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I have two arrays, I am evaluating the values of one array with other. What i have done is

@array_x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);
@array_y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);

foreach $x (@array_x){
    foreach $y (@array_y){
        if ($x-$y > 0){
            next;
        }
        print "$x\n";
    }
}

Here, problem is , in array_x, its first index i.e 1-(-3)=4, it satisfies, but next 1-4=-3 is not satisfying the condition, hence it should break the loop and go for next element of array_x. Here only 5 and 6 satisfies the condition with all elements of array_y, so i should get only 5,6 in the output.

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6 Answers 6

Revised answer:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my @array_x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);
my @array_y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);
LABEL: for my $x (@array_x) {
    for my $y (@array_y) {
        next LABEL unless $x > $y;
    }
    print "$x\n";
 }
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No, i dont need larger values, my prob is to skip checking other if it is not satisfied in first step itself and go to next element. –  gthm geeky Jan 10 '12 at 13:54
    
@gthm: That's what you'll end up with though. I changed my answer to implement the algorithm you seem to be describing. –  flesk Jan 10 '12 at 15:42
    
thank you. It helped. –  gthm geeky Jan 11 '12 at 5:26

I think you might want to rethink your method. You want to find all values in @x which are greater than all in @y. You shouldn't loop over all @y each time, you should find the max of it, then filter on the max.

use strict;
use warnings;

use List::Util 'max';

my @x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);
my @y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);

my $ymax = max @y;

my @x_result = grep { $_ > $ymax } @x;

Or since I am crazy about the new state keyword:

use strict;
use warnings;

use 5.10.0;

use List::Util 'max';

my @x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);
my @y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);

my @x_result = grep { state $ymax = max @y; $_ > $ymax } @x;

Edit: on re-reading previous answers, this is the same concept as angel_007, though I think this implementation is more self-documenting/readable.

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Thank you, but my aim is to learn about skipping out of loops, not to find maximum numbers. –  gthm geeky Jan 11 '12 at 5:26

Here is your loops with labels so you can break to the outer level:

XVALUE:
foreach $x (@array_x){
    YVALUE:
    foreach $y (@array_y){
        if ($x-$y > 0){
            next XVALUE;
        }
        print "$x\n";
    }
}
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If the OP is more interested in breaking out of the outer loop than the test in question, then this is the correct answer. –  Joel Berger Jan 10 '12 at 15:40

If the intention is to just find the elements which are greater than the element in the subsequent list, the following would find it in 1 iteration of each array.

use strict;

my @array_x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);    
my @array_y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);    
my $max_y = $array_y[0];

foreach my $y (@array_y) {    
   $max_y = $y if $y > $max_y;    
}

foreach my $x (@array_x) {    
   print "\nX=$x" if $x > $max_y;
}

Output:

X=5 
X=6
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3  
use List::Util 'max'; my $max_y = max @array_y; –  Brad Gilbert Jan 10 '12 at 13:45

You can label each loop and exit the one you want. See perldoc last

E.g.:

LINE: while (<STDIN>) {
    last LINE if /^$/; # exit when done with header
    #...
}
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Not really sure what is your need, but is this what you want?

#!/usr/bin/perl
use Modern::Perl;

my @array_x= qw(1 5 3 4 6);
my @array_y= qw(-3 4 2 1 3);
foreach my $x(@array_x){
    my $OK=1;
    foreach my $y(@array_y){
        next if $x > $y;
        $OK=0;
        last;
    }
    say "x=$x" if $OK;
}

output:

x=5
x=6
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