Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Why is this:

    String str;
    while(condition){
        str = calculateStr();
        .....
    }

better than this?

    while(condition){
        String str = calculateStr();
        .....
    }

Is it necessary to declare variables outside the loop?

share|improve this question

17 Answers 17

up vote 105 down vote accepted

The scope of local variables should always be the smallest possible.

In your example I presume str is not used outside of the while loop, otherwise you would not be asking the question, because declaring it inside the while loop would not be an option, since it would not compile.

So, since str is not used outside the loop, the smallest possible scope for str is within the while loop.

So, the answer is emphatically that str absolutely ought to be declared within the while loop. No ifs, no ands, no buts.

The only case where this rule might be violated is if for some reason it is of vital importance that every clock cycle must be squeezed out of the code, in which case you might want to consider instantiating something in an outer scope and reusing it instead of re-instantiating it on every iteration of an inner scope. However, this does not apply to your example, due to the immutability of strings in java: a new instance of str will always be created in the beginning of your loop and it will have to be thrown away at the end of it, so there is no possibility to optimize there.

EDIT: (this is something that I wrote in a comment below, but I think it is worth making part of the answer.)

In any case, the right way to do things is to write all your code properly, establish a performance requirement for your product, measure your final product against this requirement, and if it does not satisfy it, then go optimize things. And what usually ends up happening is that you find ways to provide some nice and formal algorithmic optimizations in just a couple of places which make our program meet its performance requirements instead of having to go all over your entire code base and tweak and hack things in order to squeeze clock cycles here and there.

share|improve this answer
1  
Query on last paragraph: If it was another then String which is not immutable then does it affect? –  Harry Joy Jan 11 '12 at 4:15
1  
@HarryJoy Yes, of course, take for example StringBuilder, which is mutable. If you use a StringBuilder to build a new string in each iteration of the loop, then you could optimize things by allocating the StringBuilder outside the loop. But still, this is not an advisable practice. If you do it without a very good reason, it is a premature optimization. –  Mike Nakis Jan 11 '12 at 4:23
3  
@HarryJoy The right way to do things is to write all your code properly, establish a performance requirement for your product, measure your final product against this requirement, and if it does not satisfy it, then go optimize things. And you know what? You will usually be able to provide some nice and formal algorithmic optimizations in just a couple of places which will do the trick instead of having to go all over your entire code base and tweak and hack things in order to squeeze clock cycles here and there. –  Mike Nakis Jan 11 '12 at 4:23
1  
I want to ask about cost of declaration (initialization cost will be same in both case), leave about string, think about object, when we are declaring object inside large loop so does it effect on performance at least little? –  Nirmal- thInk beYond Jan 11 '12 at 4:37
2  
@MikeNakis i thing you are thinking in very narrow scope. –  Siten Jan 11 '12 at 4:45

I compared the byte code of those two (similar) examples:

Let's look at 1. example:

package inside;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        while(true){
            String str = String.valueOf(System.currentTimeMillis());
            System.out.println(str);
        }
    }
}

after javac Test.java, javap -c Test you'll get:

public class inside.Test extends java.lang.Object{
public inside.Test();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   invokestatic    #2; //Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
   3:   invokestatic    #3; //Method java/lang/String.valueOf:(J)Ljava/lang/String;
   6:   astore_1
   7:   getstatic       #4; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   10:  aload_1
   11:  invokevirtual   #5; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
   14:  goto    0

}

Let's look at 2. example:

package outside;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String str;
        while(true){
            str =  String.valueOf(System.currentTimeMillis());
            System.out.println(str);
        }
    }
}

after javac Test.java, javap -c Test you'll get:

public class outside.Test extends java.lang.Object{
public outside.Test();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   invokestatic    #2; //Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
   3:   invokestatic    #3; //Method java/lang/String.valueOf:(J)Ljava/lang/String;
   6:   astore_1
   7:   getstatic       #4; //Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
   10:  aload_1
   11:  invokevirtual   #5; //Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
   14:  goto    0

}

The observations shows that there is no difference among those two examples. It's the result of JVM specifications...

