Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've built a Django form that submits to a page on another domain (that I don't control). The idea is that I have a nicely styled, neatly generated form that fits neatly into my own site and takes the user elsewhere when it is submitted.

However,

  • If that other form changes the names of any of its fields, I need to change the names of the fields in my form and then change those names everywhere else in my application - since the name attr is coupled to the name of the property used for the field.
  • If the remote form uses silly names then my form object must also have properties with silly names which pollutes my application's code.
  • Should those names happen to be reserved words in Python (e.g. from), then it is difficult or impossible to create a Django form object representation.

Is there a way to specify a different string to use for the 'name' attribute when the field is displayed? Thus, decoupling the HTML form from the class that represents it.

This would need two components:

  1. Override the name value in the widget
  2. Make the form read this value from request.POST when it is bound

I only need step 1 in this case, but step 2 is relevant to solve the problems I listed above more generally

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

This is a pretty horrible abuse of the API, but there is a form method called add_prefix that is called to determine what the HTML name of each field should be, taking into account the form's prefix if any. You could override that so that it looks up the field name in a dictionary somewhere and returns the name you want - not forgetting to preserve the existing prefix behaviour:

FIELD_NAME_MAPPING = {
    'field1': 'html_field1',
    'field2': 'html_field2'
}

class MyForm(forms.ModelForm):
    def add_prefix(self, field_name):
        # look up field name; return original if not found
        field_name = FIELD_NAME_MAPPING.get(field_name, field_name)
        return super(MyForm, self).add_prefix(field_name)
share|improve this answer
    
This is a great solution to my problem and to the general problem of field name attrs being tied to the field object's property name. However, if you need this then you may have a problem. First check if S.Lott's answer will work for you. It doesn't work for me, which is why I asked this question. –  adamnfish Jan 10 '12 at 12:26

the name attr is coupled to the name of the property used for the field.

From your description ("If that other form changes the names of any of its fields, I need to change the names of the fields in my form and then change those names everywhere else in my application - since ", "If the remote form uses silly names then my form object must also have properties with silly names which pollutes my application's code.") you recognize this as a fragile design decision.

You should consider that your view function totally solves this problem in a trivial way.

Rather than align names between the remote application and your application, use your view functions to map from your nice names to their horrible names.

This is what view functions are for.

To take it a step further, your view function does three things.

  1. Validate inputs. Perhaps persist them in some local database.
  2. Map data from your form to their request structure.
  3. Make the remote request (via httplib or urllib2 or whatever).

Items 1 and 3 don't change much.

Item 2 is a field-by-field mapping from the request.POST to a dictionary which you then url lib.urlencode to create the POST request. (Or whatever the protocol is.)

So break out item 2 into a flexible thing that you specify in your settings.

settings

MY_MAPPING_FUNCTION = module.function

In your views.py

def submit( request ):
   if request.method == POST:
       form = SomeForm( request.POST )
       if is_valid(form):
           form.save() 
           to_be_submitted = settings.MY_MAPPING_FUNCTION( form )
           remote_post( to_be_submitted ) # or whatever your protocol is

Add the mapping module to your application

module.py

def version_1_2( form ):
    return { 
        'silly_name_1': form.cleaned_data['your_nice_name'], 
        'from': form.cleaned_data['another_nice_name'],
    }

def version_2_1( form ):
    return {
         'much_worse_name': form.cleaned_data['your_nice_name'], 
         'from': form.cleaned_data['another_nice_name'],
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I realise this is trivial to do if I'm posting to a view I control. The point is, the user must be taken to another site when the form submits. You've said remote_post. That's fine to do on the server but I can't issue a "post redirect" to the client so unless I want to re-implement their business logic (I don't) I am forced to set the form's action to their site. –  adamnfish Jan 10 '12 at 11:06
1  
"I can't issue a "post redirect" to the client". That's not necessary. You can submit the form via urllib2, get the responses, and then trivially download the other site's response page to the browser from your app. Redirection has appeared to happen. The hardest part about doing this is assuring that the remote site's cookies are included in the transfer to the user's browser. You're building a "man-in-the-middle" attack. –  S.Lott Jan 10 '12 at 11:10
    
I have already looked into this and unfortunately I cannot. The response contains relative asset URLs so I'd have to write a parser to transform all paths in the response to absolute URLs on their domain. "and then trivially download the other site's response page" is no such thing! –  adamnfish Jan 10 '12 at 11:12
    
"I can't issue a "post redirect" to the client" is very unlikely to be true. You submit the form, collect the cookies, respond with a redirect that contains the cookies and does a normal GET on the remote site. It's theoretically possible for the remote site to be so bad that there is no sensible GET that can be performed, however, in which case, I have no more advice. –  S.Lott Jan 10 '12 at 11:17
1  
I've to go with adamnfish; I'm using a payment gateway which supports a function called "Alias Gateway" where the CC details are sent directly to the gateway. In this case, there is no (legal) way to submit the form on the user behalf. –  GaretJax Jul 23 '12 at 8:09

I've implemented a simple function which overwrites the widget render method and assigns a custom name:

def namedWidget(input_name, widget=forms.CharField):
    if isinstance(widget, type):
        widget = widget()

    render = widget.render

    widget.render = lambda name, value, attrs=None: \
        render(input_name, value, attrs)

    return widget

The usage is simple:

class AliasCreationForm(forms.Form):
    merchant_id = forms.CharField(
        max_length=30,
        widget=namedWidget('PSPID', forms.HiddenInput),
    )
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.