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I'm displaying a list of items in a WPF ListView, the items have a Quantity, Order Code and a Description. The columns are bound to fields in an ObservableCollection held in the View Model. This is all very standard and works as would expect. However, in the Quantity Column of the ListView I am adding two button + and -, the idea being that when they are pressed the value of the quantity either increments or decrements. The problem is that because these buttons are not bound to a field in the ObservableCollection I cannot get a link from the button being pressed in the List View to the record in the ObservableCollection. I have tried getting the item selected in the ListView but it is the button that gets selected when pressed and not the ListView item, I have also captured the item beneath the mouse pointer when the button is pressed but it could be pressed using the keyboard.

I feel there must be a (simple!) way of doing this but I can't find it.

This is the XAML:

<ListViewName="AccessoriesContent" >
    <ListView.View>
        <GridView>
            <GridView.Columns>
                <GridViewColumn Header="Select">
                    <GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
                        <DataTemplate>
                            <StackPanel  Orientation="Horizontal" Name="QuantityStack">
                                <Button Name="SubtractAccessoryButton" Command="vx:DataCommands.SubtractAccessory" Content="-" />
                                <TextBox Name="QuantityTextBox" Text="{Binding Quantity, Mode=TwoWay}" />
                                <Button Name="AddAccessoryButton" Command="vx:DataCommands.AddAccessory" Content="+" />
                            </StackPanel>
                        </DataTemplate>
                    </GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
                </GridViewColumn>
                <GridViewColumn Header="Order Code"  DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding OrderCode}" />
                <GridViewColumn Header="Description"  DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Description}" />
            </GridView.Columns>
        </GridView>
    </ListView.View>
</ListView>

The code behind:

    public MainWindow()
    {
        //CommandBindings.Add(
        InitializeComponent();
        AccessoryVM = new AccessoryViewModel();
        AccessoriesContent.ItemsSource = AccessoryVM.AccessoryCollection;
    }

And the ViewModel:

class AccessoryViewModel
{
    ObservableCollection<AccessoryData> _AccessoryCollection =
    new ObservableCollection<AccessoryData>();

    public ObservableCollection<AccessoryData> AccessoryCollection
    { get { return _AccessoryCollection; } }

    public void PopulateAccessories(string order_code)
    {
        // Read the data and populate AccessoryCollection
    }
}

public class AccessoryData : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private int _quantity;
    public int Quantity
    {
        get { return _quantity; }
        set
        {
            this._quantity = value;
            Notify("Quantity");
        }
    }
    public string OrderCode { get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }


    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected void Notify(string propName)
    {
        if (this.PropertyChanged != null)
        {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propName));
        }
    }
}

Beyond this I have two methods SubtractAccessory and AddAccessory which are triggered by the buttons but I have yet to populate them with anything that would work.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Another option is to create a RelayCommand (see here). In this model you create an ICommand property on each of your items. You then set this property to a new RelayCommand that accepts a delegate you would like to be ran when that command is activated. So this could be a QuantityUp method and a QuantityDown method on your AccessoryData. Once you've got your ICommand property in place you simply bind to it like this, where QuantityUpCommand is your ICommand property.

 <GridViewColumn Header="" >
   <GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
     <DataTemplate>
       <Button Height="15" Width="15" Content="+" Command="{Binding QuantityUpCommand}"/>
     </DataTemplate>
   </GridViewColumn.CellTemplate>
 </GridViewColumn>

The AccessoryData would look something like this

private RelayCommand _quantityUpCommand;
public ICommand QuantityUpCommand
{
    get
    {
        if (_quantityUpCommand == null)
        {
            _quantityUpCommand = new RelayCommand(QuantityUp);
        }
        return _quantityUpCommand;
    }
}

public void QuantityUp(object obj)
{
   Quantity++;
}

And RelayCommand looks something like this:

public class RelayCommand: ICommand
{
        #region Fields

        readonly Action<object> _execute;
        readonly Predicate<object> _canExecute;

        #endregion // Fields

        #region Constructors

        public RelayCommand(Action<object> execute)
            : this(execute, null)
        {
        }

        public RelayCommand(Action<object> execute, Predicate<object> canExecute)
        {
            if (execute == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("execute");

            _execute = execute;
            _canExecute = canExecute;
        }
        #endregion // Constructors

        #region ICommand Members

        public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
        {
            return _canExecute == null ? true : _canExecute(parameter);
        }

        public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged
        {
            add { CommandManager.RequerySuggested += value; }
            remove { CommandManager.RequerySuggested -= value; }
        }

        public void Execute(object parameter)
        {
            _execute(parameter);
        }

        #endregion // ICommand Members
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mark, this is just what I was looking for - works a treat. –  Marcus Jan 10 '12 at 15:12
    
Glad I could help. I banged my head against this same wall for a while before I came across this solution. If this works for you I would appreciate it if you mark this as your accepted solution. –  Mark Rucker Jan 10 '12 at 15:19

You do not appear to have posted the commands you use.

Anyway, if you do use commands you could either use instance commands which exist on the view model (you then will need to bind the command to the command property on the DataContext) and hence have access to the Quantity or you can pass the view model as CommandParameter just setting it to {Binding}, then in the command you can cast the parameter to the VM and change the Quantity.

(If you were to use the Click event you could just cast the sender to Button and cast its DataContext to the VM)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing out you can get the ViewModel from Button.DataContext –  Rachel Jan 10 '12 at 14:47
    
H.B. Thanks for the answer. I was using an instance command but was having problems with the CommandParameter, I shall haev another look. –  Marcus Jan 10 '12 at 15:16
    
For programmers who are new to the MVVM framework I would like to point out here that the DataContext doesn't always contain the ViewModel. The programmer has to have explicitly set the DataContext equal to the ViewModel in the code in order to be able to later get the ViewModel from the DataContext. –  Mark Rucker Jan 10 '12 at 15:17
1  
@MarkRucker: That is not true in this context, in a ListView the elements in the item template always do have the VM as DataContext. –  H.B. Jan 10 '12 at 15:22
    
@Marcus: As i said , if have the command on the instance you do not even need the command parameter because the command is on the same object as the Quantity, hence you can directly access it. If you use some form of relay command it is of note though that if you use lambdas to create the execute-method you should intialize the command backing field in the contructor, not in the field initializer which is quasi-static and hence has no access to the object instance. –  H.B. Jan 10 '12 at 15:24

You could pass the current item through a CommandParameter on the button that uniquely identifies the current item. So that in the execution of the Command you know what item you're talking about. If you can't find a unique token in your item, you could even pass the whole item!

<Button Name="AddAccessoryButton" Command="vx:DataCommands.AddAccessory" CommandParameter="{Binding}" Content="+" />

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