But in the name of best coding practice it is recommended to declare the variable in the smallest possible scope (in this example it is inside the loop, as this is the only place where the variable is used).

share|improve this answer
11  
+1 for going to compiled files! –  Ravi Bhatt Jan 20 '12 at 11:40
    
It is the result of the JVM Soecification, not 'compiler optimization'. The stack slots required by a method are all allocated on entry to the method. That's how the bytecode is specified. –  EJP Apr 22 '12 at 23:34
    
@PrimosK: thanks! +1 this is exactly I've been looking for! –  Arhimed Sep 27 '12 at 8:08
2  
@Arhimed there is one more reason to put it inside the loop (or just '{}' block): the compiler will reuse the memory allocated in the stack frame for the variable in another scope if you declare in that other scope some over variable. –  Serge Sep 27 '12 at 8:12
1  
Even though I am the guy with the accepted answer, I must say, I take my hat off to PrimosK! –  Mike Nakis Nov 27 '13 at 21:54

if you want to use str outside looop also; declare it outside. otherwise, 2nd version is fine.

share|improve this answer

Inside, the less scope the variable is visible into the better.

share|improve this answer

If you don't need to use the str after the while loop (scope related) then the second condition i.e.

  while(condition){
        String str = calculateStr();
        .....
    }

is better since if you define an object on the stack only if the condition is true. I.e. use it if you need it

share|improve this answer
2  
Note that even in the first variant, no object is constructed if the condition is false. –  Philipp Wendler Jan 10 '12 at 13:07
    
@ Phillip: Yes you are right. My bad. I was thinking as it is now.What do you think? –  Cratylus Jan 10 '12 at 13:20
1  
Well "defining an object on the stack" is a somewhat weird term in the Java world. Also, allocating a variable on the stack is usually a noop at runtime, so why bother? Scoping to help the programmer is the real issue. –  Philipp Wendler Jan 10 '12 at 13:23

Declaring objects in the smallest scope improve readability.

Performance doesn't matter for today's compilers.(in this scenario)
From a maintenance perspective, 2nd option is better.
Declare and initialize variables in the same place, in the narrowest scope possible.

As Donald Ervin Knuth told:

"We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time: premature optimization is the root of all evil"

i.e) situation where a programmer lets performance considerations affect the design of a piece of code. This can result in a design that is not as clean as it could have been or code that is incorrect, because the code is complicated by the optimization and the programmer is distracted by optimizing.

share|improve this answer
    
"2nd option has slightly faster performance" => have you measured it? According to one of the answers, the bytecode is the same so I don't see how performance could be different. –  assylias Sep 27 '12 at 8:00
    
I'm sorry but that's really not the right way to test the performance of a java program (and how can you test the performance of an infinite loop anyway?) –  assylias Sep 27 '12 at 15:38
    
I agree with your other points - it's just that I believe that there is no performance difference. –  assylias Sep 27 '12 at 15:49

Truly , the question stated above is an programming issue . How would like to program your code. Where do u need the 'STR' to be accessed . There is no use of declaring a variable which is used locally as a global variable . basics of programming i believe.

share|improve this answer

Variables should be declared as close to where they are used as possible.

It makes RAII (Resource Acquisition Is Initialization) easier.

It keeps the scope of the variable tight. This lets the optimizer work better.

share|improve this answer

As many people have pointed

String str;
while(condition){
    str = calculateStr();
    .....
}

is NOT better than this

while(condition){
    String str = calculateStr();
    .....
}

So don't declare variables outside their scopes if you are not reusing it..

share|improve this answer
    
except probably in this way: link –  Dainius Kreivys Mar 7 at 9:21

According to Google Android Development guide, the variable scope should be limited. Please check this link:

Limit Variable Scope

share|improve this answer

For those who care about performance take out the System.out and limit loop to 1B. Using double (test 1/2) and using String (3/4) elapsed times in milliseconds given below with Windows7P-64 & JDK-1.7.0_21. Bytecodes (also given below for test1 and test2) are not the same. I was too lazy to test with mutable & relatively complex objects

double

Test1 Took: 2710 msecs

Test2 Took: 2790 msecs

String (just replace double with string in the tests)

Test3 Took: 1200 msecs

Test4 Took: 3000 msecs

Compiling and getting bytecode

javac.exe LocalTest1.java

javap.exe -c LocalTest1 > LocalTest1.bc

public class LocalTest1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        double test;
        for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
            test = i;
        }
        long finish = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Test1 Took: " + (finish - start) + " msecs");
    }

}

public class LocalTest2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        for (double i = 0; i < 1000000000; i++) {
            double test = i;
        }
        long finish = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Test1 Took: " + (finish - start) + " msecs");
    }

}


Compiled from "LocalTest1.java"
public class LocalTest1 {
  public LocalTest1();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return        

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]) throws java.lang.Exception;
    Code:
       0: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
       3: lstore_1      
       4: dconst_0      
       5: dstore        5
       7: dload         5
       9: ldc2_w        #3                  // double 1.0E9d
      12: dcmpg         
      13: ifge          28
      16: dload         5
      18: dstore_3      
      19: dload         5
      21: dconst_1      
      22: dadd          
      23: dstore        5
      25: goto          7
      28: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
      31: lstore        5
      33: getstatic     #5                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      36: new           #6                  // class java/lang/StringBuilder
      39: dup           
      40: invokespecial #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder."<init>":()V
      43: ldc           #8                  // String Test1 Took: 
      45: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      48: lload         5
      50: lload_1       
      51: lsub          
      52: invokevirtual #10                 // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(J)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      55: ldc           #11                 // String  msecs
      57: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      60: invokevirtual #12                 // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      63: invokevirtual #13                 // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      66: return        
}


