leak memory", which seems to be the supposed problem in the first case, and which has very little to do with std::map. Have I misunderstood the OP? –  jalf Jan 10 '12 at 13:04
    
The specific problem in this case is probably not the use of map[], but the use of new. If you use value semantics, rather than new and a pointer, you don't have a leak, regardless of what happens. (Another possible specific problem is that the code doesn't expect to replace an existing value. In that case, of course, insert should be used, rather than [], with a test of the return value.) –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 13:21
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Generally the problem is that operator[] implicitly creates a value associated with the passed-in key and inserts a new pair in the map if the key does not occur already. This can break you logic from then on, e.g. when you search whether a certain key exists.

map<int, int> m;
if (m[4] != 0) {
  cout << "The object exists" << endl; //furthermore this is not even correct 0 is totally valid value
} else {
  cout << "The object does not exist" << endl;
}
if (m.find(4) != m.end()) {
  cout << "The object exists" << endl; // We always happen to be in this case because m[4] creates the element
}

I recommend using the operator[] only when you know you will be referencing a key already existing in the map(this by the way proves to be not so infrequent case).

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But how can you be sure that the key isn't already present? The only correct use of operator[] I know is when you want a new default constructed object if the object isn't already present (e.g. things like symbol maps, where every symbol you see in the source should be present in the map). –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 10:22
    
You do not encounter if the key is present - the existing value is returned. The problem occurs when it does not exist - a new object is constructed. Example of a case in which you know an object is present is when your keys are from some sort of enumeration. –  Boris Strandjev Jan 10 '12 at 10:26
    
When would you use an enumeration as the key type of a std::map? If the key type is an enumeration, I'd use an std::vector, or even a C style array. I don't know of any case where I could be sure that the key was already present, over the full lifetime of the code. (Even with an enum, someone could add a value to the enum, but forget to modify the initialization of the map to include it.) –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 11:48
    
I have used enumeration in more wide sense. I can give you an example: imagine you develop site that consists of several screens, one allowing to add new, say, contact and one other allowing you to choose some of them. In the latter your software lists all contacts in alphabetical order (so you need ordered structure), thus you know the selection is already existing in a map and you can query the name using operator[]. –  Boris Strandjev Jan 10 '12 at 12:18
    
But how do you know that the string you have is one of the valid strings? The problem is that the only way you can know whether a potential key is contained in the map is to use find. (But I think I see what you're getting at: you've iterated over the map to create a list of its keys, and are using an element chosen from the list. I'd still tend to use find, with an assert if it returns the end pointer, but that's just defensive programming, and may not be justified.) –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 13:18
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This is not a problem with [] at all. It's a problem with storing raw pointers in containers.

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It's not a problem with raw pointers in containers per se. It's (probably) a problem of using pointers when value semantics are more appropriate. –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 10:20
    
@James: I disagree. A shared-pointer value_type may make sense here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 10:29
    
Highly unlikely. About the only case I can think of is if the object is polymorphic. And even then: in the cases I've seen, the objects have either had static lifetime, or been inserted in the constructor and removed in the destructor; in both of those cases, a shared_ptr is going to cause problems, not solve them. –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 11:45
    
@James: Or you're creating a mapping between some index and objects that are also "contained" elsewhere. Happens often enough, and shared pointers were ultimately designed for this purpose (or, at least, the use of a container is merely a mass extension of their purpose). –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 10 '12 at 12:09
    
If the objects are contained elsewhere, shared_ptr will cause undefined behavior. –  James Kanze Jan 10 '12 at 13:15
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There's nothing wrong with operator[] of map, per se, as long as its semantics correspond to what you want. The problem is defining what you want (and knowing the exact semantics of operator[]). There are times when implicitly creating a new entry with a default value when the entry isn't present is exactly what you want (e.g. counting words in a text document, where ++ countMap[word] is all that you need); there are many other times that it's not.

A more serious problem in your code may be that you are storing pointers in the map. A more natural solution might be to use a map <keyType, someClass>, rather than a map <keyType, SomeClass*>. But again, this depends on the desired semantics; for example, I use a lot of map which are initialized once, at program start up, with pointers to static instances. If you're map[i] = ... is in an initialization loop, executed once at start up, there's probably no issue. If it's something executed in many different places in the code, there probably is an issue.

The solution to the problem isn't to ban operator[] (or maps to pointers). The solution is to start by specifying the exact semantics you need. And if std::map doesn't provide them directly (it rarely does), write a small wrapper class which defines the exact semantics you want, using std::map to implement them. Thus, your wrapper for operator[] might be:

MappedType MyMap::operator[]( KeyType const& key ) const
{
    MyMap::Impl::const_iterator elem = myImpl.find( key );
    if ( elem == myImpl.end() )
        throw EntryNotFoundError();
    return elem->second;
}

or:

MappedType* MyMap::operator[]( KeyType const& key ) const
{
    MyMap::Impl::const_iterator elem = myImpl.find( key );
    return elem == myImpl.end()
        ?   NULL   //  or the address of some default value
        :   &elem->second;
}

Similarly, you might want to use insert rather than operator[] if you really want to insert a value that isn't already present.

And I've almost never seen a case where you'd insert an immediately newed object into a map. The usual reason for using new and delete is that the objects in question have some specific lifetime of their own (and are not copiable—although not an absolute rule, if you're newing an object which supports copy and assignment, you're probably doing something wrong). When the mapped type is a pointer, then either the pointed to objects are static (and the map is more or less constant after initialization), or the insertion and removal is done in the constructor and destructor of the class. (But this is just a general rule; there are certainly exceptions.)

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