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I have a problem (maybe a fundamental understanding problem), with Java RMI. I have a "server" object and man "clients". Both are RMI objects (they implement to different Remote interfaces). The clients register themself at the server, and are stored in a list. The server will later distribute some work to the clients and fetch the result.

The problem is, that the list, where the clients are stored, seems to be not shared (I have no better description). I.e. if one client calls the server interface and registers itself, it will be added into the list, but the call seems to be only locally.

Following is an minimal example of the code:

IRemote.java

import java.rmi.Remote;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;

public interface IRemote extends Remote {
    public void remoteCall() throws RemoteException;
}

RemoteImple.java

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class RemoteImpl implements IRemote, Serializable {
    public ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    @Override
    public void remoteCall() throws RemoteException {
        list.add(23);
        System.out.println("In remote call: "+list.size());
    }
}

RegAndServer.java

import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.rmi.registry.LocateRegistry;
import java.rmi.registry.Registry;

public class RegAndServer {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws RemoteException, InterruptedException {
        Registry reg = LocateRegistry.createRegistry(Registry.REGISTRY_PORT);
        RemoteImpl impl = new RemoteImpl();
        reg.rebind("server", impl);

        while(true) {
            Thread.sleep(2000);
            System.out.println("Server sees: "+impl.list.size());
        }
    }
}

Client.java

import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.rmi.Naming;
import java.rmi.NotBoundException;
import java.rmi.RemoteException;

public class Client {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws MalformedURLException, RemoteException, NotBoundException {
        IRemote remote = (IRemote) Naming.lookup("//localhost/server");
        remote.remoteCall();
    }
}

If I start the server java RegAndServer it will output "Server sees: 0" in a loop. If I now start the client java Client in a different shell I get "In remote call: 1". However the server process still outputs "Server sees: 0".

Why is this? What am I doing wrong? I actually thought I had understood Java RMI :(

share|improve this question
    
If you put the list in RegAndServer instead of RemoteImpl and use it from there, does it work? I'm not sure but it seems like RemoteImpl objects are spawned each time. –  Viruzzo Jan 10 '12 at 11:44
    
No @Viruzzo, that doesn'z work either. –  Martin Thurau Jan 10 '12 at 11:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your RemoteImpl should not be Serializable (you don't want to send a copy of it over the network, just the stub, and the runtime does that for you), and must extend UnicastRemoteObject

import java.rmi.RemoteException;
import java.rmi.server.UnicastRemoteObject;
import java.util.ArrayList;

public class RemoteImpl extends UnicastRemoteObject implements IRemote {
    public ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    public RemoteImpl() throws RemoteException {

    }
    @Override
    public void remoteCall() throws RemoteException {
        list.add(23);
        System.out.println("In remote call: "+list.size());
    }
}

Keep in mind that the code is executed in the sever side, even though the call is made from the client, so the message "In remote call" will appear in the server log.

share|improve this answer
    
This did it. No that I see this I'm pretty sure I used UnicastRemoteObject in the past, too. –  Martin Thurau Jan 10 '12 at 13:10
    
Yeah, it's difficult to remember all the quirks of RMI. It changed quite a bit over the years to make it simpler (I still remember when we had to manually compile and distribute the skeletons and stubs, start the rmiregistry, set the codebase flag...). –  fortran Jan 10 '12 at 14:47
    
@fortran It has never changed in this particular respect. –  EJP Feb 6 '12 at 9:32
    
@EJB I didn't say it did, just that there were less things to do to set up an RMI application and it was easy to forget some step believing that it was removed. Obviously this is still there, otherwise my answer wouldn't make sense. –  fortran Feb 6 '12 at 10:28

Try to change:

public ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

to

public static ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

If it helps. Make it safe:

public class RemoteImpl implements IRemote, Serializable {
    private static volatile ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    @Override
    public void remoteCall() throws RemoteException {
        synchronized(list) {
            list.add(23);
        }
        System.out.println("In remote call: "+list.size());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, doesn't work. –  Martin Thurau Jan 10 '12 at 11:57
    
Hmm. Really surprising. Because "list" is only one instance for whole JVM. Can you add "final" to list declaration to avoid ANY POSSIBLE list reinitialisation? ("private static final volatile ArrayList<Integer> list = new ArrayList<Integer>();") –  andrey Jan 10 '12 at 12:22

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