Compiled from "LocalTest2.java"
public class LocalTest2 {
  public LocalTest2();
    Code:
       0: aload_0       
       1: invokespecial #1                  // Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
       4: return        

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]) throws java.lang.Exception;
    Code:
       0: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
       3: lstore_1      
       4: dconst_0      
       5: dstore_3      
       6: dload_3       
       7: ldc2_w        #3                  // double 1.0E9d
      10: dcmpg         
      11: ifge          24
      14: dload_3       
      15: dstore        5
      17: dload_3       
      18: dconst_1      
      19: dadd          
      20: dstore_3      
      21: goto          6
      24: invokestatic  #2                  // Method java/lang/System.currentTimeMillis:()J
      27: lstore_3      
      28: getstatic     #5                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      31: new           #6                  // class java/lang/StringBuilder
      34: dup           
      35: invokespecial #7                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder."<init>":()V
      38: ldc           #8                  // String Test1 Took: 
      40: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      43: lload_3       
      44: lload_1       
      45: lsub          
      46: invokevirtual #10                 // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(J)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      49: ldc           #11                 // String  msecs
      51: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.append:(Ljava/lang/String;)Ljava/lang/StringBuilder;
      54: invokevirtual #12                 // Method java/lang/StringBuilder.toString:()Ljava/lang/String;
      57: invokevirtual #13                 // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      60: return        
}
share|improve this answer
    
Invalid testing methodology, and you don't provide any explanation of your results. –  EJP Jul 1 at 4:16
    
@EJP This should be pretty clear for those who have an interest in the subject. Methodology is taken from PrimosK's answer to provide more useful information. To be honest I have no idea how to improve this answer, maybe you can click edit and show us how to do it properly? –  Onur Gunduru Jul 4 at 18:02

declaring inside the loop limits the scope of the respective variable..it all depends on requirement of project on scope of variable

share|improve this answer

The less lines you have the easier it is to understand the code.

share|improve this answer

These two examples result the same thing. However, first provides you with using str variable outside of while loop, second is not

share|improve this answer

Declaring String str outside of the wile loop allows it to be referenced inside & outside the while loop. Declaring String str inside of the while loop allows it to only be referenced inside the while loop.

share|improve this answer

Warning for almost everybody in this thread: here is a sample code where inside the loop can easily be 200 times slower on my computer with java 7 (And the memory consumption is also slightly different). But it is about allocation and not only scope.

public class Test
{
    private final static int STUFF_SIZE = 512;
    private final static long LOOP = 10000000l;

    private static class Foo
    {
        private long[] bigStuff = new long[STUFF_SIZE];

        public Foo(long value)
        {
            setValue(value);
        }

        public void setValue(long value)
        {
            // Putting value in a random place.
            bigStuff[(int)value % STUFF_SIZE] = value;
        }

        public long getValue()
        {
            // Retrieving whatever value.
            return bigStuff[STUFF_SIZE / 2];
        }
    }

    public static long test1()
    {
        long total = 0;

        for (long i = 0; i < LOOP; i++)
        {
            Foo foo = new Foo(i);
            total += foo.getValue();
        }

        return total;    
    }

    public static long test2()
    {
        long total = 0;

        Foo foo = new Foo(0);
        for (long i = 0; i < LOOP; i++)
        {
            foo.setValue(i);
            total += foo.getValue();
        }

        return total;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        long start;

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        test1();
        System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);

        start = System.currentTimeMillis();
        test2();
        System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
    }
}

Conclusion: depending of the size of the local variable, the difference can be huge, even with not so big variables.

Just to say that sometimes, outside or inside the loop DOES matter.

share|improve this answer

You have a risk of NullPointerException if your calculateStr() method returns null and then you try to call a method on str.

More generally, avoid having variables with a null value. It stronger for class attributes, by the way.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is no way related to the question. The probability of NullPointerException(on future function calls) would not depend on how a variable is declared. –  Desert Ice Nov 22 '12 at 15:32
1  
I don't think so, because the question is "What is the best way to do it ?". IMHO I would prefer a safer code. –  Rémi Doolaeghe Nov 22 '12 at 16:32
1  
There is zero risk of a NullPointerException. If this code attempted to return str; it would encounter a compilation error. –  EJP Jul 1 at 4:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.